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After three failed attempts by Congress to repeal Obamacare, President Donald Trump took matters into his own hands last week, signing an executive order reshaping how people get insurance through work and threatening to end federal subsidies to insurance companies under the Affordable Care Act.

"I just keep hearing repeal-replace, repeal-replace," Trump said while signing the order. "Well, we're starting that process." So what does the executive order do, and what could ending subsidies mean for your health coverage?

As fires in Sonoma County, California rage on, the first concern is safety: getting residents out of harm's way and getting injured residents necessary medical treatment. And when the flames are out, people will turn to rebuilding and compensation for property lost to the fires.

Most residential and commercial property owners will turn first to their insurance policies, fingers crossed that they cover fire damage and natural disasters. If you're filing an insurance claim after a fire -- or wondering if your policy covers fire damage -- here's what you need to know:

Between Obamacare and workers' compensation, auto and home policies, and even whether you want coverage on that box you're mailing, our lives are constantly surrounded by insurance policies. If something is valuable and its damage or loss would cause you harm, it can be insured. But despite the myriad policies and plans, most people are in the dark when it comes to the basics of insurance coverage and the law that applies to insurance claims.

Lucky for you, FindLaw is here to help. Our Learn About the Law section just unveiled dozens of insurance-specific articles to give you all the information you need about what can be covered by an insurance policy, what those policies can contain, buying and selling insurance policies, and how to make a claim if something goes wrong. Here's a look.

On the Road: 3 Cheapest and Most Expensive States to Drive

The open road is a part of the national imagination. We love cars in the US, fetishizing them in our books, films, and music. People here start driving early, and the lucky ones go on lots of road trips, listening to songs about cars the whole way, of course.

But the cost of ownership varies widely from state to state, according to a new study by finance site GoBankRate. The study examined costs associated with car ownership beyond the purchase of a vehicle, that is, putting aside sticker price, and compared these nationwide. Let's see which states are most and least expensive.

Can I Be Sued for a Fender Bender?

Your phone was buzzing and you just had to check the text. Next thing you know, you miss a light change and plow into the car in front of you. Nobody seems seriously hurt at first, so you trade information with the other driver, apologize, and soon return to the preoccupations that led to the accident.

A fender bender refers to a minor collision, so generally speaking these are resolved through auto insurance claims. Technically speaking, these are tiny accidents. But molehills can become mountains with time and you may find yourself sued for negligence due to an injury caused by your fender bender.

5 Reasons Travel Insurance Policies Are Invalidated

You are planning a holiday trip and looking forward to it. Everything is ready from your bags to your mini toiletries and travel insurance. So now you can just relax, right?

Well, not quite. You can relax, but maybe not with a drink, and certainly not with any illegal drugs, and probably not if your plans include any extreme sports. Here is a list, adapted from the Consumer Insurance Guide, with the top five reasons that insurers give for invalidating travel insurance.

Car insurance. You know you need it, but how much? What happens if you don’t have it? What happens when you get in an accident?

To help clear the air, here is a roundup of our best car insurance articles to help answer your questions.

Obamacare lives to fight another day!

The health care law, more formally known as the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), withstood yet another attempt to negate it today after the Supreme Court ruled in favor of the government in King v. Burwell.

You get a ticket; your insurance goes up. You get in an accident; your insurance goes up even more. You get a DUI conviction, and you'll be eating dollar menu McDonald's everyday to afford your insurance premiums.

Insurance rate increases can vary wildly between states. Since most states don't have limits on how much insurance rates can go up, you could be paying thousands of dollars more for an accident or ticket or a DUI.

Here are the 10 worst states to be a bad driver:

It's almost a fact of life. You get in an accident, and your car insurance company raises your rates.

Some companies lure customers by promising not to raise rates after a first car crash. Some companies don't raise rates after an accident that was not your fault. But, many companies raise your rates dramatically after an accident or insurance claim.

It seems unfair. Are there legal limits on how much a car insurance company can raise your rates?