Injured - The FindLaw Accident, Injury and Tort Law Blog


If you have a job, chances are you have workers' compensation insurance. While state workers' comp laws can vary concerning who is covered, those distinctions are normally based on the kind of job you have, not your immigration status.

But a couple states have passed laws saying undocumented immigrants are not entitled to workers' compensation benefits. The Ohio House recently passed a bill barring workers' comp benefits for "illegal aliens," though the bill has a long way to go before becoming law.

Xarelto, the brand name of blood thinning medication rivaroxaban, can help treat and prevent dangerous blood clots in patients undergoing hip and knee replacement surgeries. An unfortunate side effect of Xarelto is an increased risk of internal or external bleeding.

A serious of lawsuits (some 20,000 in all) have been filed against the makers of Xarelto -- Johnson and Johnson and Bayer AG -- claiming the companies failed to warn consumers of the bleeding risks. And in the first verdict to go against J&J and Bayer in those cases, a Philadelphia jury awarded a woman $28 million in damages.

The fires that ravaging Northern California were barely snuffed out when Southern California was set ablaze last week. Wildfires in Los Angeles, Ventura, and San Diego Counties have burned over 150,000 acres, along with countless homes, and President Trump just approved a California disaster declaration and put the Department of Homeland Security and the Federal Emergency Management Agency in charge of disaster relief efforts in the state.

But what are homeowners left to do if their homes have been damaged by the wildfires? Here's a look.

Lawsuits can be one way of holding companies responsible for making defective products. But settlements of those lawsuits have a way of hiding the true extent of injuries caused by a poorly designed or malfunctioning device.

Take, for example, Savage Arms' stainless steel 10 ML-II muzzleloader rifle. The company is facing another lawsuit over the rifle's tendency to explode, and while it has settled a few previous lawsuits, the actual number of hunters injured by the rifle ranges from a few dozen to possibly hundreds of victims.

Drones; when they're not helping us break out of prison or roasting our Thanksgiving turkeys with a flamethrower, they're falling on our heads. Lucky for us, mega-retailer Amazon has come up with a solution to falling drones: exploding drones.

Yes, in anticipation of the company rolling out delivery drones to your rooftop like Isaac Asimov's version of Santa Claus, Amazon has been granted a patent on technology that will allow its drones to self-destruct in mid-air in an effort to preserve life on the ground. So, like Santa, the drone will disappear, leaving your presents falling blissfully to the earth.

After the appalling accusations levied at elder care facilities in Florida and California in the face of natural disasters, people are justifiably a little more worried about how their elder relatives are being cared for. What constitutes elder abuse? How do we know when it's happening? And how can we deal with elder or nursing home abuse when it happens?

Here are three legal tips when it comes to identifying and responding to elder abuse, from our archives:

Following the horrific accusations regarding a Florida nursing home in the wake of Hurricane Irma, you would hope California facilities would be on high alert during any natural disasters, like, say, a wildfire. Unfortunately, that wasn't the case.

"These people were left stranded," attorney Kathryn Stebner told the Los Angeles Times. "They had no keys, no cell service, no walkie-talkies. The three caregivers on hand did not know about any evacuation plan ... and in fact, were waiting for an executive director, who did not show up. How could they have gotten out?"

Black Friday Injury Roundup

We warned you -- Black Friday is dangerous. And, as expected, quite a few people were injured while trying to take advantage of some sweet shopping deals this year. While we're not quite as morbid as BlackFridayDeathCount.com (or as humorous as The Onion), it can be valuable to take a look at this year's injuries, how they might have been avoided, and what lawsuits may follow.

Here's a rundown of 2017's Black Friday injuries:

Johnson and Johnson has become a regular subject of our injury blogs. From talc-based baby powder causing cancer to vaginal mesh implants causing bleeding and loss of sexual function to anti-psychotics causing breast enlargement in male patients, Johnson and Johnson has been the subject of hundreds of lawsuits and been forced to pay hundreds of millions of dollars in jury verdicts. To be fair, many of the allegedly defective products were made by J&J subsidiaries, but the most damning accusations claim J&J knew of the danger to consumers and sold the products anyway.

The same can be said for Johnson and Johnson's Pinnacle hip implants designed and manufactured by DePuy Orthopaedic. Johnson and Johnson faces some 9,700 lawsuits nationwide regarding the implants and has just been ordered to pay out its third jury award, this one for $247 million.

The crowds; the anticipation; the joy; and the pain. There really is nothing like the exhilaration and hysteria of Black Friday. One day every year, American shoppers lose their collective minds in an effort to save a few bucks on Christmas presents. But the damage and injuries sustained on Black Friday can last years or even lifetimes.

So here are the five most common Black Friday injuries, how to avoid them, and what to do if you can't: