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Don't dump trash in the Grand Canyon. That's the message that you might learn from a rafter who was just ordered to pay close to $2,500 for dumping trash in the Colorado River.

In a press release by the U.S. Attorney's Office for the District of Arizona, federal prosecutors announced that Nels Nicholas Niemi, 75, was ordered to pay fines and court costs after being found guilty of "dumping refuse into the Colorado River." Niemi was leading a group down a 12-day rafting trip through Grand Canyon National Park when the violation occurred.

Why is this Grand Canyon dumping case so special?

When your neighbor gets on your last nerve, you may be able to turn to your homeowners' association (HOA) for help.

HOAs are set up to enforce certain standards for their members under the covenants, conditions, and restrictions (CC&Rs) that legally bind each member. And that includes your aggravating neighbor.

So here's a general overview of how to legally enforce your HOA's rules against your neighbor:

There are a number of kinds of service professionals you can invite on to your property to do work: landscapers, roofers, exterminators, etc. But what happens when those workers are injured on your property?

Property owners do have certain responsibilities towards those who are allowed on their land, but this does not give workers freedom to be negligent or reckless.

So when is a property owner liable for workers injured on his or her property?

A fence around your property can serve a range of purposes: marking your property line, keeping trespassers out, and/or providing privacy for your family.

However, a fence can also be the source of a potential dispute with your neighbors. With that in mind, making sure that your fence does not violate property laws or local restrictions can help prevent potential legal problems down the road.

How do you go about making sure your fence is in compliance with the law? Here's what you can do:

Nothing ruins a festive holiday season like an ice-cold apartment with no working heater. While there's not a whole lot that the law requires from your landlord as far as amenities are concerned, adequate heating during cold weather is one of them.

Getting your landlord to fix the heat might be as simple as asking him or her, but just in case, here's a quick legal guide:

For many homeowners, November means it's time to start putting up holiday decorations both inside and outside their homes.

But owners of houses or condos that are members of a homeowners association might want to think twice before decking the outside of their hall with boughs of holly. HOA rules may limit, or in some circumstances prohibit certain kinds of holiday decorations.

Is it legal for an HOA to limit a member's ability to decorate his or her home for the holidays?

The U.S. Supreme Court has been as busy as nine incredibly well educated beavers this year, and November should prove to be an interesting month for the High Court.

There are issues of gun control, homeland security, and even home loans to contend with. So here are 10 Supreme Court cases you should really pay attention to in November:

Pennsylvania was one of the original 13 colonies, and if you're in the Keystone State, you should be familiar with its rich history of laws.

While learning about the life of the Founding Fathers is a great way to enjoy the history of Pennsylvania, you may also want to focus on the present laws that will have a slightly more pressing effect.

Get ready for an updated page of Poor Richard's Almanac, with 10 laws you should know if you're in present-day Pennsylvania:

Breaking up is hard to do, and you may be clueless about how to break it to your landlord that you're moving out.

Unlike breaking up with your latest fling, there's actually a great semi-formal method of calling it quits with your tenancy: a move-out letter. By sending your landlord a letter, you can clearly announce your intention to move and highlight your rights and responsibilities before you do.

Don't know where to start? Here's a quick how-to on giving your landlord written notice of your move-out:

Yours truly is a Texas native, but we won't blame you if you're just arriving or simply here to visit. What Texans won't appreciate is someone who's clueless about the laws in the Lone Star State.

So before your Southwest flight lands, check out these 10 laws you should know if you're in Texas: