Negligence / Other Injuries: Injured
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Negligence and Other Injuries

Negligence is the most commonly used legal principle in personal injury lawsuits. Essentially, the concept of negligence rests on the idea that the defendant owed some sort of a duty to the injured party and that duty was somehow breached. The duty is usually breached through an action or inaction of the defendant. The breach of the injury must have been the proximate cause of the injury.

There also exists an element of foreseeability in negligence. For there to be a valid negligence claim, the injury must have been foreseeable in the actions (or inaction) of the defendant and the injured party must have been within a "zone of danger". The concept of foreseeability is sometimes different among the states but the general premise is the same.


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If you're out at the range or on the course, you're probably most concerned with how you're hitting the ball. But if you're parked nearby, you might want to watch the other folks swinging the clubs.

One circular dent in your fender can ruin an otherwise great round, and if you don't know who dinged your ride, you could be on the hook for the repairs.

You've done the hard part. You have done your research and decided you think you have a legitimate personal injury claim. Now comes the even harder part: finding the right personal injury layer.

But hiring an attorney doesn't need to be such a daunting task if you know what to look for in a personal injury lawyer.

Here at FindLaw, we talk a lot about suing for damages after an injury.

However, it's not the only way to get compensation. Whether you're trying to avoid attorney's fees or you dislike confrontation, here are a few ways you can try to get money for your injury without suing:

On Monday May 12, 2015, Amtrak Northeast Regional Train 188 completely derailed.

The Amtrak train, traveling on Amtrak's busiest route, derailed as it was going around a curve of track in Philadelphia Monday night, killing seven passengers and injuring 200 others. Passengers reported being thrown around their train cars and getting hit with flying luggage and debris.

Preliminary investigation findings show that the train was going over 100 mph before the derailment. The speed limit for that area of track was only 50 mph. Brandon Bostian, the engineer operating the train, applied full emergency breaks right before the crash, and now claims to have no memory of what happened.

So, who could be liable? What laws apply to an Amtrak crash?

Trending Personal Injury Questions From FindLaw Answers

You've got questions... we've got answers. If you have not yet asked or answered a question in FindLaw's Answers community, what are you waiting for? This amazing free resource supports a dynamic community of legal consumers and attorneys helping each other out. Simple as that.

We see a lot of great questions in our Answers community every day. Here's a look at some recent questions relating to injuries, accident, and torts from our FindLaw Answers boards:

Top Personal Injury Legal Questions From FindLaw Answers

You've got questions... we've got answers. If you have not yet asked or answered a question in FindLaw's Answers community, what are you waiting for? This amazing free resource supports a dynamic community of legal consumers and attorneys helping each other out. Simple as that.

We see a lot of great questions in our Answers community every day. Here's a look at some recent questions relating to injuries, accident, and torts from our FindLaw Answers boards:

Summer is almost here and many of us are already planning our outdoor expeditions. Safety first is the rule for any hiking or camping trip, but unfortunately not all backcountry injuries can be avoided.

So what happens if you're injured while hiking or camping this summer? If the injuries weren't your fault, could someone else be liable?

If you've read the news lately, it seems there are class action suits everywhere, from GM to Comcast to Vitaminwater. Usually, they have nothing to do with you or me.

But, if you think you may have an injury or claim similar to the class action, how do you join? How can you find out if there is a class action lawsuit for your injury?

We suffered all winter, made it through spring, and now we can finally get back out to the ballpark. Attending baseball games is one of the purest joys of the summer, and there's nothing quite like America's pastime.

Unfortunately, going to a game isn't without its dangers, so here are three (plus one) common injuries to be on the lookout for while at the old ball game.

Injury lawsuits can be complicated, especially those involving a large number of people. Class action lawsuits can allow a group of people to collectively file a single injury claim, and they can have different rules for how and when they can be filed.

One of these differences has to do with the statute of limitations, which limits the time you have to bring a case. So how do these rules differ? And if the statute of limitations has run out on your case, can you still join a class action lawsuit?