Defamation (Libel / Slander): Injured
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Defamation (Libel / Slander)

Defamation, Libel and Slander are all interrelated concepts involving personal injury to one's reputation. Libel and slander are both forms of the larger concept of defamation. Although the elements of both forms of defamation are almost identical to one and other, the key difference with the two is the fact that libel refers to defamation that can be seen whereas slander consists of oral defamatory communications.

Special rules are accorded to defamation involving public officials or public figures, where the communication is about a matter of public concern.


Recently in Defamation (Libel / Slander) Category

Teacher Gets $363K for Students' Lies, Defamation

Two California students and their parents are being held financially liable for the defamation of a teacher.

Former Catholic school physical education teacher John Fischler, 49, filed the defamation lawsuit after two schoolgirls branded him a "perv" and "creeper," and spread false rumors that he'd inappropriately touched kids and peeked into a girls' restroom at Holy Spirit School in San Jose.

After being cleared of the allegations, Fischler was awarded $362,653 in compensatory damages. Punitive damages are soon to follow.

Tawana Brawley Hoax: Defamation Payments Begin

Tawana Brawley's hoax is going to haunt her for the rest of her life in the form of monthly payments.

Twenty-six years after the infamous hoax, Brawley has started making defamation payments to Steven Pagones, the ex-prosecutor whom she falsely accused of rape in 1987.

Brawley made her first payment last week -- in checks totaling $3,764.61 -- though she still owes Pagones $431,000 in defamation damages.

Hiring an Injury Lawyer? 5 Questions to Ask

Hiring the right personal injury lawyer is crucial, and there are many questions that you may have swirling in your head. That's not just from getting knocked down by that bicyclist, either.

Whether we like it or not, injuries are often unpreventable, as run-of-the-mill accidents happen all the time. But other types of injuries -- including intentional torts and economic injuries -- often are preventable, and may leave you aching for justice.

Luckily, with the right attorney, you can have your injury matter resolved as painlessly and as quickly as possible. Here are five questions you'll want to consider asking when hiring an injury lawyer:

For many young singles, summer means plenty of new relationships and sexy flings with Australian girls named Sandy. But it can also mean you getting your pants sued off.

Summer lovers would be wise to remember these three potential causes of action that may follow getting some action:

The father of a boy misidentified by the New York Post as a Boston Marathon bombing suspect may soon extract his legal pound of flesh from the tabloid, as he is seeking counsel for a potential lawsuit.

El Houssein Barhoum, father of 16-year-old Salah Barhoum, says the possible lawsuit would seek compensation for the emotional stress and upheaval his family and his son have faced since the erroneous story was printed, reports The Washington Post.

Whether or not the Barhoum family decides to sue, it may be tricky to sue a newspaper.

Mugshot Websites Sued Over Takedown Fees

Several mugshot websites are being sued for allegedly trying to profit off the mugshots they publish, which are allegedly hurting the reputations of people who are later found innocent.

According to an Ohio class action lawsuit, mugshot websites like JustMugshots.com, BustedMugshots.com, MugshotsOnline.com, and FindMugshots.com post mugshots of people after they've been arrested. So when you search for a person's name on Google, for example, you may be able to find that person's mugshot on one of these sites, reports NPR.

However, after a person is later cleared of criminal charges, these websites don't automatically take down the mugshots or update their websites. Instead, only after the person pays a fee of up to $500 will the websites take down a mugshot, the lawsuit claims. The plaintiffs argue that this profiteering off of mugshots violates their rights over their own images.

George Zimmerman Suing NBC Over 911 Tape

After a few weeks of considering his options, George Zimmerman is suing NBC over their cut-and-paste job of the 911 call he made to police on the night Trayvon Martin was killed. Looks like Zimmerman’s been reading our analysis on whether he should sue.

The lawsuit, as expected, claims that NBC’s manipulation of the 911 call constitutes defamation by portraying Zimmerman as racist. He’s also charging specific reporters who presented the manipulated call on their shows.

NBC has already apologized for what they call an unintentional mistake. But that’s not enough for Zimmerman, who’s taking his claims public.

Can Retweeting Get You Sued for Libel?

Can retweeting a false news story get you sued for libel? The question comes on the heels of the British Broadcasting Corporation's legal settlement with a UK politician who is now going after individuals for allegedly libelous retweets, The New York Times reports.

A few weeks ago, a BBC report falsely linked Alastair McAlpine to a child sex-abuse case. It quickly came to light that the report was incorrect, and that McAlpine wasn't involved.

The BBC quickly settled a libel suit that McAlpine brought and paid the politician about $300,000, the Associated Press reports. But people who retweeted the BBC's erroneous story may be in trouble too.

Does George Zimmerman Have a Case Against NBC?

George Zimmerman may be largely considered a pariah in the court of public opinion but he claims that's the fault of NBC and not his own actions.

Zimmerman is of course famous for his role in the death of Trayvon Martin. Almost a month after the incident NBC aired a tape of a non-emergency call from Zimmerman to police. In the recording it sounds like Zimmerman volunteered that Martin was black, leading critics to call him a racist.

Then it became clear that NBC had edited the tape and that the statement was in reply to a question that wasn't aired in the broadcast.

Zimmerman's lawyer, Mark O'Mara, claims it's more than just unfair; it's enough for a lawsuit.

Do You Know How Slander, Libel and Defamation are Different?

If you've ever heard about someone making false accusations, chances are you've also heard about the resulting lawsuits. Some of them claim slander, others libel, and a few just say defamation. And then there are the ones that use all three terms.

It may seem like these lawsuits are all alleging the same exact thing, and to some extent, they are. But there is a difference between slander, libel and defamation, and it's a good difference to know.