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Contrary to a popular myth among renters, a landlord can attempt to evict a tenant during any time of the year, even the dead of winter. Despite the seemingly cruel notion of kicking a person out of their home when the weather outside is frightful, for a landlord, business pressures often require goodwill towards mankind to take a backseat. Sadly, winter time evictions can have fatal results for the elderly and impoverished.

For landlords, business usually dictates evictions. If a tenant is causing a nuisance, or committing waste, it is bad for business. If a tenant is not paying rent, that's definitely bad for business. The only remedy a landlord has, apart from bringing a different type of legal action solely for the recovery of back rent or property damage, is seeking to evict and re-rent the property to a new tenant that will be better for their business.

Can I Legally Live in a Garage?

A garage is a wonderful addition to any home. Even for people who don't drive or have cars, a garage can provide useful space for storage, creative pursuits, or even a home gym. In dense, urban environments, garages are often converted into separate apartment units, commonly referred to as "in-law" units. However, the many uses for garages can be limited by state and local laws, as well as home owners' association bylaws.

Recently, a family in a Michigan neighborhood sparked some local controversy after turning their garage into an indoor/outdoor living room. In some cities, it may be illegal or a violation of building codes to use or to rent out a garage space as a living space if it does not meet code. In these situations, a renter can be evicted if they are living in an illegal in-law unit, even in places with very strong protections for renters, like San Francisco.

A New York City developer and landlord is being sued for allegedly tricking an elderly woman into signing an agreement to vacate her rent controlled apartment in the coveted Upper West Side neighborhood. The former resident's lawsuit claims that when she signed the agreement to vacate, she believed that all she was signing was a receipt to prove that she received documents about renovations that were planned for the building. Unfortunately, the documents stated that she would move out while renovations were being done.

Surprisingly, after she signed the documents, the landlord cut off heat to her unit, which ended up causing her medical problems. Additionally, while the documents she did sign stated the renovations would only last nine months, it has now been over a year, and it does not look likely that she will be able to move back home before the holidays. From the current reports, it is unclear whether the resident has been permanently or just temporarily ousted from her home.

When a child turns 18, a parent's legal obligation to financially support their child ends. While a parent's love may be unconditional, parents of minor children are obligated to house, feed, and pay for their children's needs. But when a child turns 18, parents can, in fact, legally evict their child. However, for parents who plan on evicting their adult child, there are some legal pitfalls to be aware of. Evictions are tricky, so it is highly recommended you seek out help from an experienced landlord-tenant attorney.

First off, whether your adult child is considered a tenant, lodger, guest, trespasser, or squatter will depend on your state law, as each state has different rules regarding the landlord-tenant relationship. Their status will determine what your legal rights are when it comes to eviction. Also, kicking your adult child out without warning may open you up to legal liability.

During the wintertime, landlord's are frequently called upon to fix problems that are either the result of, or made worse by, cold weather conditions. Additionally, during the winter months, a landlord faces increased liability for injuries in places that experience snow and ice. Landlords can also be liable for injuries that result from poor maintenance of the property.

Apart from ensuring that sidewalks, common areas, and entryways are free from snow and ice, landlords also have to ensure that their tenants have adequate heat and protection from the elements. The following three tips can help landlords save time, money, and headache during the winter.

Amid the current controversy over the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) that has been making headlines for the last month, last week the United States Department of the Interior announced the cancellation of 15 oil and gas leases on the land of the Blackfeet Nation, a Native American tribe. Fortunately, the lands that were leased had not been tapped for oil, nor developed, which makes the cancellation a much simpler, and much more cost effective process.

The company that held the leases, Devon Energy, cooperated with the feds and agreed to accept a refund of approximately $200,000 to account for the fees and payments made to lease the land. While these lease cancellations will not stop the DAPL, the Blackfeet Nation, and many others, are happy that the land will continue to be preserved.

When a person defaults on a loan, they may lose their home and have their credit rating ruined. But the effects of the default may not be limited to just that person -- enough loan defaults can be felt across an entire city.

That's what the city of Miami is claiming in a lawsuit filed against Wells Fargo and Bank of America, trying to hold the lenders liable when irresponsible loans cause broader economic damage. The suit was initially dismissed by a trial court, but now the Supreme Court will review whether Miami can sue for discrimination, on the basis that predatory lending has harmed the city as a whole.

How to Legally Co-Own a House

When married couples buy a house, typically both names are put on the title, or deed, and both are considered the legal co-owners of the home. However, that is not the only way to legally co-own a home. In fact, many people that only own half a duplex actually co-own a home and don't even realize it.

Also, it is not too uncommon for friends and non-married couples to buy homes together, and this can be where things get more complicated. Questions arise such as:

Sometimes, a landlord and tenant will get along great. And even if they're not best friends, some landlords and tenants can go years or even decades without any conflict whatsoever. Unfortunately, that's not true for every landlord-tenant relationship. And the worst disputes can often end up in housing court.

More often than not, a landlord will come to court with a lawyer. But the same isn't always true for renters and that can have a big impact on the outcome of the legal dispute. A study from the New York City Bar showed that tenants without legal representation were 77 percent more likely to be evicted than those with a lawyer. Perhaps that's why NYC is considering providing lawyers to low-income residents facing eviction. Here's a look at the proposed law and how it might affect tenant rights.

Short answer: Yes. Especially if you live in Washington, DC.

Renters across the country, even in states that provide for legal recreational or medicinal use of marijuana, can be evicted because of the drug. However, in places were marijuana is legal for recreational usage and medical usage, it requires more than a simple "no illegal activity" clause in your lease. Even where pot is legal, if you are selling it, growing it, processing it, and smoking it indoors or in the common areas, you can potentially get evicted.

However, in Washington, DC, just a little bit of marijuana can lead to a nuisance abatement letter to your landlord, which can lead to an eviction. When your landlord receives a nuisance abatement letter, they are under threat of property seizure and you can bet your last month's rent on the fact that your landlord will want you out fast.