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How Technology Helps With Workers' Comp Claims

As technology continues to progress, nearly every industry is discovering new ways that the new technology can improve their processes. Alongside the medical and health industries, employers and companies that handle workers’ compensation claims are embracing mobile, wearable, and smart technologies. Some companies have even created apps and web-portals for employees to process claims through.

When it comes to workers’ comp claims, not only are the advances in technology helping with the claim processing end of things, the advances also have great potential to aid in injury prevention. However, for injured workers, no matter how simple the claim process may be, it is always advisable to contact an experienced, independent workers’ compensation attorney to review your claim.

Claim Processing Made Easy

When it comes to processing an employee’s workers’ comp claim, the proliferation of smartphones and the internet have made it possible for claimants to report and track claims electronically. Furthermore, medical appoints and meetings via video conference make it much simpler for claimants to discuss their injuries with those involved with their claim.

For companies handling the claims, smart technology can allow for automated processes to be set up, so that less administrative staff is needed to shuffle paperwork around. While there may be a high cost to setting up a smartphone enterprise app, the cost savings over time will likely justify the cost for large, and even mid-size, employers. Additionally, for employers, advances in technology can assist in detecting fraudulent claims, as well as assist in getting injured workers back to work faster.

Smart Tech Prevents Injuries

In addition to making the claim process simpler, smart technology, such as wearables, can prevent injuries in the workplace. For instance, a wearable device that monitors fatigue could be a crucial piece of technology for train conductors, bus drivers, or even factory workers. Not only that, but wearables, or even just smartphones, can provide employees with warnings if dangerous conditions or situations arise.

While the implementation of wearable tech on the job is still relatively rare, employers are increasingly using tech for training employees on safety issues and other matters. Among the most basic uses of technology to improve safety involves requiring employees to view training videos on their smart phones, or online on a computer. By providing online training, employers can cut their training and monitoring costs, as well as ensure that all employees receive the same instruction.

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