Law and Daily Life - FindLaw Life, Family and Workplace Law Blog

Law & Daily Life - The FindLaw Life, Family and Workplace Law Blog


The big issue in an Illinois divorce case, which has been going on for two years, isn't who gets the family home or custody of children, but rather: Who gets the dog?

Paul Barthel says he merely wants visitation rights with Pepper, the black lab/German shepherd mix that the he and his estranged wife Susan owned together, reports the Chicago Sun-Times. But Susan claims Paul's attempts to win pet visitation rights are merely a ploy to prolong the case and increase her costs. Susan was granted a protective order against Paul, barring him from trying to contact or get near her -- or the dog.

What prompted the protective order, and how does a court decide custody of pets in a divorce?

Obamacare subsidies may not be available to some customers after a federal appellate court redefined the federal government's role in doling out these tax credits.

A three-judge panel of the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled 2-1 Tuesday in Halbig v. Burwell that when the Affordable Care Act authorized the federal government to give subsidies, it only allowed those credits to go to customers who purchased insurance via a state-run insurance exchange. CBS News reports that 36 states rely on "federally-run Obamacare marketplaces," which may be denied subsidies under this new ruling.

What should consumers know about this Obamacare decision?

How do you legally evict a roommate? While the answer depends on your specific situation, there are some general principles to keep in mind.

Although getting a roommate can be a great way to share the costs of renting a house or apartment, sometimes things just don't work out. But similar to when a landlord wants to evict a tenant, you'll want to make sure the law is on your side when considering evicting a roommate. A wrongful eviction may subject you to legal liability, which can be quite costly to resolve.

So how should you evict a roommate? Here are some general guidelines:

Estate planning is a subject some people would rather avoid. After all, making arrangements for what happens to your assets following your own death isn't necessarily a pleasant subject.

But consulting with an experienced estate planning lawyer is something you should consider doing sooner, rather than later. Why?

Here are five reasons you shouldn't wait to call an estate planning lawyer:

Ignoring an unpaid parking ticket can have nasty consequences despite how ridiculous or petty you think the parking offense is.

Unpaid parking tickets, when left unresolved, can cause double or triple fines to be imposed, your car to be towed, and even your license to be suspended.

So don't just shove that parking ticket into your glove box. Here are a few things that can happen when you ignore unpaid parking tickets:

Legalese From A to Z - FindLaw

Do you speak legalese? No, it's not a foreign language (though it may seem foreign at times). Rather, legalese describes the specialized language of the legal profession -- i.e., words only lawyers would use.

Welcome to Legalese From A to Z, a new FindLaw series highlighting the meanings behind some legal terms that may not be familiar to non-lawyers. To kick off the series, we're starting -- where else? -- with five words that begin with the letter "A":

  • Acceleration clause. An acceleration clause is a clause in a loan agreement accelerating the date by which payment in full is due under certain circumstances. For example, an acceleration clause in a mortgage agreement can be triggered -- meaning payment of the remaining balance of the loan will be due -- if the home is sold, title to the property is changed, the loan is refinanced, or if the borrower defaults on the loan.

The U.S. Supreme Court is on summer break for the moment, but its next term begins in October with a handful of very interesting cases.

Beginning October 6, the nation's highest court will hear appeals involving issues of criminal law, prisoner's rights, labor law, class-action claims, and patent law.

Here's a preview of the Supreme Court's first 10 cases of the October 2014 Term:

A Florida judge has ruled the state's ban on gay marriage is unconstitutional, but it doesn't mean same-sex nuptials can occur in the Sunshine State just yet.

Monroe County Circuit Judge Luis M. Garcia on Thursday ruled in favor of Aaron R. Huntsman and William Lee Jones after they applied for and were denied a marriage license in April. Judge Garcia's ruling overturned the state's prohibition on gay marriage, but it may not take effect until Tuesday, reports the Orlando Sentinel.

Does this mean Florida will soon be the 20th state to allow gay marriage?

What should you bring to your divorce consultation?

Before you hire a divorce attorney, you'll likely have a consultation during which the attorney can size up your case and answer your questions. But you shouldn't arrive to your divorce consultation empty-handed, otherwise your potential attorney may have little to say about your case.

Come prepared to your divorce consultation with at least these five things:

For the first time in more than 30 years, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has issued new federal guidelines about workplace pregnancy discrimination.

The EEOC's new guidelines follow an increase in complaints of pregnant workers being discriminated against over the last decade, reports The New York Times. The guidance also comes as the U.S. Supreme Court prepares to hear a workplace pregnancy-discrimination case during its upcoming term in October.

So what do current and future moms need to know about the new guidelines?