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Few things are as infuriating as a delayed flight, and cancelled flights can be downright enraging, especially around the holidays. If your flight has been cancelled, you may be looking to take out that rage on the airline, in court.

Unfortunately, airlines don't guarantee their schedules and the fine print on your ticket (or email confirmation) usually means you can't sue for a cancelled flight. But that doesn't mean you can't or won't be compensated, and you may have some legal rights if your flight was cancelled.

Retraining, protective, or stay away orders can arise in a multitude of situations, from business arguments to domestic disputes. And fighting a restraining order can take many forms, depending on the type of order involved and the particular circumstances of your case.

Most restraining orders are orders from a court, and therefore can be appealed. It may not be easy to get a restraining order amended or overturned, but it's not impossible. Here's what you need to know if you're appealing a restraining order.

Trending Questions From FindLaw Answers

You've got questions ... we've got answers. If you have not yet asked or answered a question in FindLaw's Answers community, what are you waiting for? This amazing free resource supports a dynamic community of legal consumers and attorneys helping each other out. Simple as that.

We see a lot of great questions in our Answers community every day. Here's a look at some of the most commented on questions lately from our FindLaw Answers boards:

Can prosecutors try and pick an all-white jury? Can you sue a company for breaking the law, even if it didn't hurt you in the process? And can alleged criminals use legitimate assets to get a lawyer? These questions, and more, will get argued in front of the Supreme Court next month.

The Court will hear a total of twelve cases in November -- here are the three biggest that you need to know about:

Do I Have to Respond to a Lawsuit?

You've been served with a summons and complaint. If you just ignore it, will it go away? Unfortunately not. You do have to respond to the lawsuit. If you ignore this problem, you risk losing the case by default.

Deadlines to respond vary depending on the context of the case, your location, and whether the case is filed in federal or state court. But usually you have 20 to 30 days to file an answer. Failure to respond altogether could result in a default judgment, meaning the court determines that the opposition wins based on its filings exclusively.

Maybe you got into a fender bender abroad. Maybe you blogged about a foreign national and they're not happy with what you wrote. Maybe an ex is filing for divorce from another country.

Whatever the case may be, it is possible to be sued in a foreign country. So what does that mean for you?

Welcome to the new FindLaw series, "If I Find," where we'll discuss the rule of finders keepers as it applies to different topics. We hope you'll check back regularly!

What's that black sludge puddling up in your back yard? ... Oil?

Congratulations, you're rich! Or, are you? Finding oil on your property may feel like striking liquid gold and winning the jackpot. However, it may not be a sure fact that you'll make any money off of it. Be careful, because it may not even belongs to you.

If you find oil in your back yard, is it yours?

Chances are, you've driven over a bridge at least once or twice in your life. Have you ever thought about the idea of it collapsing and plunging your car down 50, 70, 100 feet?

Recently, a bridge on I-10 connecting California and Arizona collapsed due to heavy rain and erosion. Luckily, nobody died. One car and its driver did crash because of the collapse, but the driver survived with some injuries. The main impact of the bridge collapse is the millions of dollars it will cost to repair the collapsed section, and millions more lost as traffic on the busy highway must be re-routed.

When a bridge collapses, who is liable for damages?

This year, Disneyland is going all out for its Diamond celebration.

While Disney was busy making kids' dreams come true for the past 60 years, it was also spending much of that time defending itself against one lawsuit after another. In honor of Disney's Diamond celebration, here is a roundup of the best, funniest, and saddest lawsuits against Disneyland:

Of all the things parents worry about when their kids take out the family car, civil liability is pretty far down the list. We just want our kids to come home safe.

But if your child gets into an accident with the family car, who’s responsible for the damage or injuries? And does it matter if they were out joyriding or driving with your permission? Perhaps unsurprisingly, there’s an entire legal concept dedicated to just this scenario.