Law and Daily Life - FindLaw Life, Family and Workplace Law Blog

Law & Daily Life - The FindLaw Life, Family and Workplace Law Blog


When will lawyers answer questions for free? The lawyerly answer is, "It depends."

For example, we here at FindLaw strive to provide free daily analysis of legal questions that confront Americans in their everyday lives. And many of our writers (including yours truly) are attorneys.

But aside from FindLaw, how can you get free answers to your pressing legal inquiries? Here are several instances you can get licensed legal minds to answer your questions, without paying a dime:

Legalese From A to Z - FindLaw

Welcome to the second installment of our new Sunday blog series, Legalese From A to Z.

As part of this continuing series, we'll be taking a closer look at legal terminology that may be unfamiliar to non-lawyers. We started last week with the letter "A," so today we take on five legal terms that begin with the letter "B":

When out in nature, you may feel the urge to feed any wild animals you might encounter.

However, as your legal guides through the forest of state and federal laws, we strongly encourage you to resist that temptation. Not only is this practice bad for the animals you feed, but your "kindness" by feeding wildlife can potentially lead to your arrest.

Here are some general rules about when it is and isn't legal to feed wild animals:

Absinthe has long been rumored to be illegal in the United States, yet brands like Lucid and St. George openly sell their absinthe products in liquor stores across the nation. So why all the hubbub about absinthe?

The liquor traditionally made from wormwood has a murky legal history in the United States and abroad, which has led absinthe producers to only recently begin marketing to Americans.

Acknowledging this background, is absinthe legal?

One North Carolina school district is going to great lengths to monitor its students' social media habits, paying thousands to a third party to scan students' posts.

Jackson County Schools are contracting with Social Sentinel Inc. in a pilot project that will use computer algorithms to scan student social media posts for safety or security threats, reports The Sylva Herald. The program will be launched at Smoky Mountain High School in Sylva this fall, and will cost $9,500 for the first year.

But will students be paying the price in privacy?

July 24 is National Cousins Day, a day to celebrate and reflect on the strong relationships between cousins. However, the law doesn't hold some relations between cousins in such high esteem; indeed, some may even be criminal. Marriage or sex, for example, may be completely out of the question.

So on this National Cousins Day, here are three things you should know about relationships between cousins:

The big issue in an Illinois divorce case, which has been going on for two years, isn't who gets the family home or custody of children, but rather: Who gets the dog?

Paul Barthel says he merely wants visitation rights with Pepper, the black lab/German shepherd mix that the he and his estranged wife Susan owned together, reports the Chicago Sun-Times. But Susan claims Paul's attempts to win pet visitation rights are merely a ploy to prolong the case and increase her costs. Susan was granted a protective order against Paul, barring him from trying to contact or get near her -- or the dog.

What prompted the protective order, and how does a court decide custody of pets in a divorce?

Obamacare subsidies may not be available to some customers after a federal appellate court redefined the federal government's role in doling out these tax credits.

A three-judge panel of the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled 2-1 Tuesday in Halbig v. Burwell that when the Affordable Care Act authorized the federal government to give subsidies, it only allowed those credits to go to customers who purchased insurance via a state-run insurance exchange. CBS News reports that 36 states rely on "federally-run Obamacare marketplaces," which may be denied subsidies under this new ruling.

What should consumers know about this Obamacare decision?

How do you legally evict a roommate? While the answer depends on your specific situation, there are some general principles to keep in mind.

Although getting a roommate can be a great way to share the costs of renting a house or apartment, sometimes things just don't work out. But similar to when a landlord wants to evict a tenant, you'll want to make sure the law is on your side when considering evicting a roommate. A wrongful eviction may subject you to legal liability, which can be quite costly to resolve.

So how should you evict a roommate? Here are some general guidelines:

Estate planning is a subject some people would rather avoid. After all, making arrangements for what happens to your assets following your own death isn't necessarily a pleasant subject.

But consulting with an experienced estate planning lawyer is something you should consider doing sooner, rather than later. Why?

Here are five reasons you shouldn't wait to call an estate planning lawyer: