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SCOTUS Week at FindLaw

We'll admit it: We're a little bit obsessed with the Supreme Court. And by a little bit, we mean Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Antonin Scalia are our desktop wallpapers. We follow everything the justices do (in their professional capacities -- we're not creepy), so when the Court goes on break for the summer, we feel the void of their absence.

That's why, with the Court's October 2014 Term finally underway, we celebrated in our typical style: by blogging obsessively. For (nearly) every federal circuit, we covered the already granted petitions -- even the incredibly obscure ones -- both for your reading pleasure, and also so that when the Court does issue its decisions, we'll be prepared.

Here's everything from FindLaw's "SCOTUS Week," presented in a massive list:

You may have noticed that it is the Discovery Channel's annual Shark Week. You may have even cared. You may have also heard lawyers referred to as "sharks" once or twice in the 1950s. (Today, we use much less polite terms for attorneys, like ambulance chaser, shyster, or other things that aren't fit to print.)

Ladies and gents of the legal professional persuasion: We present to you FindLaw's "Legal Shark Week II," which wraps up today. What do our legal blog posts have to do with the Discovery Channel? Not a darn thing. But hey, it's a fun theme for blogging.

Take a look at what you may have missed:

#DearFindLaw - Advice for New Lawyers and Law Students from @FindLawLP

One of my favorite things to do is to respond to user-requested topics. Why? For one, it means I don't have to dig for topics. But more importantly, it means, in a small way, we can actually help somebody. (Plus, we know that at least one person will actually read and appreciate the post.)

With that in mind, we've decided to try something new. Introducing #DearFindLaw: an advice column on our Greedy Associates blog where every Friday (beginning this Friday), we'll answer reader-submitted questions regarding anything that might concern new and aspiring attorneys, from LSATs to law firm office gossip.

Of course, to make this work, we need your help.

Hey you. Yeah, you, person who is looking for free legal information. And you, the lawyer perusing cases and codes. Guess what? You're missing out on what some of us here (the bloggers) would say is the best part of FindLaw.com: our blogs.

And we have a lot of them.

Believe it or not, we're blogging all day long, for legal consumers and lawyers alike, about the biggest issues in the industry: notable cases, hilarious slip-ups, business tips for small firms, Kanye West's community service -- you know, the important things. And if you aren't compulsively clicking on our blogs, you're really missing out.

So just how many legal blogs do we have here at FindLaw.com?

Reputation is a difficult thing to control, especially in the digital age. But online tools can help you wrench a good reputation from the jaws of Internet haters.

Since suing over negative reviews has proven to be hit or miss, here are three simple things lawyers can do to take charge of their online reputation:

Some love Valentine's Day. It's a special day for them to celebrate their love, in the form of poems inscribed by hand on cards, sweets for your beloved, and a date night for an overstressed couple, free from work, the kids, etc.

Others see it for what it is: a miserable corporate exploitation of love. A day meant to remind us of our barren love life. Basically, it's Friday.

Here are five other reasons why some of us love to hate Valentine's Day:

Why is an active Twitter presence -- by our Legal Professionals and Consumers brands, and by our writers -- so important to us? And why have we been focusing so much on getting our writers' names out there?

FindLaw's Social Media Specialist Stephen Chang notes that employees have their own network of followers, who may or may not follow the company's account. Tweets coming from personalities, rather than companies, may be more inviting. Plus, you'll have an army of staff members tweeting about on social media, advancing the brand, rather than one man or woman.

Keeping those benefits in mind, FindLaw gave us blog writers a choice: do you want a "Follow the Author" button on your blogs?

Yesterday was a good day: no barking from the dog, no smog, and the ABA Journal finally recognized our law blogs as part of their annual "Blawg 100" list.

To be exact, two of FindLaw's blogs -- Technologist (a blog targeted at tech tips for lawyers and emerging legal and tech issues) and Legally Weird (a repository of idiotic criminals, nonsensical laws, and absurd outcomes) -- were nominated by readers of the American Bar Association's monthly magazine, and are now in the running for the top spots in their categories, "Legal Tech" and "For Fun," respectively.

Now all we need are your votes.

We cover all the angles at FindLaw. From our Learn About the Law section to our consumer-focused legal blogs, we make it our mission to help you understand pressing legal issues -- and if needed, to locate an attorney who can help. As for those attorneys, our legal professional blogs also provide topical content.

So how are we tackling All Hallows' Eve? From Halloween-related hijinks to advice for young lawyers headed to office costume parties, we hit the angles that we feel are most likely to scare resonate with our readers.

Everyone has a bad memory from law school. Our fashionable editor, Tanya Roth, actually listened to the dean's advice and abstained from using commercial outlines in her first year (much to her chagrin). I was stung on the tongue by a bee on the way to Evidence Law. And editor Andrew Chow was once called on in Contracts class and cried (okay, that probably didn't happen).

The point is, we've been there. FindLaw's blog team is staffed by real, live law graduates. We bring our collective expertise, learned lessons from past mistakes, and (sometimes debatable) wit, sarcasm, and creativity to bear on every issue we cover, including the much-dreaded return to law school.