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Tax Day came and went and you did nothing. Well, you probably did something -- you just didn't file your taxes. You didn't even file for an extension like we told you.

And now you might be wondering whether the IRS will come calling for their money. Can they arrest you for not filing your taxes? Send you to debtor's prison? The good news is you're probably not going to jail, yet. The bad news is your battle with the IRS could get very, very expensive.

If you inherited property as an heir or next of kin this year, you might have thought you were getting a windfall. Instead, you may have just gotten a more complicated tax filing.

Before you can determine how much you'll owe in taxes on your inheritance, you have to first figure out if you even have to pay inheritance taxes in the first place.

April 15th is nearly upon us. And for those of you not quite ready to file, you might be freaking out. Not to worry, FindLaw and the IRS are here to help.

You might have heard rumors about filing an extension and giving yourself some more time to get your paperwork in order. So let's take a look at the extension process and what it can and can't do.

Whether you've already filed your taxes, or you're planning to right before the deadline, nobody wants to be audited by the IRS. Even if you let an accountant or some fancy new software file your taxes, you may still be worried about whether your filing was correct.

Well, the recent statistics on IRS audits have been released, and they might have something to say about how likely you are to get audited this year. Let's take a look:

If you're like me and you still haven't filed your taxes yet, you might still be looking for some good advice. Lucky for us, FindLaw has us covered.

Here are the 10 (or so) best tax advice posts from FindLaw blogs:

If you're a student or recent graduate, are there any tax credits or deductions you should know about?

Even for the college-educated set, the maze of IRS tax rules, credits, and deductions can seem way too complicated. Nobody should have to figure it out by themselves.

With taxes due in a little over a month for most taxpayers (unless you get an extension), here are two tax credits and one deduction that may pay off for students and/or recent graduates:

Taxes aren't fun to think about in the best of times. And if you're going through a divorce, how such a split may affect your taxes might be the furthest from your mind.

But if you're not paying attention, you could take a bigger tax hit than necessary. So here are some potential ways to protect yourself come tax season:

What can a tax lawyer do for you, that you may not be able to do on your own?

With so many online tax filing options, taxpayers may start thinking they're experts when it comes to filing properly and getting the biggest possible refund. What many of us fail to realize, however, is just how complex the tax code can be. In some cases, it may take an expert to make sure you get a big refund check in the mail and not an audit notice from the IRS. (Or to make sure it's just an audit notice and not a criminal summons.)

So here are five things that a tax lawyer can potentially help you with:

Washington is the only state to be named after a U.S. president, and its legal legacy hardly stops there. The Evergreen State is chock full of unique laws and rules, and whether you're passing through or planning to put down roots, you should be aware of them.

Whether you're acting out your "Frasier" fantasy in Seattle or scaling Mount Rainier, you should really know these 10 laws:

Virginia is for lovers. But it's also for students, parents, thrillseekers, risk-takers, and entrepreneurs. No matter which one of those hats you decide to wear in the Commonwealth of Virginia, you'll need to know the laws of the realm.

While in the Old Dominion, be sure to know these 10 laws: