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Recently in Immigration Law Category

The mixed messages continue coming from the White House on the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, this time with DACA recipients getting some good news. Although the Trump administration already announced plans to end DACA protections next year, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services is giving a second chance to immigrants whose renewal applications were rejected for missing the deadline.

If yours was one of those, you may resubmit the renewal request.

'I am canceling the last administration's completely one-sided deal with Cuba,' President Donald Trump declared in June, announcing yet another rollback or rescission of Obama-era policies. And those new rules went into effect this week, banning Americans from doing business with 180 listed entities with ties to the Cuban military, intelligence, and security services, including over 80 hotels, stores, marinas, tourist agencies, and industries owned by the government or its subsidiaries.

So you may want to hold off packing your bags for a Havana getaway -- while U.S. citizens are prohibited from traveling to or doing business in Cuba entirely, there are some additional restrictions you should know about.

When word got out that former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort had three U.S. passports to his name when he was indicted on federal money laundering, false statement, and conspiracy against the United States charges, the first question that popped up for most people was: Just how many U.S. passports can one person have?

The short answer is one. The long answer involves some exceptions that allow a person to hold multiple U.S. passports, and it's not clear which, if any, applied in Manafort's case.

As the Trump administration ramps up its immigration reforms and enforcement, sanctuary cities and states have found themselves squarely in the federal government's legal crosshairs. The lawsuits have been flying, and people are wondering whether immigration enforcement agents will respect churches as sanctuaries for undocumented immigrants.

Although U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement designates churches as "sensitive" places to be avoided when making arrests, living in a church -- or a sanctuary city or state -- is no guarantee against deportation. Here's what you need to know.

The latest iteration of President Trump's Executive Order banning foreign immigrants and visitors from Muslim majority nations has been blocked by a federal judge in Hawaii.

No, you're not suffering from deja vu. Judge Derrick Watson, the same judge that blocked the second travel ban, temporarily blocked travel ban 3.0 from going into effect. This newest iteration of the executive order travel restrictions was set to go into effect on October 18, 2017.

A new rule will allow the Department of Homeland Security to gather social media information for immigrants, including "social media handles, aliases, associated identifiable information, and search results." While this might seem like a normal update to the vetting process for incoming visitors or visa applications, the rule would reportedly also apply to people who have already obtained a green card or completed the naturalization process.

Additionally, the new rule could make U.S. citizens' conversations with immigrants on social media subject to government surveillance. Here's a look.

Most of us don't think about what happens to people deported from the United States, or where they go. But that process can be pretty complicated and require the cooperation of other nations accepting deportees. And the Trump administration is accusing four nations of being less than cooperative in deportation efforts, and using that lack of cooperation to withhold visas from citizens of those countries looking to enter the U.S.

Reuters is reporting that the State Department will stop issuing certain kinds of visas to citizens of Cambodia, Eritrea, Guinea, and Sierra Leone in retaliation for those nations not taking back their citizens deported from the United States. It's just the latest flashpoint in President Trump's immigration crackdown.

Normally if you're concerned with ice at a hotel, it's locating the nearest machine to your room. There was a different concern for guests at two Motel 6 locations in Phoenix, Arizona -- that employees were calling ICE to report guests who may be in the country illegally.

A recent news investigation found at least 20 Immigration and Customs Enforcement arrests made at those locations, and some of those arrested claim no one else knew they were there. So how did immigration enforcement know?

It's not untrue to say that Donald Trump has had a 'busy' presidency -- the Twitterer-in-Chief has been as active on social media as he has been with executive orders. But many of those orders have been met with litigation and currently stand somewhere in legal limbo between lawsuits filed and Supreme Court review.

One of Trump's most active areas of executive authority has been immigration. Here's the latest on Trump's immigration reform efforts, where they stand (legally speaking), and what they could mean.

One of the tropes often trotted out in immigration debates is the notion that undocumented immigrants are getting services meant for citizens without paying into the system that funds those services. While this has been proven untrue (Pew Research estimates 8 million undocumented workers and their employers paid $13 billion in payroll taxes in 2010), the myth of undocumented immigrants getting a free ride in the U.S. persists.

And few forums are as ripe for this sentiment as public education. So can undocumented immigrant children attend public schools?