Workers' Compensation: Injured
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Workers' Compensation

State law governs most workers' compensation claims. These laws are aimed at protecting workers from injuries sustained on the job. Most states require every business to have some form of workers' compensation insurance to cover its employees. A workers' compensation claim is not considered a lawsuit but rather, is a claim for benefits from the employer. Usually, workers' compensation is the exclusive remedy for workers, unless the worker can point to a third party as a contributing factor in their injury, such as a manufacturer of equipment. There are several types of injuries for which a worker can recover. In some cases, even work-related stress may lead to a valid injury for which a worker can recover.


Recently in Workers' Compensation Category

Wrist injuries may not seem like a big deal at first, but you should know that they can potentially be covered by workers' comp.

According to a 2013 FindLaw.com survey, 20 percent of those injured on the job suffered repetitive motion type injuries -- including wrist injuries like carpal tunnel syndrome. Workers may just accept the pain associated with these injuries as acceptable parts of their jobs, but worker's compensation is typically available.

Consider these points when thinking about claiming workers' comp for your wrist injury:

Workers' compensation is the system that compensates employees who are injured on the job financially without requiring a personal injury lawsuit. But do you need a lawyer to guide you through the process?

The system is set up to be "no fault," meaning that any negligence on the part of the employee or the employer is not at issue. Nevertheless, successfully claiming workers' compensation benefits can be a complicated, frustrating process, especially if your claim is denied.

Working with a workers' compensation attorney may be the best way to ensure that you get the compensation you deserve for your injuries. Here are five things a workers' comp lawyer can do that you probably can't:

Workplace injuries can be caused by a variety of mistakes or omissions, and sometimes the victim feels that he or she is entirely to blame.

And it's not entirely untrue. As this series of Canadian workplace safety PSAs illustrates (in incredibly graphic fashion), an "accident" at work is likely due to a combination of preventable errors on both a supervisor and employee's part.

But even if the employee was largely at fault for the accident, in America, he or she can still potentially be entitled to workers' compensation. Here's why:

When you're injured on the job, keeping you from working, you may think that either workers' comp or disability benefits will keep you afloat.

However, while both of these benefits cover times when an employee may be unable to work, there are significant differences between what each will cover and when you may be eligible.

So should employees seek worker's compensation or disability benefits for workplace injuries? Here are a few things to consider:

If you've been injured at work, you'll probably need compensation. But do you accept workers' compensation or try to sue in civil court?

In most cases you cannot receive workers' comp and sue for your injuries, as workers' comp is intended to substitute for the kind of compensation an injured worker might receive in court. However, each work injury case is different, so it's important for employees to consider their options.

When contemplating whether to sue or collect workers comp, you may want to start with these three considerations:

Workers' compensation is the insurance coverage most employers are required to purchase or provide to compensate employees who are injured in the course of employment. It generally acts as a substitute for a lawsuit against your employer (although in some instances you may still be able to file a lawsuit to recover for workplace injuries).

But just because an employer is typically required to provide workers' compensation coverage doesn't mean that your workers' compensation claim will necessarily be approved.

What should you do if your workers' compensation claim in denied? Here are five first steps to appealing the denial of your claim:

Injured at Work? 3 Potential Options for Recovery

Getting injured at work is a pretty common occurrence, but what are your legal options if you get hurt?

According to a FindLaw.com survey, more than one in five Americans said they've been injured on the job. Workplace injuries not only impact you physically, but it can affect you financially as well.

Here are three potential legal options to seek out if you're injured at work:

What can a disability lawyer do for you that you can't do on your own? Let us count the ways.

When your disability claim has been rejected and you're drowning in medical bills, of if you're just confused about the entire process, you'll want to hire a qualified disability attorney to help you sort out your claims.

Not convinced you need help? Here are five things your disability attorney can do that you (probably) can't:

What Proof Do You Need for a Disability Insurance Claim?

When filing a disability insurance claim, claimants will need to provide proof of their medical conditions.

Depending on your disability insurance policy, the required proof can include things like a doctor's letter and records from the agency that provides the disability benefits.

So here's a rundown of the claim filing process and how to provide proof of disability:

5 Questions to Ask a Disability Lawyer

Disability insurance claims can be complex and are frequently denied (at least initially). A lawyer can help guide you through the process and make it less confusing.

Because disability can be a very personal matter, it's important to choose an experienced disability attorney who fits your needs and is experienced in that area of law. Thankfully, many offer free consultations.

After you scope out a potential attorney (or two), you'll want to find out some basic information about the lawyer and about your claim. Here are five questions to ask a disability lawyer: