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If you're fighting in court over a cash payment, how can you prove that you actually paid?

Paying for things in cash may be becoming less common as technology marches on, but if you still use cash, you'll want to get some proof that you paid. In many cases, the person you paid may be reluctant or defiant about admitting that he's been paid. In order to get the law's help, you may need to prove that the cash in question actually changed hands.

So how do you do this? Every case is different, but here are some potential ways to prove you paid for something with cash:

How many Americans have been victims of identity theft? According to a new FindLaw.com survey, 29 percent of U.S. adults say they've had their identity stolen. What's more, about 10 percent say they've been hit by identity theft twice.

Identity theft can include everything from having personal data stolen by a computer virus to the theft of credit cards and IDs from a purse or wallet, and can result in serious damage to a person's finances, credit, and quality of life.

What did the survey discover about identity theft victims, and what can you do to protect your own identity?

Alongside the many well-known benefits of using a credit card to make purchases -- being able to pay over time, earning airline miles, or other rewards -- credit cards also offer unique protections for consumers who may feel like they didn't get what they bargained for in a purchase.

Credit card companies are generally obligated by state and federal law to offer customers chargebacks for disputed charges. Chargebacks function as a refund for purchases made by consumers who have a valid dispute as to the charges associated with the purchase.

How do chargebacks work?

For most Americans, tax season ended almost six months ago on April 15. But those who instead filed a tax extension have hopefully spent the last six months preparing for their extended deadline, which is coming up on October 15.

Tax extensions allow taxpayers who are unable to complete their taxes by the filing deadline to instead file for an extension with the IRS, giving them an extra six months to complete their tax returns for the previous year.

What do those who are coming up on the tax-extension deadline need to keep in mind? Here are three last-minute tips:

Yours truly is a Texas native, but we won't blame you if you're just arriving or simply here to visit. What Texans won't appreciate is someone who's clueless about the laws in the Lone Star State.

So before your Southwest flight lands, check out these 10 laws you should know if you're in Texas:

One of the most popular ways of passing on retirement savings, inherited IRAs, have little protection from bankruptcy after a U.S. Supreme Court ruling issued Thursday.

While other retirement devices are typically protected from creditors during a bankruptcy, the High Court determined that inherited IRAs were not for "essential needs" in the same way as other retirement structures, Reuters reports.

What does this mean for the future or present use of inherited IRAs?

Sorry Al Bundy, but when it comes to love and marriage, you can have one without other.

For many young couples, marriage is no longer a prerequisite to living together or starting a family. However, there are some legal issues that are unique to those who choose to forego marriage and just skip to the happily ever after.

Here are five things to be aware of if you're planning on living with your partner and child(ren), but without getting married:

If a Student Loan Co-Signer Dies, What Happens?

If a student loan co-signer dies or declares bankruptcy before the loan is repaid, the loan may go into default and wreak havoc on the borrower's credit, a new report finds.

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau published the report which found that many private lenders will make the balance of a loan due if a parent, grandparent, or other co-signer becomes unable to share the responsibility of the loan, Reuters reports.

Why does this happen, and what can borrowers do?

How Many Trustees Can a Trust Have?

When creating a trust, how many trustees can you have?

Trusts are estate planning tools that can be used to manage how a person's property is distributed after death, without going through probate. Trustees play an important role in protecting the beneficiary's (or beneficiaries') interests.

So how many trustees should you have? To understand the answer to that question, you'll want to have a better understanding of a trustee's role.

Legal How-To: Getting Student Loans Forgiven

As you try to manage your student loans, it's important to remember that there are a number of loan forgiveness programs out there that you may qualify for.

Forgiveness programs aren't a quick fix, as they take several years to complete. Still, they're a great way to see the light at the end of the tunnel, to avoid defaulting on your loans, and eventually, to help you move on with your life.

Here are a few potential ways to get your student loans forgiven: