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The potential legal pitfalls of a company's social media presence are matched only by the seemingly endless variety of social media platforms about which to worry.

Facebook and Twitter should certainly be in your wheelhouse by now, but you may or may not be familiar with Instagram, a mobile-based video and photo sharing platform. Even if you're not entirely up to speed on social networking, you may remember Instagram as the company Facebook purchased in 2012 for a cool $1 billion.

Despite being owned by Facebook, Instagram is still operated as a stand-alone social network. As such, it has its own set of potential issues for general counsel to be aware of. Like what? Here are three things to watch out for on your company's Instagram profile:

Here's a lesson that isn't quite a lesson -- more of a reminder: Avoid public Wi-Fi.

It doesn't matter if it's hotel Wi-Fi, Starbucks Wi-Fi, or your neighbor's unsecured network -- stay away when dealing with secure information. And seriously, if you get a surprise "Update This Now!" pop-up while on a public Wi-Fi network, don't click on the darn thing.

It sounds like common sense, but not everyone has that much sense in common, if you get the Jay-Z reference. The latest from Kaspersky Labs says that a "'Darkhotel' espionage campaign" has been fooling corporate travelers and targeting their data since at least 2009.

Earlier this week, as part of National Disability Employment Awareness Month, the EEOC held a "live Twitter chat" where members of the public could ask questions about disabilities and employment that would be answered on Twitter by EEOC Chair Jenny Yang and Commissioner Chai Feldblum.

So what did we learn from this event? Here are a few takeaways:

The need for attorney-client privilege for in-house attorneys performing internal investigations is obvious: In order to investigate to the best of your ability, and to ensure that employees are as forthcoming as possible, investigations done for the purpose of legal advice need to be covered by privilege.

So how do you keep your privilege and assure that your internal investigation doesn't turn into evidence in a trial? Here are three tips you may want to consider:

You've probably heard about the inevitable development of the Ray Rice saga. The NFL Pro Bowl running back, who was cut by the Ravens yesterday, was previously suspended for two games after he was charged with felony domestic violence. A video of the aftermath of the incident -- Ray dragging his unconscious fiancé (now wife) out of an elevator -- emerged, creating quite the public relations nightmare, but little in the way of actual consequences.

Ray Rice copped a plea for a pre-trial deterrence program, the NFL suspended him for two games, and the Ravens stood behind him -- until yesterday, when TMZ leaked a video of Ray beating Janay Rice inside the elevator. The incident has created a number of issues: public relations nightmares and collective bargaining/labor law questions.

In our ever-connected world, we lawyers are not strangers to the concept of always being "on call." In fact, when I picture a lawyer, the first image that comes to mind is someone checking their email on their phone -- constantly. While that may be normal for lawyers, what about the rest of your company's employees?

Earlier this year, Gallup reported that nearly eight in 10 (or 79 percent) of workers who "stay connected to the workplace outside of their normal working hours" view it as a "somewhat or strongly positive development."

Before you draft a hasty company policy regarding after-hours email, there are a few things to consider.

Um, Halloween in New Orleans? Do you need any other reason to attend this year's Association of Corporate Counsel Annual Meeting, October 28 to 31 in The Big Easy?

In fact, go book your flight, hotel room, and tickets to the meeting right now. We'll wait. Just leave this article open and do it in a new tab.

That's better. Now that you're all booked, what do you have to look forward to?

Welcome to the world of in-house counsel, the attorney who lives inside a company as one of its employees, advising and representing it. Did you go to the right law school for this? If you went to Harvard Law School, then you're well on your way.

Harvard, though, isn't your only option. Other top law schools send their graduates in-house, as well. For example, have you considered The Lone Star State? University of Texas, Austin ranks #5 in terms of sending its graduates in-house. UT School of Law ranks #15 on U.S. News and World Report's list of the best law schools -- nothing to sniff at -- but is among the biggest providers of in-house counsel. What gives?

Last week we had one of the worst days of news in recent history. The ongoing Israeli conflict in Gaza, and the downed Malaysian Airlines flight 17 put front and center what we often try to forget: there are world conflicts that persist and life in other countries is not as safe as it can be here.

While we're insulated in our corporate cubes and offices, you may think that outside of news, these global crises don't have an impact on us. But you're wrong. Every world crisis can be a potential corporate crisis if you don't take the following steps.

How do you define the role of the modern in-house lawyer? It's probably some amalgamation of legal counsel, reputation manager, data security watchdog, and consigliore to the board. This person should also, of course, be good at watching the bottom line and reigning in outside counsel costs.

At this year's "The Lawyer" Awards (sponsored by Thomson Reuters, our parent company), the UK publication sought to recognize someone who excelled at the jack-of-all-trades role. Who did they pick for In-House Attorney of the Year? Sarah Nelson-Smith of Yum! Restaurants, the parent company of Kentucky Fried Chicken, Taco Bell, and Pizza Hut.