Civil Lawsuits News - Law and Daily Life
Law & Daily Life - The FindLaw Life, Family and Workplace Law Blog

Recently in Civil Lawsuits Category

When you leave the country, you don't necessarily leave all your potential legal troubles behind.

Whether you're traveling abroad for an extended period or have moved overseas permanently, legal issues back in the United States may require your attention. But how can you handle legal matters while you're out of the country?

Fortunately, you may be able to take care of matters without having to book an international flight. Here are a few tips to consider:

Pennsylvania was one of the original 13 colonies, and if you're in the Keystone State, you should be familiar with its rich history of laws.

While learning about the life of the Founding Fathers is a great way to enjoy the history of Pennsylvania, you may also want to focus on the present laws that will have a slightly more pressing effect.

Get ready for an updated page of Poor Richard's Almanac, with 10 laws you should know if you're in present-day Pennsylvania:

Cease-and-desist letters are often ignored, but that doesn't mean legal consequences won't follow.

While these letters have no real legal effect, failing to respond or follow up on a cease-and-desist letter may lead to some predictable responses from the sender. And while some cease-and-desist letters are simply legal-sounding huffing and puffing, others are the harbingers of potentially ruinous and costly lawsuits.

So what can happen if you ignore a cease-and-desist letter? Here are a few possibilities:

Illinois is more than just home to Chicago, it's practically the center of culture for the Midwest. But you won't be able to fully appreciate that spirit if you don't know the laws of the Prairie State.

Northwestern students know better than to hit the road without obeying Illinois' DUI laws, and we think even Al Capone knew how his estate might be split up.

Don't visit or set up roots in the Land of Lincoln without learning more about these 10 laws:

Florida is a great place to raise a family, vacation, or even retire. But you'd be a fool to do any of the above without knowing at least some of the Sunshine State's laws.

Don't even think about passing down that "Golden Girls"-style South Beach pad without first learning if your will is valid under Florida law. And while you may have the pants and the look of "Miami Vice," you should probably know the DUI laws before you hit the road.

To make your Florida fantasy a legal reality, check out these 10 laws you should know:

"Cease and desist" has a commanding and alarming ring to it, one that makes recipients of cease-and-desist letters quake in their figurative boots.

But there's really nothing magical or legally damning about a cease-and-desist letter. Often they are just a cheap way for one party's lawyers to shock or bully another party into "ceasing" or "desisting" without actually filing suit.

Don't be fooled by angry words in legalese. Here's how to decipher a cease-and-desist letter:

Lawyers can seem "all that" during a consultation, but potential clients may want to do a little extra research before pulling the trigger on hiring them.

Just a quick trip over to the lawyer's website or state bar profile can reveal information that he or she may not have disclosed. In addition, ranking-and-review websites like Yelp provide oodles of sensitive information on attorneys from past clients.

So if you're curious, use these five quick ways to research whether your lawyer is legit:

Wondering whether or not you should you sue your relative?

Everybody fights with their family from time to time. But what if a family dispute gets to the point where you're considering taking legal action and filing a lawsuit against a family member? There are several ways in which lawsuit involving family members may differ from those involving strangers or even those with professional or social relationships.

Here are five things to consider before suing your relative:

You may think an email message is the "smoking gun" in your case, and you'd like to use it as evidence. But legally, it isn't always as easy as bringing a printed-out copy of an important email to court.

The rules of evidence may require that the email be authenticated and to be introduced in a way that doesn't violate the general prohibition on hearsay evidence.

With these concerns in mind, here are a few tips on how to use email as evidence:

The U.S. Supreme Court is on summer break for the moment, but its next term begins in October with a handful of very interesting cases.

Beginning October 6, the nation's highest court will hear appeals involving issues of criminal law, prisoner's rights, labor law, class-action claims, and patent law.

Here's a preview of the Supreme Court's first 10 cases of the October 2014 Term: