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Alaska has become the latest state to have its gay marriage ban overturned by a federal judge, following a major decision by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals.

On Sunday, U.S. District Court Judge Timothy Burgess found that Alaska's gay marriage ban violated the Due Process and Equal Protection clauses of the Fourteenth Amendment of the Constitution, and ordered all state agents to not enforce the law. CNN reports that Alaska Gov. Sean Parnell announced his intention to appeal the court's ruling, citing his "duty to defend and uphold the law and the Alaska Constitution."

What is the state of gay marriage now?

Idaho and Nevada's gay marriage bans were struck down by a federal appellate court Tuesday, making same-sex marriage in five more states that much closer to reality.

The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that gay marriage bans in both Idaho and Nevada violated same-sex couples' rights to equal protection under the Fourteenth Amendment, reports The Associated Press. Not only did the laws deny gays and lesbians the right to marry, but they did not meet the higher level of scrutiny applied to laws that discriminate based on sexual orientation, the court found.

How did the 9th Circuit come to strike down Idaho and Nevada's gay marriage laws?

The U.S. Supreme Court passed on hearing appeals in five states' gay marriage cases on Monday, leaving same-sex marriage legal in about half of U.S. states.

Utah, Virginia, Oklahoma, Wisconsin, and Indiana will now start implementing the effects of their gay marriage appeals being denied, in some cases beginning to marry gay couples within hours of the High Court's decision.

Even if you don't live in one of these states, here are five things you should know:

Yours truly is a Texas native, but we won't blame you if you're just arriving or simply here to visit. What Texans won't appreciate is someone who's clueless about the laws in the Lone Star State.

So before your Southwest flight lands, check out these 10 laws you should know if you're in Texas:

The First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution prohibits the government from "abridging the freedom of speech." But what does this freedom of speech encompass?

Unfortunately (or fortunately, depending on how you look at it), freedom of speech doesn't necessarily mean you can say whatever you want whenever you want to.

When might your freedom of speech be limited? Here are five examples:

As we celebrate Constitution Day here at FindLaw, we like to reflect on how much (or how little) the average person actually knows about his or her constitutional rights.

Sure you may be able to list off some of the amendments in the Bill of Rights, but do you know how free speech actually applies? Or the right to a jury of your peers?

Test your constitutional mettle with these five challenging questions:

As the U.S. Supreme Court prepares for the opening conference of its October 2014 term, the Court is set to consider whether or not to hear cases from five states dealing with the constitutionality of same-sex marriage bans.

The cases -- from Wisconsin, Utah, Virginia, Oklahoma, and Indiana -- will be among the first cases considered by the Court when justices meet on September 29, reports USA Today.

Does this mean the Supreme Court is going to rule on the constitutionality of state bans on same-sex marriage?

You may think that "support animals" are just another name from "service animals," but there's a fine legal distinction.

A recent federal court decision put a fine point on the difference in a man's legal battle with a Florida homeowner's association. His HOA's "no pet" policy couldn't be applied to the man's service animal because service animals are not pets -- especially when they are trained to address a condition like PTSD.

So when is an animal a "service animal" and when is it a "support animal"?

Wisconsin and Indiana gay couples were vindicated today by a Seventh Circuit ruling that found both states' gay marriage bans unconstitutional.

In a unanimous decision, the federal appellate court found that neither state was able to provide a rational basis for the same-sex marriage prohibition, leaving it to unconstitutionally deny gay couples equal protection of the laws. The Associated Press notes that with this new decision, the number of states with legalized gay marriage jumps from 19 to 21.

What else is important about this gay marriage decision?

Louisiana's gay marriage ban has been upheld in a federal court, bucking a year-long trend of federal rulings against same-sex marriage bans.

In Robicheaux v. Caldwell, U.S. District Court Judge Martin L. C. Feldman ruled Wednesday that Louisiana's prohibition on gay marriage did not violate same-sex couples' constitutional rights because the law implicates no fundamental rights and has a rational basis. As noted by The Huffington Post, Judge Feldman is the first federal judge to uphold a gay marriage ban since the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling in Windsor in 2013.

Why did Louisiana's gay marriage ban get upheld when so many others have been struck down?