Law & Daily Life - The FindLaw Life, Family and Workplace Law Blog


Litigation can be time-consuming and expensive. And when it comes to divorce, those are two things you probably want to avoid. So how can divorcing couples avoid the lengthy court calendar and extensive filing fees?

One option is divorce mediation, where both parties sit down with an independent mediator in a less formal setting, as opposed to appearing before a judge in a courtroom. But even if you determine that mediation is right for you (and your spouse agrees), how do you figure out which mediator is right for your divorce? Here are a few tips:

Many parents think that child support ends when a child turns 18 or graduates high school. And most of those parents would be right. But a few of them may be shocked to learn that they are also on the hook for post-secondary child support, also known as "college tuition."

Certain states allow courts to award post-secondary or post-minority support beyond the age of majority (18 in most states). So how are these awards determined?

Should I Hire a Forensic Accountant for My Divorce?

If you're involved in high asset divorce, you may have a hard time understanding exactly what's at stake, financially speaking. That's why you may need to hire someone qualified in this exact area. Even if you already have an experienced divorce attorney, you may consider hiring a forensic accountant to make sure your assets are accounted for and protected.

Forensic accountants who are experienced in divorce proceedings are typically hired either directly by a party to the divorce, or by an attorney representing one spouse. An accountant provides a financial analysis to assist with the divorce process, particularly in marriages where one or both spouses hold significant assets. They are typically a Certified Public Accountant, with specialized skill sets unique to the profession, including conducting investigations that extend beyond the typical alimony and child support calculations that are conducted by a divorce attorney.

It's been over two years since the Supreme Court recognized the right of same-sex couples to marry, yet some state officials have been dragging their feet recognizing the inherent rights that follow the right to marry. Former Alabama Supreme Court Justice Roy Moore famously ordered state probate judges to cease issuing marriage certificates for same-sex couples. (Moore was suspended from the court and ultimately resigned.) Other states were slow to recognize child custody and visitation rights of same-sex parents.

In Arkansas, birth certificates have become an issue for children of same-sex couples. Here's a look at what this issue is all about.

We all know to call 911 in an emergency. But some of us may be hard of hearing or speech impaired, and some emergencies don't allow for a safe phone call conversation with police dispatchers. So this week, Los Angeles County rolled out its "Text-to-911" service, giving Burbank, Glendale, Long Beach, and Los Angeles residents the ability to text 911 in the case of an emergency.

But texting 911 is not meant to entirely replace calling 911 as the primary contact for emergency services, and there are some caveats to texting 911. Here's what you need to know.

In recent years, many, if not all states have proposed drug testing applicants for and recipients of public assistance programs. Despite recent evidence that welfare applicants test positive for drugs at a rate far below the national average (and that the cost of drug screening welfare recipients far outweighs the savings of denying welfare access to drug users), legislation requiring some form of drug testing for public assistance recipients proliferates.

The legality of this legislation may depend on the assistance program involved and the screening required. Here's a look.

As we warned three years ago, the IRS considers Bitcoin and other digital currencies to be property for taxation purposes. Meaning buyers, sellers, and traders of virtual currencies may need to pay real taxes on those transactions.

If you haven't been reporting those gains or losses on tour tax returns, you might be in for a rude awakening come April. The IRS just gained access to information on over 10,000 users of Coinbase, a digital currency exchange.

A spouse's emotional abuse can be psychologically and physically damaging, and may be the reason you're seeking a divorce. But will a judge look less favorably on your abuser if your divorce goes to court?

Perhaps not when deciding how to split the marital assets. Thanks to the concept of "no-fault" divorce, now available in all 50 states, that allows either spouse to pursue a divorce for any reason, it doesn't much matter who's at fault in the split.

But some states still allow you to file a "fault" divorce, in which emotional abuse may play a role. And evidence of emotional abuse can have an effect on child custody decisions. Here's how emotional abuse can factor into your divorce case:

The holidays are generally a time when families come together. But for separated or divorced parents, the holidays can make it feel like everything is falling apart. Child custody issues can arise at any time, but with travel and other family members involved, the holidays can make those issues even more difficult to deal with.

So here are five legal tips for dealing with child custody issues during the holidays, from our archives:

We often look to our parents as our models for child rearing. When we have children of our own, we look back on our own upbringing and often think, "Well I turned out alright -- my parents did a good job." So we take parenting advice from our parents.

The only problem with that is that times change, as do laws. Back in the day, parents often used a little whiskey or rum to quiet their crying babies, car seats for children were optional, and even doctors didn't seem to mind if pregnant women smoked. Most of that wouldn't fly these days, but some other advice we got from our parents might be downright illegal now. Here's a look: