Slip and Fall / Premises Liability: Injured
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Slip and Fall and Premises Liability

Slip and Fall / Premises Liability: Under this theory, the owners and occupiers of land or property owe a legal responsibility for accidents and injuries that occur on their property. These laws are largely dependant on state law and vary from state-to-state. What's usually important in these cases is to look at the status of the injured. Where they a trespassor or were they invited to the property? The status of the injured person with regards to the property might play a role in determining duty, depending on the state. Courts might also look at the condition of the property. Finally, there may be special laws applying to landlords and lessors of property.


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The family of John Crawford III is suing Walmart and the Beavercreek, Ohio, police department for wrongful death after the 22-year-old father was shot and killed in August.

Crawford was shot by a Beavercreek police officer responding to a 911 call about a man with a gun at Walmart; Crawford was holding a BB gun that he'd found unattended in the store. A grand jury in September declined to indict the officer or his partner for the fatal shooting. The Washington Post reports that Crawford's family is seeking more than $75,000 in damages.

Why is Walmart being sued over Crawford's death?

We tend to think of the worst when thinking of injuries related to airplanes. But while a deadly crash is one risk of air travel, what's far more likely is a mild to serious injury in-flight.

Falling bags, forcefully pushed service carts, and even pilot error can lead to injuries like you might experience on solid ground.

So how can you recover when you're injured on an airplane?

Movie theaters are no stranger to dramatic falls, earth-shaking explosions, and even bloody assaults. But we generally expect those dangerous events to take place on the screen and not in the aisle.

But with the floors lined with imitation butter, and lighting less than adequate, it requires no spoiler alert to say that anyone can suffer a slip-and-fall accident at the movies.

So can you sue if you do slip and fall at a movie theater?

Children may sometimes think they are invincible, but even children can suffer serious injuries in a slip and fall accident.

When these accidents occur while a child is at school, a personal injury lawsuit may be brought to recover for the child's injuries. However, there may be several additional steps required in order to prevail against a government agency such as a public school district.

What do you need to know about slip and fall injuries that happen at school?

Thanks to human anatomy, your knees tend to be an easy place to bruise when you fall. Also called a patellar contusion by medical professionals, a bruised knee may initially seem like nothing.

But sometimes a bruised knee is the first sign of more serious medical problems following an accident. And regardless of the extent of your knee injury, you may be entitled to compensation.

So when is a bruised knee worth suing over?

Shopping at a big box store can be exciting and cheap, but it's all fun and games until a box falls on you.

Anyone who's visited a warehouse store like Costco or Sam's Club can attest that merchandise is packed almost from floor to ceiling, with incredibly heavy items like patio furniture and crates of bulk-rate oatmeal perched high above consumers. It doesn't take much imagination to sketch a scenario in which a box falls and injures a hapless shopper.

So when that shopper happens to be you, can you sue?

Icy sidewalks routinely become an increasing threat as winter closes its icy grip on the fading days of fall. And while it may be possible for some to stay inside their homes until the thaw, the average person is likely to slip and fall on an icy patch on a sidewalk, possibly causing serious injury.

While you may think of sidewalks as a part of a city or local government's responsibility, private property owners may actually be the ones responsible for your frozen misstep.

So can you sue over slip-and-fall injuries on icy sidewalks?

Kentucky Kingdom is countersuing two patrons who claim they were injured at the park, asserting the alleged waterpark injuries were "staged."

Louisville's WLKY-TV reports that Kentucky Kingdom CEO Ed Hart believes the pair had "some kind of plan to contrive incidents to get money" from the park. In a lawsuit, Felicia Evans and Brandon McClellan accused the park of negligently allowing them to go down a water slide using an incorrect inner tube.

But what does the theme park have to say about the alleged injuries?

Sometimes when you are injured and your property is damaged, you may not know the identity of the culprit. But just because the person responsible is unknown doesn't mean you can't sue.

The American legal system is actually set up to handle lawsuits where many (or all) of the defendants' identities are a mystery. It may make your case less likely to be a success, but not knowing a name or address isn't a fatal blow to a civil lawsuit.

So how can you still sue if you don't know who injured you?

Two-piece swimsuits at a waterpark, sure. But how about two injury lawsuits?

Kentucky Kingdom's Hurricane Bay is now the subject of two lawsuits alleging that staff allowed patrons to use the wrong inner tube for a particular slide. Louisville's WDRB-TV reports that two patrons, Brandon McClellan and Felicia Evans, have filed suit against Kentucky Kingdom for injuries incurred after falling out of the slide.

Is Kentucky Kingdom liable for these waterpark victims?