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Divorce is one of the hardest legal events anyone will ever face. When you divorce, you face losses that are not just emotional, but financial and legal as well. This blog series will help answer some basic questions you might have about divorce.

After the child custody and support issues are sorted out, one of the biggest questions divorcing couples need to answer is who gets what after the split. Some things, like the family car, you might love to keep; other things, like your spouse's debt, you want no part of. So how do couples -- or courts -- divide property during a divorce?

Here are five of the biggest marital property questions, and where you can go for answers.

A minor generally cannot become emancipated from just one parent unless there is only one parent, such as when one of the minor's parents has died, or has terminated their parental rights. Emancipation of a minor terminates all parental custodial rights, which in turn makes that minor an adult for legal purposes.

While we've all heard the stories of young celebrities that sought emancipation from their parents, it is important to note that there are many reasons why celebrities, as minors, would choose to petition for emancipation. Drew Barrymore, at 15, sought emancipation to become an adult in order to avoid child labor laws so that she could better pursue her acting career. On the other hand, Macaulay Culkin and Corey Feldman both sought emancipation after learning of their parents' financial mismanagement of their earnings.

Once you've made the decision to get out of your marriage, your next question might be how long it will take to get it all over with. We're sure you don't need to be told that doing it right is better than doing it fast, but we also know that prolonging an already emotionally-charged situation doesn't do anyone any favors. So how quickly can you get a divorce?

Every ending marriage is unique, but there are some common factors that can expedite or delay your divorce.

Divorce is one of the hardest legal events anyone will ever face. When you divorce, you face losses that are not just emotional, but financial and legal as well. This blog series will help answer some basic questions you might have about divorce.

You know one thing -- your marriage is coming to an end. After that, there's a seemingly endless list of questions and precious few answers. And most of those unanswered questions center on the paperwork and procedure involved with filing for divorce.

While every divorce is unique and will present its own set of questions, there are some answers that will apply to most divorce cases. Here are three of the biggest divorce procedure questions, and a few answers as well.

Divorce is one of the hardest legal events anyone will ever face. When you divorce, you face losses that are not just emotional, but financial and legal as well. This blog series will help answer some basic questions you might have about divorce.

It's not a great place to be -- knowing your marriage is probably coming to an end, but just not sure how it will happen. Do you go ahead and file for divorce? Wait for your spouse to? Does it even matter?

Legally speaking, there is little reason to outrace your soon-to-be-ex to the courthouse. But, as with many things in life, there may be reasons to take charge of the divorce process by filing first.

Just because your ex missed a child support payment doesn't mean the obligation goes away. Like any financial obligation, the amount you're owed will accumulate and your ex will still be responsible for making back child support payments. But for how long? Child support generally runs until a child turns 18, but if your ex missed payments during that time, can you still collect back child support after that?

Here's what you need to know.

Divorce is one of the hardest legal events anyone will ever face. When you divorce, you face losses that are not just emotional, but financial and legal as well. This blog series will help answer some basic questions you might have about divorce.

Every marriage is unique, and every divorce can present its own set of emotional and legal challenges. But every now and then couples are faced with some especially demanding or downright odd circumstances, many of which aren't easy to deal with. For instance, what if your spouse lives in another country? Or behind bars?

Here are five of the strangest divorce scenarios, along with some advice on handling them, from our archives:

It ain't easy being a teen. And it sure ain't easy raising one, especially in this day and age. Between camera phones, social media, and access to automobiles, it feels like there are more ways for teenagers to get into trouble than ever before.

So how do you keep your teenager out of harm's way? And which laws might land them in trouble? Here's a look at five laws parents should know about, from our archives.

Can I Serve Divorce Papers Myself?

Divorce is one of the hardest legal events anyone will ever face. When you divorce, you face losses that are not just emotional, but financial and legal as well. This blog series will help answer some basic questions you might have about divorce.

When you file divorce papers, the court clerk stamps all the copies, keeps a few, and gives one back to you with a stamped summons, and maybe a stack of other informational documents. Then what? Then, you actually need to have the papers served on your soon-to-be ex. This process is called service of process. But can you serve the papers yourself?

Generally, when you serve initial court papers, you are not the person actually delivering the papers. Almost every state has professional process servers who, for a fee, will deliver your documents and sign a proof of service form. While some states offer alternative methods of service apart from personal delivery, personal delivery is the best method to ensure receipt cannot be disputed.

For the most part, divorce courts don't treat cheating spouses like they used to. With the rise of no-fault divorce options, whether one spouse had an extramarital affair generally doesn't come into play in divorce cases.

But what about when children are involved? Could courts and judges take adultery into account when making child custody decisions?