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Most of us aren't employed as lawyers, but that doesn't mean employment laws don't impact our jobs every day. And while you don't have to be a legal expert in order to protect your rights at work, it does help to know a few basics.

Here are seven of the most important employment laws that can affect your day-to-day work.

When an employer files an I-140 form on an immigrant employee's behalf, the last thing that employee may be concerned about is having the I-140 petition revoked by that employer. However, it is important to know that the employer does have the ability to revoke the petition. Generally, an employer will only seek to revoke the petition in a few limited circumstances, including but not limited to:

Workplaces are becoming more accommodating, especially when it comes to fashion. Every day seems like casual Friday in Silicon Valley. And many companies pride themselves on not only allowing but encouraging their employees to express themselves freely in their fashion choices.

But what about more conservative employers? And what about company grooming policies, like bans on dreadlocks, which appear to have a racial motivation? Can banning dreadlocks constitute racial discrimination?

Whether it's the job of your dreams or just something to pay the bills, getting a job offer is a great feeling. You've done all the hard work of finding the position, applying, and interviewing, so saying yes should be the easy part, right?

Well, not always. There are still quite a few things to consider before you shake your new boss's hand or sign an employment contract. Here are three of those things you need to think about before you accept a job offer.

Can I Legally Be Fired for Taking Sick Days?

You are a worker in the USA, so you can get fired for anything, including calling in sick, or nothing, no reason at all. Your employer does not have to be fair. You just have to do your job and be grateful for it, or so says Glass Door, an employment guidance site.

Legally speaking, most employment contracts are at-will, meaning you can go and you can be let go for any reason or no reason. But employment is a relationship and you provide a service, so let us not live in fear. Try to be reasonable, and do your job, and you should not get fired for needing time unless your boss is a tyrant.

Most of us don't think about where our food comes from. We see something tasty in the veggie aisle at the supermarket and toss it in our basket. Even those of us who are members of farm shares or community supported agriculture (CSA) programs don't always consider the labor it takes to get food from the ground to our doorstep.

And sadly, many of the workers who take care of our food have not enjoyed the same legal labor rights as other workers. But that might be changing as some states seek to enhance and enforce farmworker rights.

As Americans, we spend more time working than any other activity. And for many of us, even time spent away from work is time spent worrying about work -- concern for coworkers, thinking about upcoming projects, or wondering if what your boss is doing is legal.

Here are nine of the most common legal questions employees ponder, and where to find answers:

Can I Record a Conversation at Work?

You can always record a conversation if you let everyone know it is happening and all parties consent. Even if people don't affirmatively agree, when they keep talking to you after you gave them notice, you've received a kind of consent.

But if you want to secretly record someone that is a whole other ball of wax and whether you can do it legally depends on several factors. Let's consider them.

A total of 39 states allow patients to use medical marijuana in some form or another, but the laws from state to state can vary significantly. Four states and the District of Columbia have fully legalized cannabis, while ten states only permit non-psychoactive cannabidiol. And that says nothing about the federal government's current prohibition on marijuana entirely, coupled with its hands-off approach to state decriminalization efforts.

All of this leaves medical marijuana users in a legally precarious position vis-a-vis their employers. Does a doctor's prescription or state law protect you from being fired if you use marijuana legally?

For some jobs, we don't have a say in how much we get paid -- we're offered a salary and either take it or leave it. In other cases, employers may give prospective employees a salary range dependent on experience. And in a few instances, it may seem like the salary is set, when employers are actually willing to have a bit more flexibility in pay.

So how do you know when you can negotiate your salary? And what's the best way of handling those negotiations? Here are a few tips.