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Hotels Accuse Expedia, Orbitz of Deceit, 'Bait and Switch'

A small hotel has brought a suit against travel company Expedia alleging that it used underhanded tactics in order to siphon booking business to its partner hotels instead.

The case is currently in the courts being reviewed for class action certification. Causes of action include false advertising, unfair competition and -- of course -- "bait and switch" business tactics.

Univision, the Spanish-language broadcast company, won the auction to buy Gawker Media yesterday, for an offer of $135 million. Univision will take over Gawker after outbidding the digital media company Ziff Davis, by $45 million, according to the Los Angeles Times.

Gawker Media, whose network of websites pioneered the gossipy, confessional medium of blogging, declared bankruptcy last month, after the former professional wrestler Hulk Hogan won a $140 million invasion of privacy lawsuit against them. The sale should be approved by a bankruptcy judge sometime this week.

Is Obesity a Protected Disability Under the ADA?

As America's waistline has gotten bigger, so too have the number of lawsuits that have asked the very important question: is obesity a qualifying disability under the Americans with Disabilities Act? Well, the short answer is no, but the more lawyerly answer is "yes, practically."

Below we get into the weeds of obesity and its relationship with the Americans with Disabilities Act.

OSHA's Multi-Employer Citation Policy: Intro for In-House Lawyers

In-house attorneys are generally aware that workplace safety can be one of the most pressing concerns for a business client, but they might be less familiar with the implications of OSHA's Multi-Employer Citation Policy.

If you're wondering, what is OSHA's Multi-Employer Citation Policy? Then you're in luck. This quick overview is for you.

Roger Ailes isn't the only (alleged) sexual harasser in corporate America. Ailes stepped down as head of Fox News recently, following a harassment lawsuit by former Fox star Gretchen Carlson and an internal investigation that "sealed his fate." And he's got company. The EEOC alone took nearly 40,000 sexual harassment enforcement and litigation actions in 2014.

Those sexual harassment claims can expose businesses to significant liability, even when all the proper policies are in place. Thankfully, there are a few steps companies can take to mitigate their liability, should a member of the company, be it a CEO or janitor, be accused of harassment.

Airbnb Hires Eric Holder for Damage Control

In order to develop a 'world-class anti-discrimination policy,' Airbnb recently hired former U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder. This move follows rather coincidentally after the company became tangled up in a lawsuit alleging discrimination by hosts against guests based on their sex or ethnicity.

Social media can be a great way for a company to expand its reach and build consumer loyalty. REI's Instagram photos of kayaks and mountains have garnered a following of more than 1 million. Coca-Cola has nearly 100 million likes on Facebook. That's more followers than the population of Germany. And General Electric (yes, that General Electric, the one with the dishwashers and refrigerators) has been named one of the best brands on Snapchat.

So, social media has its benefits. But, of course, it also has its drawbacks, including potential legal liabilities. Here's what they are and how you can avoid them.

Chinese Smartphone Company Sues Apple for IP Infringement

Last week reports were coming out of tech news that Apple was being forced to stop selling iPhones in Beijing due to a pending patent violation claim by a Chinese smartphone company Shenzhen Baili. As it turns out, sales will continue, but we were struck by the role reversal. That's right: a Chinese company was suing a Western company for copying IP.

But it gets a little bit better than that. It turns out that the business community in China is equally adept at copying questionable Western business practices as it is at copying American trademarks. It's looking more and more like Shenzhen Baili is nothing more than a patent troll.

Federal agencies, that fourth branch of government, have been increasing regulation and enforcement actions in the past years, expanding readings of federal employment laws, targeting individual corporate officers, and even inching closer and closer to institutions once considered "too big to jail." And as government enforcement becomes increasingly robust, many old lessons are starting to change.

To help you stay on top of it all, here are our top pieces on recent government litigation and enforcement trends, from the FindLaw archives.

President Obama signed the Defend Trade Secrets Act into law last week, giving powerful new tools to companies looking to protect their trade secrets from misappropriations.

The act adds two major weapons to the corporate legal arsenal: a federal cause of action for trade secrets theft and a civil seizure mechanism that gives the act some serious bite. But it also places new requirements on employers. Here's what in-house counsel should know.