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Last week we had one of the worst days of news in recent history. The ongoing Israeli conflict in Gaza, and the downed Malaysian Airlines flight 17 put front and center what we often try to forget: there are world conflicts that persist and life in other countries is not as safe as it can be here.

While we're insulated in our corporate cubes and offices, you may think that outside of news, these global crises don't have an impact on us. But you're wrong. Every world crisis can be a potential corporate crisis if you don't take the following steps.

Earlier this week, Corporate Counsel released the results of its 2014 GC Compensation Survey, which lists the top 100 (with caveats) best-paid general counsel. And while we all know that GCs make a lot of money, when you actually see the figures, I assure you, your jaw will drop.

So here goes, let's all turn green with envy picture what we would do with $5 million as we take a look at the survey results.

Law school, despite being an academic institution, is a bit controversial these days. You have those who complain about not being able to do anything with their law degree, those who disagree, those who want to shorten law school to two years, and those who want to "kill" law school.

Amidst the controversy, we see a new trend emerging -- coursework geared toward working as in-house counsel. Let's take a look at the offerings, and how you, as in-house counsel, can get involved.

Creativity. Innovation. These aren't adjectives that are typically applied to lawyers, and for good reason: we're not Picassos, Hemmingways, or even code wizards like ten-years-ago Zuckerberg.

But in-house lawyers are involved in innovation: you can invent the next big thing, but if the IP isn't protected, it'll only be valuable until a bigger, stronger company steals the idea. You can build the next great product, until your team flees for a different company. You can challenge the status quo -- until a regulatory war grinds your progress to a halt.

Corporate counselors may not be the artists, but they make the artists' work possible, and profitable, in these three ways:

Until a couple of weeks ago, nine out of ten people would've stared at you blankly if you had said the name "Adam Silver." The tenth was most assuredly a Lakers fan, and was glad that David "basketball reasons" Stern was finally gone. Silver has long been the anonymous sidekick of the former commissioner, and outside of those few celebrating Angelinos, remained anonymous even after he took the NBA's seat of power on February 1, 2014.

And then, Donald Sterling happened. Silver, after announcing Sterling's lifetime ban and fine, trended on Twitter.

As a lifelong sports fan, who once dreamed (okay, still dreams) of being a general manager of a sports team (or a commissioner of a league), it got me wondering: how did Adam Silver go from law student to NBA superpower?

In House Lawyers Agree: We Are Afraid of Math

Maybe not just in-house lawyers, but really, how many lawyers of all stripes out there are afraid of math?

Fear of math can cause real pain as well as embarrassment, reports CBS. Now double that if you are counsel to a company that does engineering. Or pharmaceuticals. Or genetics. Or real estate. Or taxes.

Or anything.

If you declare that you "can't do math," the non-lawyers at your company might not openly mock you, but your statement will not inspire confidence in your abilities. Would you trust a professional who was otherwise great but couldn't read?

In this past month alone we've seen the initiation of two high-profile fashion cases -- one involving Rachel Roy in a dispute with her investor, Jones Apparel Group, and the other between fast fashion giants Aeropostale and H&M.

In the ever-evolving area of "fashion law" that encompasses everything from intellectual property to employment law (and many other practice areas in between), let's take a look at these cases and see what you can learn from them -- even if your company is not in the fashion industry.

Trouble Landing an In House Counsel Job? This Might Help

You dislike your current job and want to make the move to inside counsel. The pace sounds better with less pressure -- but still good money -- and you're ready to make the switch. Problem is, you've followed all the advice (network, use LinkedIn, do Internet job searches, etc.) but they haven't worked yet.

What's missing? We've got a few ideas.

In-House Counsel: 'Secret' Etiquette Tips

So you are in-house counsel. A lawyer among non-lawyers. Good manners are especially important for you because, given the grave respect -- even awe -- with which others view you, a slight discourtesy from you will be especially problematic.

Kidding.

Still, it never hurts to be polite. No one tries to be brusque or uncouth, but especially if we feel rushed or under pressure we can sometimes offend by violating rules we didn't even stop to consider. Here are some etiquette rules you might not even be aware of. Following them will only polish your already sophisticated image and smooth your way in the corporate environment.

Betterize Your Vocabulary: 5 Annoying Phrases to Avoid

There are some phrases that just tend to set one's teeth on edge. They aren't actually evil, just pretentious, tired or unintentionally offensive. They insinuate themselves into your vocabulary without you even realizing it, and then burst forth to the annoyance of those around you.

Since you have to work with lawyers and non-lawyers in your company setting, you want to be particularly careful about how you express yourself. Here are five phrases that seem particularly common among lawyers: