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Social media platform Twitter is updating the tools it provides users to report and block cyberabuse.

The new features will roll out to all Twitter users over the next several weeks, reports Ars Technica. They come amid increasing reports of abusive and threatening behavior online. A recent survey by research firm YouGov found that more than 1 in 4 Americans admitted to engaging in malicious online activity known as "trolling."

How do the new safety measures work, and what prompted Twitter to take action?

One of the problems with the all-too-common Internet troll is that he or she is mostly anonymous, making it hard to pin down a person in court.

And even if you are able to zero in on your particular troll, there may be little the law can do to compensate you. Sometimes "trolling" is just a very deplorable and infuriating (but legal) part of our Internet lives.

So can you actually sue anonymous Internet trolls? Here are a few things to consider:

More than 1 in 4 Americans -- 28 percent, to be exact -- admit to Internet "trolling," according to an online survey conducted by research firm YouGov. Trolling is defined as "malicious online activity" directed at a stranger. Trolls like to argue, harass, or sow discord just because they like the reaction it provokes.

Trolls aren't well regarded in the online community, and in fact, contribute to an overall decline in the quality of online discussion and debate. It got so bad on the website for the magazine Popular Science that the editors decided to turn off the ability to comment on articles last year. In so doing, Popular Science referred to a study showing that "uncivil comments not only polarized readers, but they often changed a participant's interpretation of the news story itself" -- meaning that trolls debating an article in bad faith actually caused readers to disbelieve something that was true.

OK, so trolling is bad for debate. But can it carry legal consequences?

Like email and other digital communications, online chats can sometimes act to preserve conversations months, or even years after they took place.

In a civil lawsuit or criminal trial, the contents of a conversation conducted via online chat could help prove or disprove an important fact or substantiate the version of events told by either side.

But can online chats actually be used as evidence in court?

Facebook users may be convinced that they "own" whatever content they post to Facebook, but the legal reality is a little bit different.

If you read Facebook's legal terms of service, you'll find that "[y]ou own all of the content and information you post on Facebook," but with some very specific and important caveats.

So what does it mean to legally "own" your Facebook posts?

There are a few entities that require you to disclose your true legal name, but you may be surprised to know that Facebook is one of them.

In a strange twist, Facebook has been deleting the profiles of drag queens in an attempt to enforce its "name change" policy. According to The Huffington Post, individuals operating on Facebook under pseudonyms and stage names (or anything other than a legal name) were treated to Facebook temporarily suspending their accounts.

Can Facebook require you to use a real legal name for your account?

Setting up a blog can be a great exercise, either as a way to keep track of your latest baking kick or even to bootstrap your fledgling small business.

But you should be aware of some of the most obvious legal problems that occur when bloggers step into the chaotic realm of the blogosphere. The last thing you'd want is for your puppy blog to get you sued or to put your safety at risk.

To keep our fellow bloggers safe and legally sound, we present these five legal red flags for blogs:

With the seeming ubiquity of Facebook sharing and the proliferation of high-quality mobile phone cameras, it's easier than ever for parents to flood the Internet with pictures of their babies.

But an increasing number of parents are opting for a Facebook blackout when it comes to photos of their kids, reports The Associated Press. Why are more and more parents choosing not to chronicle their young children's lives on Facebook?

Here are five reasons (including a few legal ones) that you may want to keep baby pics off Facebook:

You may think an email message is the "smoking gun" in your case, and you'd like to use it as evidence. But legally, it isn't always as easy as bringing a printed-out copy of an important email to court.

The rules of evidence may require that the email be authenticated and to be introduced in a way that doesn't violate the general prohibition on hearsay evidence.

With these concerns in mind, here are a few tips on how to use email as evidence:

The Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts has issued a warning regarding a new email scam that requests personal information under the guise of a federal jury summons.

In a public alert issued this week, the Administrative Office noted that this latest juror scam has so far been reported in at least 14 federal court districts around the country.

How does this new scam work, and how can you tell the difference between a scam and an actual federal jury summons?