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Sallie Mae, a company that has faced numerous lawsuits for predatory and discriminatory lending practices to students, has found a new target for school loan debt: students' parents. It's a smart ploy from the lender/debt-collector -- why saddle young, unproven, and possibly unemployed kids with debt when you can put it on older and employed versions that are more likely to pay it back?

So if you just got done paying off your student loans, and are feeling that empty nest melancholy double whammy of no kids in the house and no loans on the books, fear not. Sallie Mae has a way for you to continue paying off student debt for maybe your whole life.

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On Avoiding Bankruptcy: 5 Financial Tips

When times get tough, the tough sometimes want to indulge in a little shopping. But retail therapy and reactive spending can be big contributors to a personal credit crunch.

There are things you can do to remain financially healthy if you're not now in trouble and to avoid bankruptcy if you're on the brink. If you start thinking carefully about expenses, you can bring yourself back from the edge of financial disaster without too much pain and a lot of gain.

While getting a school loan is fairly simple, paying off that loan is another matter entirely. And discharging the loan through bankruptcy? That's rarer than a unicorn.

Or so we thought. While the prevailing wisdom has been that you are stuck with federal student loans until you pay them off, some new cases might be indicating there are ways out for debtors that can't afford their student loans. One such exit is the often overlooked "borrower defense" provision. Does it apply to you?

Being in debt can be a scary place -- especially when a creditor starts taking a piece of your paycheck. In some cases, creditors could be taking so much you can no longer afford to pay other bills, sending you deeper into debt.

It turns out you may have some options if you need to end or alter wage garnishment, including filing for an exemption or getting the debt vacated entirely.

For many couples, unfortunately, bankruptcy and divorce go hand in hand.

The statistics are quite discouraging and telling. Nearly 50 percent of marriages end in divorce. Of those, 22 percent of divorces are caused by money issues or disagreements about how to spend money.

If you and your spouse are contemplating bankruptcy and divorce, should you file for one before the other? Does it matter?

The accumulated student loan debt for all Americans is nearly $1.3 trillion, and rising by the second. And these aren't just people seeking advanced degrees like law and medicine -- some 40 million Americans have some student debt.

For many of those who owe money for their education, making payments on those loans is difficult, if not impossible. So what can you do if you can't pay your student loans?

The U.S. Supreme Court has a busy March to look forward to, with 12 cases scheduled for oral arguments.

With Confederate license plates, environmental regulations, criminal procedure questions, and patent cases on the docket, there's something here for everyone:

The U.S. Supreme Court is hearing six cases in the last week of February. The cases touch on issues including alleged religious discrimination by a clothing store, performance bonuses from courts to attorneys, and whether a firearms offender can sell his confiscated guns.

If you like to keep an eye on the highest court in the land, this is what you have to look forward to:

Supreme Court Calendar: 10 Cases to Watch in January

The U.S. Supreme Court returns from its winter break to hear 10 cases in January, starting today.

Many of the High Court's cases this month will deal with statutory interpretation, but a few deal with polemical issues like free speech, housing discrimination, and unlawful searches.

Here's what Court watchers have to look forward to this month: