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Though the fourth smallest state by size, New Jersey is the most densely populated state, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. This is due in no small part to the state's proximity to New York City, Philadelphia, and several other major U.S. metropolitan areas.

But whether you count yourself as a lifelong New Jerseyan, are just visiting, or are passing through from one of New Jersey's neighboring states, you should familiarize yourself with the nuances of New Jersey state law.

Here are 10 laws that you should know if you're in New Jersey:

You may have a handle on the big things in your estate plan like real estate, bank accounts, and guardians for your children. But there are a few things you may not have considered.

For example: Do you know who will take care of your pets when you've passed on? And what about custody of assets almost as precious as your pets, like your guns and prized collections? Who will take care of them?

We won't let you forget these five things you need to include in your estate plan:

Georgia is home to Turner Field, Coca-Cola, and boiled peanuts. But the Empire State of the South also boasts a unique set of laws that governs everyday life in the state.

So whether you're settling down in Marietta or posting up in a penthouse suite next to your famous neighbor T.I., you need to at least get a handle on these 10 Georgia laws:

Everyone from Ohio knows that "toward the lake" means north, and "toward the river" means south. In Ohio, when someone asks you how far away something is, you respond in minutes, not miles ("it's about 15 minutes from here"), and the University of Michigan is your mortal enemy.

When visiting the Buckeye State, if there's one thing you have to know, it's that candy buckeyes are delicious and real buckeyes are poisonous. Oh, and don't forget to keep these 10 laws in mind too:

Want to amend your trust? As a recent case out of Missouri shows, you may need a few legal tips about how to do it right.

The case involved Dr. K.R. Conklin, who hand-wrote some modifications to his trust in 1996. He and his wife were embarking on a cross-country trip, and just in case something happened to them, they wanted to change the distribution of stuff in their trust.

Thankfully, Dr. Conklin survived the trip. However, when he eventually died in 2009, a fight ensued between his children -- who were beneficiaries in his original trust -- and his stepchildren, who were named in the hand-written amendment, but not the original trust. The Missouri Supreme Court determined that Dr. Conklin's hand-written letter wasn't an effective amendment to his trust.

So how can you amend a trust so that it's fool-proof? Here are a few legal tips to keep in mind:

A power of attorney (POA) is one of the most powerful (and potentially risky) documents one can sign: It gives a third party "agent" the ability to control the assets of the "principal" as if the agent were the principal. Depending on how broad the POA is, that could mean anything from controlling one's financial accounts to controlling everything: healthcare decisions, investments, property, and accounts.

With that much power comes a duty to act in the principal's best interest. As you might expect, that doesn't always happen. And if an agent is abusing his or her power, and the principal can't revoke the POA (a typical example would be a principal who is mentally incompetent), you might want to challenge that POA in court.

How? Here are a few ideas:

Pennsylvania was one of the original 13 colonies, and if you're in the Keystone State, you should be familiar with its rich history of laws.

While learning about the life of the Founding Fathers is a great way to enjoy the history of Pennsylvania, you may also want to focus on the present laws that will have a slightly more pressing effect.

Get ready for an updated page of Poor Richard's Almanac, with 10 laws you should know if you're in present-day Pennsylvania:

Florida is a great place to raise a family, vacation, or even retire. But you'd be a fool to do any of the above without knowing at least some of the Sunshine State's laws.

Don't even think about passing down that "Golden Girls"-style South Beach pad without first learning if your will is valid under Florida law. And while you may have the pants and the look of "Miami Vice," you should probably know the DUI laws before you hit the road.

To make your Florida fantasy a legal reality, check out these 10 laws you should know:

Legal How-To: Burying Your Pet

No owner wants to think about burying his or her pet, but it's often necessary to find a final resting place for your furry friend.

But before you get a shovel and a large cardboard box for your pet's backyard burial, you should know about the kinds of laws you may be violating. This is especially true if you're thinking about burying your pet in a public park.

Before you say your goodbyes, check out our legal how-to on burying your pet:

Ah New York, there's really no way to fake the Empire State. And that's certainly true of its laws.

But even if you're not a native New Yorker and are just visiting or passing through, you should definitely have a basic understanding of New York's legal structures.

Don't be one of those out-of-town yokels who gets a ticket for texting while driving in Manhattan. Check out these 10 laws you should know if you're in New York: