Law & Daily Life - The FindLaw Life, Family and Workplace Law Blog


Just the thought of getting served with an eviction notice is scary for most people. Fortunately, landlords are not allowed to use self-help, such as changing the locks, making living conditions unbearable, or threats of force, to evict a tenant. Additionally, most states and cities have specific procedures that must be followed for an eviction to be valid.

Unfortunately for tenants, most cities do not have strong rent control protections like in San Francisco or Toronto. This means that in most places, after a lease term has ended, or is on a month to month basis, so long as a landlord follows the law, a tenant can be rightfully evicted with relative ease.

Here are the top three do's and don't's to follow if you've received an eviction notice.

You just got done filing your taxes (hopefully), so the last thing you're probably thinking about is filing them next year. But if President Donald Trump has anything to say about it, your tax filing in 2018 may look a lot different than your 2016 filing.

The Trump administration unveiled a dramatic overhaul of the nation's tax code today, including lowering the rates for some individuals and businesses and eliminating some state and local tax breaks. What will that mean for you? And what could the changes mean long-term?

When there's a death in the family, the last thing anyone wants is a big fight over the deceased's property and assets. Unfortunately, when it comes to money and inheritances, relatives can quickly turn to bitter enemies.

However, there are few things a person can do to potentially help stop relatives from spending the funeral and grieving period fighting over who gets what. Here are three tips on how to minimize inheritance fights between relatives.

Between credit cards, mortgages, and medical bills, many Americans face a seemingly insurmountable amount of debt. And while most of us don't like to think about bailing on that responsibility, sometimes bankruptcy can be our last and only option.

There are different options when it comes to filing for bankruptcy, and one of the most often used in personal bankruptcy is known as Chapter 7. And if you're considering whether Chapter 7 is right for you, a big part of that answer will come down to how much it costs to file. So here's a look:

Thanks to the internet and those blessed meme things, many employees live by the meme-philosophy: Boss makes a dollar, I make a dime, that’s why I poop on company time. However, under the law, employers are legally allowed to restrict bathroom breaks, at least, within reason.

Generally, reasonable restrictions will not prohibit employees from using the restroom when the need arises. However, in production, or client facing industries, employers may require an employee to wait for a co-worker to relieve their position before taking a bathroom break. Additionally, if an employee has a medical condition that necessitates frequent bathroom breaks, employers may need to be flexible as frequent bathroom breaks is an easily achievable reasonable accommodation in nearly all situations.

School safety can be a controversial subject. Although everyone agrees that safe schools are important and essential in every community, not everyone agrees on how to achieve safe schools. Zero tolerance policies began emerging in the 1980s and 90s in response to the increased efforts in the government's war on drugs, as well as part of the Gun Free Schools Act.

Over time, many schools expanded their zero tolerance policies to include other behaviors including fighting, or possessing drugs or alcohol, and even less serious offenses. After the tragic Columbine shooting in 1999, many more schools started instituting zero tolerance policies for students caught carrying weapons. However, now that there is decades of data for researchers to review and analyze, zero tolerance policies have come under the microscope.

Last week, United States Attorney General Jeff Sessions said that he was "amazed that a judge sitting on an island in the Pacific can issue an order" halting President Donald's Trump ban on immigration from six Muslim-majority countries. Despite Sessions' newfound wonder at the concept of judicial review and checks and balances in the federal government (not to mention the vast geographical limits of the country), several courts have found Trump's travel ban unconstitutional, both in its initial iteration in February and its revamped version in March.

Two federal circuit courts have put temporary injunctions in place, prohibiting the federal government from enforcing Trump's "Executive Order Protecting The Nation From Foreign Terrorist Entry Into The United States." So when will those reviews happen, and what could happen next?

ICE, or Immigration and Customs Enforcement, is the federal agency tasked with enforcing US immigration laws. This means that individuals who are suspected of violating immigration laws may eventually get stopped by an ICE agent or officer.

ICE often conducts random roadside checkpoints and targeted raids to arrest and deport immigrants who do not have proper documentation. Frequently, ICE will obtain an arrest warrant, just like regular law enforcement, for a single individual or group of individuals. However, when any person is arrested, even by ICE, civil rights don’t just vanish.

Below you’ll find the three most important rights to keep in mind if you are stopped by an ICE agent or officer.

Being the victim of theft is an awful experience. On top of having something literally taken away, a victim can often be left feeling traumatized. Typically, when a person is robbed, or discovers something has been stolen from them, contacting the police is the first step.

If you know the perpetrator, depending on the specific facts of the situation, you may not want to involve police. However, failing to involve the police will put you at a serious disadvantage when it comes to recovering your stolen money or property. Although you can pursue a civil action against the thief for the return of your property, a criminal action can be resolved much quicker, and net the same result at no expense to you.

When an employer or boss has a ‘favorite,’ it can create real tension in the workplace. The term itself is highly subjective, and even somewhat offensively whimsical. Even if it is based on objective performance criterion, declaring a favorite rather than a top performer is demoralizing and cheapens employees’ performances and accomplishments.

Unfortunately for workers, workplaces can be downright awful. But that’s just one of the facts of life. To make matters worse, unless you’re being sexually harassed, discriminated against, or physically attacked, there sometimes can be very little a person can do without risking job security. Even where legal protections exist, there’s still no real job security, as retaliation happens with alarming frequency. Suing isn’t really a solution, but rather a remedy, which frequently isn’t going to be available.