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A new study examining the link between the amount of money spent on a wedding and the duration of marriage has come to a somewhat surprising conclusion: Couples who spend less on their wedding tend to stay married longer than those who opt for expensive weddings.

In the study, researchers at Emory University looked at over 3,100 married couples, reports the Chicago Tribune. In addition to the amount of money spent on a wedding, the study found several other correlations between wedding ceremonies and duration of marriage that seem to go against conventional wisdom.

What does your wedding say about the odds of your marriage ending in divorce?

Pennsylvania was one of the original 13 colonies, and if you're in the Keystone State, you should be familiar with its rich history of laws.

While learning about the life of the Founding Fathers is a great way to enjoy the history of Pennsylvania, you may also want to focus on the present laws that will have a slightly more pressing effect.

Get ready for an updated page of Poor Richard's Almanac, with 10 laws you should know if you're in present-day Pennsylvania:

Divorcing spouses often hope that a judge will award them attorney's fees as part of a crushing legal victory over their former partners.

As satisfying and poetic as it might be to have your ex-spouse pay for your divorce lawyer, in most cases, the bill is on you. Generally speaking, it's only in extreme or special circumstances that you'll be able to get someone else to pay your divorce attorney's fees.

So in a divorce case, when can you potentially get attorney's fees?

Illinois is more than just home to Chicago, it's practically the center of culture for the Midwest. But you won't be able to fully appreciate that spirit if you don't know the laws of the Prairie State.

Northwestern students know better than to hit the road without obeying Illinois' DUI laws, and we think even Al Capone knew how his estate might be split up.

Don't visit or set up roots in the Land of Lincoln without learning more about these 10 laws:

Although it takes two to get married, it typically only takes one to get divorced.

When a divorce petition has been filed by the spouse seeking divorce, that petition is served on the other spouse. That spouse is then expected to answer the petition within a specific time dictated by state law.

But what happens if the other spouse fails (or refuses) to respond to the divorce papers?

Florida is a great place to raise a family, vacation, or even retire. But you'd be a fool to do any of the above without knowing at least some of the Sunshine State's laws.

Don't even think about passing down that "Golden Girls"-style South Beach pad without first learning if your will is valid under Florida law. And while you may have the pants and the look of "Miami Vice," you should probably know the DUI laws before you hit the road.

To make your Florida fantasy a legal reality, check out these 10 laws you should know:

Legal How-To: Burying Your Pet

No owner wants to think about burying his or her pet, but it's often necessary to find a final resting place for your furry friend.

But before you get a shovel and a large cardboard box for your pet's backyard burial, you should know about the kinds of laws you may be violating. This is especially true if you're thinking about burying your pet in a public park.

Before you say your goodbyes, check out our legal how-to on burying your pet:

A Pennsylvania court has ruled that an attorney is bound by the terms of a child custody agreement that requires him to pay $10,000 to his ex-partner every time he files a court action to modify the agreement.

In a somewhat ironic twist, it turns out the attorney drafted the agreement himself, reports The Patriot-News. Although a lower court had ruled in the attorney's favor, finding that the agreement was void as being counter to public policy concerns, the state Superior Court -- one of two statewide appellate courts -- disagreed.

How might this lawyer's own legal work end up costing him?

Yours truly is a Texas native, but we won't blame you if you're just arriving or simply here to visit. What Texans won't appreciate is someone who's clueless about the laws in the Lone Star State.

So before your Southwest flight lands, check out these 10 laws you should know if you're in Texas:

For those sponsoring an immigrant to become a citizen, you will likely need to sign a Form I-864, otherwise known as an Affidavit of Support.

According to the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), this document is required "for most family-based immigrants and some employment-based immigrants" to show the federal government that they will have a means of support when they arrive. If you are petitioning for a relative or spouse to come to the United States, you will probably be required to sign this affidavit.

But there are three important things sponsors should know about these affidavits of support: