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Mother's Day is almost upon us. Instead of overpriced lotions and hastily bought greeting cards, why not help your mom get her legal ducks in a row?

Let's face it, your mother probably already has a mug (or two... or three) that say "World's No. 1 Mom," and flower arrangements will quickly wither. But does your mom have an updated estate plan, an advance directive, or a durable financial power of attorney?

Turn to FindLaw.com for these simple ways to meet your mother's legal needs:

Driving under the influence. It's a common mistake -- one that can carry enormous consequences for your license, your bank account, and perhaps even your freedom.

If you've made the mistake of getting behind the wheel while under the influence of alcohol or drugs, FindLaw.com has a number of online resources to help guide you through the legal system every step of the way.

From your initial traffic stop to your day in court, here are five helpful (and free!) FindLaw resources and how to get the most out of each:

Regardless of which holidays you observed between Thanksgiving and New Year's, you probably inhaled more fattening foods than you'd like to admit and perhaps imbibed a little more spirits than usual. Meanwhile, as the pumpkin pie and gravy works its "magic" on your belly and thighs, your unworn gym shoes continue to mock you from underneath the bed while you struggle just to get up.

So it's understandable that the typical New Year's Resolution involves the commitment to a gym membership. Health clubs tend to get really busy in January for this very reason, returning back to normal when enough newcomers renege on their resolutions (not you, of course!).

But what exactly are you signing up for? Even if you're personally committed to a healthier lifestyle, it's comforting to know that you have certain legal rights and protections with respect to your gym membership. Here are the basics:

Here at FindLaw, we're putting together year-end reports, getting ready for vacations, ... and doing everything we can to clear our calendars so that we have plenty of time at the start of the year to produce quality content for you, our dear readers.

Besides, would you rather handle last year's procrastinated tasks, or next year's resolutions?

Nothing beats a "to-do" list to stop procrastinating. So without further ado, here are a few suggestions for what to put on your "legal to-do" list as the year wraps up:

The FindLaw Answers community is one of our most ambitious projects, providing an open forum for legal professionals to weigh in on legal issues submitted by our very own users.

Since some FindLaw users may not be too familiar with Answers, here are 10 of the most common questions (and, of course, answers) that get at the heart of FindLaw's interactive, information-packed forum:

FindLaw Separates TV Fiction from Legal Fact With 2 New Series

Blame it on television.

For better or for worse, television empowers us to believe that we are knowledgeable and capable. We watch crime dramas, and suddenly we’re experts on forensic evidence. We watch do-it-yourself programs on TLC or HGTV, and we become convinced that we can renovate a home.

But sometimes, it’s best to get a second opinion regarding the reality behind a concept or idea depicted on television. That’s why FindLaw’s new blog series — Legal How-To and Good Wife, Good Law — can help readers distinguish between legal fact and Hollywood fiction.

The April 15 tax deadline is just a few days away, but procrastinators don't need to panic: FindLaw.com has a wide range of resources to make Tax Day less taxing.

It's estimated that about 20% of American adults are chronic procrastinators, one expert tells NPR. That means a significant number of taxpayers are probably in a bit of a predicament right now, and may be trying to calculate their next move.

So how can FindLaw.com help taxpayers with their last-minute preparations? Here are three ways to take advantage of our website's array of offerings without having to deduct too much time out of your day:

About That Holiday Party...

Last week, "20/20" ran a special segment on dos and don'ts at the office holiday party, which included the advice, "Everyone wants the office party to be memorable. Nobody wants to be the reason it was."

In the age of YouTube, office party antics are easily memorialized for posterity ... and for lawsuits. But you don't have to take our word for it. Try searching for "drunk office party" on YouTube. Behold, the casualties.

An employer who hosts an epic holiday party could be liable for his employees' antics. Employees who behave badly at the office party could lose their jobs. And everyone could get sued.

FindLaw Holiday Shopping Tips: The Internet Edition

For many families, Black Friday is part of the Thanksgiving tradition. Whether camping out overnight or waking up early to snag deals, shoppers have spent years bundling up and fighting crowds to get the best holiday buys.

But holiday sales are no longer restricted to Black Friday. Now, stores are offering doorbusters throughout the season to convince customers to shop.

At FindLaw, we have mixed opinions about big box store blowouts. After reading one too many stories about shopping injuries, some of our staffers prefer shopping online for holiday gifts.

Law School is Expensive, But Legal U is Free

There are a lot of legal issues staring us in the face every day. Take, for instance, jury duty. Some people can't wait to receive a jury duty summons. If you're not one of those people -- and it's okay if you're not - maybe you'd like to know exactly what you're getting into.

Let's say you go online to the New York State Unified Court System's jury pool news page. There, you can find the answers to juror-centric crossword puzzles for the last 13 years.

Or, if you want real information, you could turn to FindLaw's Legal U post, "How to 'Do' Jury Duty in New York," and learn how long you're required to be at the courthouse, how much you get paid, and how to delay your duty if you have a scheduling conflict.