Slip and Fall / Premises Liability: Injured
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Slip and Fall and Premises Liability

Slip and Fall / Premises Liability: Under this theory, the owners and occupiers of land or property owe a legal responsibility for accidents and injuries that occur on their property. These laws are largely dependant on state law and vary from state-to-state. What's usually important in these cases is to look at the status of the injured. Where they a trespassor or were they invited to the property? The status of the injured person with regards to the property might play a role in determining duty, depending on the state. Courts might also look at the condition of the property. Finally, there may be special laws applying to landlords and lessors of property.


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Sometimes when you are injured and your property is damaged, you may not know the identity of the culprit. But just because the person responsible is unknown doesn't mean you can't sue.

The American legal system is actually set up to handle lawsuits where many (or all) of the defendants' identities are a mystery. It may make your case less likely to be a success, but not knowing a name or address isn't a fatal blow to a civil lawsuit.

So how can you still sue if you don't know who injured you?

Two-piece swimsuits at a waterpark, sure. But how about two injury lawsuits?

Kentucky Kingdom's Hurricane Bay is now the subject of two lawsuits alleging that staff allowed patrons to use the wrong inner tube for a particular slide. Louisville's WDRB-TV reports that two patrons, Brandon McClellan and Felicia Evans, have filed suit against Kentucky Kingdom for injuries incurred after falling out of the slide.

Is Kentucky Kingdom liable for these waterpark victims?

Two toddlers were hospitalized with severe injuries after a bounce house they crawled into was thrown into the air by wind.

The injured children entered the bounce house at New Hampshire's Sullivan Farm, "a popular spot for apple and pumpkin picking," reports The Boston Globe. The New Hampshire Bureau of Tramway and Amusement Ride Safety commented that because the bounce house was "not open to the public at the time," the case is out of their hands.

Who, if anyone, could be held liable for the toddlers' injuries?

Injury victims often complain that lawyers aren't willing to take their cases. And while some attorneys may simply be too busy to take up your personal injury claim, there are a few things you can do to make yourself a more attractive client.

No, not more physically attractive (although dressing professionally couldn't hurt). Rather, there are ways in which you can make your case more appealing to your prospective attorney.

Here are three good ways to make a lawyer more inclined to take your injury case:

Slip-and-fall accidents in grocery stores happen pretty frequently, but the victims often are unaware of their rights to sue.

Even under the stark, revealing light of grocery store fluorescents, many slip-and-fall victims are in the dark about a store's legal responsibility for slip-and-fall hazards. Luckily for consumers, we're offering some legal clarity -- for free!

If you slipped and fell in a grocery store, consider these points in deciding whether or not to sue:

When you meet with a personal injury attorney for a consultation, you don't want to show up empty-handed.

You want to give your potential lawyer all the information you can so she can make an accurate evaluation of your injury case. That won't exactly work if you leave crucial documents at home or at the hospital.

So make sure you bring these seven types of documents to your personal injury consultation:

Slip-and-Fall: Do You Have a Case?

As summer slips into fall, calendar-wise, the incoming wet weather in many parts of the country brings with it the risk for a more literally kind of fall: a slip-and-fall injury.

Unfortunately, wet surfaces are just one of the many conditions that can cause a slip-and-fall injury. Outdoor slip-and-fall injuries can be caused by cracked pavement or sidewalks, inadequate lighting, or hidden dangers such as unfilled holes. Indoors, polished or wax floors, torn carpets, worn stairways or improperly maintained elevators and escalators are all sources of slip-and-fall injuries.

But how do you know if your slip-and-fall injury will make for a winnable personal injury lawsuit? Here are a few factors to consider:

Injured at Work? 3 Potential Options for Recovery

Getting injured at work is a pretty common occurrence, but what are your legal options if you get hurt?

According to a FindLaw.com survey, more than one in five Americans said they've been injured on the job. Workplace injuries not only impact you physically, but it can affect you financially as well.

Here are three potential legal options to seek out if you're injured at work:

College parties have certainly been known to occasionally get out of control.

A spring-break party near the University of California, Santa Barbara earlier this year turned ugly when a campus police officer tried to arrest a partygoer...but ended up with 44 injuries and more than 100 arrests, reports The Associated Press.

If you're injured at a college party, can you sue?

Waterparks are a great way to cool off during the summer, but they can also leave you with serious injuries.

Slip-and-fall injuries, heat-related illnesses, and even drownings can occur at waterparks. And while it hasn't caused any injuries yet, the world's tallest water slide -- a 168-foot-tall slide set to open at a park in Kansas City (here's video of a test run shared by io9) -- made some of us wonder about potential liability issues (though the net makes us feel a bit more safe).

So if you're hurt at a waterpark, who can potentially be held liable?