Disability / SSDI: Injured

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The Telegraph is reporting that the World Health Organization will be updating its definition of "infertile" to include single men and women with no medical issues who have been unable to find a suitable sexual partner or sufficient sexual relationships which could achieve conception. Previously, men and women had to demonstrate 12 months of unprotected sex without conception to classify as infertile.

This may seem like a simple shift, and one that could even have the added benefit of giving gay men and women the same priority access to in vitro fertilization resources as heterosexual couples. But not everyone is happy about taking social conditions into account when changing global medical standards, especially those that could alter access to public healthcare funds.

If you are on SSDI and are considering filing a lawsuit or pursuing an injury claim, you may be concerned about how a settlement or court award could impact your receipt of benefits. Social Security Disability Insurance is a federal program designed to assist disabled individuals that are unable to work by providing those individuals with an income source.

While SSDI will want to know if you have received wages, the general rule is that an injury settlement or court award for an injury case are not wages, UNLESS a portion of that award is meant to compensate you specifically for lost wages. Also, it should be noted that if you receive punitive or exemplary damages, or any interest on the award, these may also be concerned as unearned income.

Does My Child Qualify for SSI Disability?

Government benefit programs exist to help society’s most vulnerable in times of difficulty. Many of us are familiar with social security disability insurance (SSDI) because we pay a portion of our earnings into the system. That is different from Supplemental Security Income (SSI) disability benefits. These SSI payments are available to adults and children and unrelated to employment.

According to the Social Security Administration (SSA), children who are disabled and growing up in a home with little or no income and resources are eligible for social security income. Let’s take a look at eligibility requirements and the application process for obtaining benefits for disabled children.

Mental illness and disability can be especially hard for employers to identify and accommodate for, and people with cognitive disabilities have just a 24.2 percent employment rate. And if you are unable to work due to mental cognitive impairments, anxiety related impairments, or affective impairments, you may find it difficult to prove a Social Security Disability Insurance claim.

While proving a mental disability can be a challenge, it’s not impossible. Here’s how to do it:

Employment opportunities for people with disabilities are increasing — more offices and workplaces are offering accommodations to employees with disabilities, and more employers are willing to hire prospective employees with disabilities.

But it’s not easy: people with disabilities are twice as likely to live in poverty and the employment rate for people with disabilities is less than half that for people without. So which states are better at offering people with disabilities employment opportunities? And which are worse?

Social Security Disability Insurance FAQs

So you have been paying into Social Security for years. Unfortunately, you need something from the system because you’re disabled and cannot return to work. But you don’t know much about benefits or how to get them. Here are ten frequently asked questions about Social Security Disability Insurance and how to apply.

Disability insurance can give you a source of much needed income if you’re too injured or sick to work. That’s if it pays out. All too often, Social Security disability insurance claims are denied, for a variety of reasons. This can be a disheartening experience, but it’s important to know that a denial is not the end of the process.

It is possible to appeal a denial of your disability benefits, but the first step in the appeals process is figuring out why your claim was denied in the first place. Here are three of the most common reasons Social Security disability benefits are denied:

Almost 30 million American suffer from diabetes and 86 million have prediabetes. Along with the associated health risks like an increased chance of kidney failure or heart disease, both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes can have a severe impact you ability to work.

Disability insurance is designed to compensate you if you too disabled to work, but does diabetes diagnosis qualify as a disability under the law?

If you have a service-related disability, you may be eligible for disability compensation from the VA. But the application process can be complicated and may require extensive documentation for your claim.

Here are a few facts on the disability benefits and tips on the filing process.

Sadly, there are many things that can keep us from doing the work that we love. Disabilities like ADD and ADHD, carpal tunnel syndrome, cancer, and even seasonal affective disorder can substantially limit obtaining, performing, and keeping a job. But what happens when our disability claims are denied?

Here are some frequently asked questions, and answers, regarding denials of disability insurance claims: