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The U.S. Supreme Court is on summer break for the moment, but its next term begins in October with a handful of very interesting cases.

Beginning October 6, the nation's highest court will hear appeals involving issues of criminal law, prisoner's rights, labor law, class-action claims, and patent law.

Here's a preview of the Supreme Court's first 10 cases of the October 2014 Term:

Repossessing a car isn't a pleasant task, but knowing the correct legal steps can at least make it an efficient one.

When your car buyer defaults on his or her payments, you need to be smart about how you proceed to get your car back. If you fail to follow the rules or things get out of hand, you could potentially face civil liability or even criminal charges.

To repo your car the smart and law-abiding way, here's a quick legal how-to:

Americans really hate airline fees, a new FindLaw.com survey reveals. And who can blame them?

Airlines are increasingly charging fees for services that were once included in the typical flight experience. Nowadays, some airlines are charging for carry-on bags, and even for window and aisle seats.

So just how many Americans hate these add-on airline fees, and is there anything consumers can do about them?

Contracts are some of the most ubiquitous legal documents in our modern society, and the average person doesn't know half of the problems they can cause.

Before you decide to sign that agreement, contract, or waiver, consider how much information you're missing out on -- info that a contract lawyer could provide.

Don't believe us? Here are five things a contracts lawyer can do that you probably can't:

Noncompete clauses are fairly common in work contracts, but they have a habit of sneaking up on former employees.

Take Colette Buser, a 19-year-old college student with years of summer camp experience, who was seemingly barred from working at any camp in Massachusetts because of her contract with her prior employer. You typically think of these sorts of contract issues affecting high-level managers and investment brokers, but as The New York Times reports, these noncompete clauses are increasingly required of employees in any industry.

So is the noncompete clause in your work contract legal?

There's a new trend emerging in prenups: social media restrictions. After you and your spouse enter blissful matrimony, a social media prenup could potentially be used to prevent embarrassing or "ugly" pictures of you from being posted on Facebook or Instagram.

This definitely sounds like a lawyerly solution to a first-world problem. But should you consider a social media prenup?

Selling your car can be a hassle, but you can save yourself a good deal of frustration by avoiding some common legal mistakes.

Yes, it's difficult to get a buyer interested enough to purchase your car without all the extra legal mumbo-jumbo, but you still want to protect yourself in the process.

Check out these five easy legal mistakes to avoid:

Want to play the ponies at the Kentucky Derby or at a racetrack closer to home? If so, knowing some general horse-betting laws can pay off.

Betting on horses is one of America's oldest forms of gambling. But before you sip your mint julep and place your bet, check out these five legal facts about betting on horse races:

Be more careful with your Facebook "likes" -- they may block you from suing a company.

Critics of General Mills' newest legal terms believe that you may lose your right to sue the company simply by pressing "like" on its corporate Facebook page. The New York Times reports that the cereal maker may be the first major food company to seek "forced arbitration" on customers, removing their abilities to seek remedies in court.

Here are a few reasons to think twice before you "like" a company or brand:

With the new season of "Game of Thrones" set to premiere Sunday, HBO subscribers may be wondering: Can you legally share your HBO Go password with friends and family?

If you take HBO's CEO at his word, the premium cable TV company doesn't care if you do -- as long as it keeps viewers hooked on its programming.

Even if HBO looks the other way, is it technically legal to share your HBO Go password?