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There's been a lot of heated rhetoric around immigration this election season, and so much vitriolic back-and-forth can leave people wondering where they actually stand when it comes to their rights and the law. And it doesn't help that U.S. immigration law is already an overly complicated area of law.

So here are five of the biggest immigration law questions, and where you can turn for answers, from our archives:

If you or a loved one has been trying to get a green card, there's a program that started way back in 1990 that you may have never heard of: The Green Card Lottery, also know as a Diversity Visa. This program awards green cards to 50,000 immigrants from countries that have low immigration rates to the United States. The Department of State has begun taking entries for the 2018 lottery drawings, and will continue accepting entries until 12:00 p.m. November 7, 2016.

The Diversity Visa program is intended to diversify the immigrant population within the United States by only awarding the visas to individuals from countries with low rates of immigration. While a prospective immigrant's country of origin is among the most important factor considered, there is an additional requirement that applicants must have a high school education or the equivalent, or two years of specialized job training within the last five years.

When an employer files an I-140 form on an immigrant employee's behalf, the last thing that employee may be concerned about is having the I-140 petition revoked by that employer. However, it is important to know that the employer does have the ability to revoke the petition. Generally, an employer will only seek to revoke the petition in a few limited circumstances, including but not limited to:

When a US Citizen or permanent resident seeks to help an immediate family member to immigrate to the US, there is quite a bit of paperwork required. The first form that needs to be completed is the USCIS Form I-130. This form must be completed for each individual family member that wants to immigrate.

US Immigration law is confusing and filled with multiple forms that must be correctly filled out. The USCIS Form I-130 should be used for the following relatives of US citizens and permanent residents:

While it comes as no surprise to recent immigrants, the United States has rather strict immigration laws. For undocumented immigrants, also called "illegal immigrants" or "illegal aliens," the legal system can be scary.

Below are five important facts about US immigration laws relating to undocumented immigrants.

Just as U.S. citizenship can be granted, it can also be revoked. The process, called denaturalization, only applies to naturalized citizens, as natural-born U.S. citizens cannot have their citizenship revoked against their will. Denaturalization can be a frightening experience, as former citizens who have been denaturalized can be subject to deportation.

So why can a person be denaturalized? And how does the denaturalization process work?

Canadians are friendly, and that's not just a stereotype. But that also doesn't mean that their borders are any less secure than our own. There are strict requirements for identification to cross the Canadian border as well as stringent controls on what you can bring into and out of the country.

So whether you're headed for work or a weekend getaway, by boat, car, train, or plane, here's what you need to know about crossing the Canadian border:

The Permanent Resident Card or green card process can seem overwhelming -- the qualification, the documentation, and, of course, the forms you'll need to fill out. One of those forms is the G-325A, Biographic Information form, which seeks background information on the applicant like family names and former residences and places of employment.

While much of the G-325A is self-explanatory, there can be sections and questions that are daunting or just confusing. Here's what you need to know about filling out a form G-325A.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection has the unenviable task of patrolling over 7,500 miles of territory between the United States, Canada, and Mexico. It is responsible for everything from monitoring import and export of goods, to preventing drug smuggling. The agency also has an enormous role in enforcing immigration laws.

The Department of Homeland Security estimates more than 500 million people cross American borders every year, each one coming in contact with border patrol in some fashion. So here are five things you need to know about U.S. Border Patrol.

Parents aren't the only ones headed on vacation or to visit family in other countries. And they're not the only ones who need a passport to do so. So you may need to get a passport for your minor child in order to travel internationally.

But can you get a passport for an infant? What documents do you need for a passport? And do both parents need to consent? Here's what you need to know about getting a passport for your child.