Law and Daily Life - FindLaw Life, Family and Workplace Law Blog

Law & Daily Life - The FindLaw Life, Family and Workplace Law Blog


As the U.S. Supreme Court prepares for the opening conference of its October 2014 term, the Court is set to consider whether or not to hear cases from five states dealing with the constitutionality of same-sex marriage bans.

The cases -- from Wisconsin, Utah, Virginia, Oklahoma, and Indiana -- will be among the first cases considered by the Court when justices meet on September 29, reports USA Today.

Does this mean the Supreme Court is going to rule on the constitutionality of state bans on same-sex marriage?

Legalese From A to Z - FindLaw

It's time for another installment of Legalese From A to Z, explaining the plain-English meanings of some common (and some uncommon) legal terms that non-lawyers may find confusing.

What is legalese? It's the specialized language of the legal profession -- words typically used only in legal documents and in court. Here are five legalese terms you may not know that begin with the letter "I":

Moving to the Golden State? Just visiting? Or maybe you've been a California native all your life.

California has a rich legal history, and because of it, the state has a unique set of laws. So before you decide to join the Raider Nation and grab some In-N-Out on the way to the beach, check out these 10 laws you'll want to know if you're in California:

Angry and frustrated at your employer? Ready to make them pay by going to the public library and studying up on wage and hour laws? Hold on there, slick.

Before you go barreling into a legal bout with your boss over the overtime you weren't paid for and the unpaid time you were forced to work, try and consider all the ways an attorney could do it better.

For starters, here are five things a wage and hour lawyer can do that a non-lawyer probably can't:

Advanced directives are legal documents allowing you to express your wishes regarding your medical treatment in the event that you are incapacitated and unable to make decisions yourself. But along with living wills and durable powers of attorney, there's another form of advanced directive that may be useful for long-term planning: the psychiatric advance directive.

What can a psychiatric advance directive do? Here's a general overview:

Waiting in line at the airport can be a soul-sucking experience, but not following the rules can land you in serious legal trouble. Fortunately, there are ways to "skip" the lines and be on the level.

One of them was released just a month ago: a free iPhone app which allows travelers passing through Atlanta's Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport to blow through customs like a hot, carefree wind. And the winds of change are blowing with regard to air travel.

Be stuck in airport-line doldrums no longer with these three legal ways to "skip" lines at the airport:

It's a love story that seems too good to be true: Two nonagenarians, alone in their later years, get married after a chance meeting in line for lottery tickets.

But as it turns out, it may indeed be too good to true -- or at least to be legal. The bride, 96-year-old widow Edith Hill, was declared mentally incapacitated several years ago, reports The Associated Press. And now a Virginia judge -- who called her marriage to 95-year-old widower Eddie Harrison "improper" -- has appointed an attorney as Hill's guardian. The lawyer's task: to determine whether the marriage is in Hill's best interest.

Why is this elderly couple's seemingly storybook marriage being subjected to such legal scrutiny?

Wondering whether or not you should you sue your relative?

Everybody fights with their family from time to time. But what if a family dispute gets to the point where you're considering taking legal action and filing a lawsuit against a family member? There are several ways in which lawsuit involving family members may differ from those involving strangers or even those with professional or social relationships.

Here are five things to consider before suing your relative:

A Colorado man who was fired for using medical marijuana is taking his case to the state's supreme court.

Brandon Coats, a former phone operator at Dish Network, was fired by the company after he tested positive for marijuana. Despite being a quadriplegic and a medical marijuana patient, the Colorado Court of Appeals ruled in April 2013 that despite state law, Dish Network could still fire Coats for having prescribed pot in his system.

Coats has appealed to Colorado's highest court. What arguments might the court need to consider?

If you are involved in a domestic dispute, you may find yourself served with a temporary restraining order.

A temporary restraining order (TRO) is a court order directing an individual to do or not do specific acts for a specific time period, generally until a court hearing regarding issuing a permanent order. TROs are typically used to prohibit someone from making contact or coming near a specific person, although they can also include a range of other directives, such as continuing to pay certain bills or to refrain from possessing a firearm.

What should you do if you are served with a TRO? Here are five steps you'll want to consider: