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Trending Traffic Ticket Questions From FindLaw Answers

You've got questions ... we've got answers. If you have not yet asked or answered a question in FindLaw's Answers community, what are you waiting for? This amazing free resource supports a dynamic community of legal consumers and attorneys helping each other out. Simple as that.

We see a lot of great questions in our Answers community every day. Here's a look at some recent questions relating to traffic tickets from our FindLaw Answers boards:

Read the third line from the bottom ... C, F, D, T.

Did you pass the vision test when you got your driver's license? Do you have 20/20 vision? If you need prescription glasses or contact lenses, you probably have a restricted driver's license. But unless you wear your glasses everywhere you go, you may forget to wear your glasses every once in a while.

Can you get a ticket if you drive without your glasses?

Running a stop sign can be three points on your license. A DUI can be four points. And speeding can be anywhere from two to six points, depending on how fast you were going.

Every state has a system for assigning point values to different kinds of traffic offenses, and they can often function in very different ways. So where do these points come from, and how can points affect your license?

T.S. Eliot wrote, "April is the cruellest month." The National Safety Council, on the other hand, declared April Distracted Driving Awareness Month.

The Coalition Against Distracted Driving (CADD) has decided to commemorate the occasion by filing a $1 billion (PER YEAR) lawsuit against Apple for distracting drivers with the Apple Watch, a product that no driver has been distracted by yet.

With the Supreme Court trying to decide whether Texas has to allow a Confederate flag on some of its license plates, it got us to wondering -- what exactly can we put on our license plates?

After all, we're paying for the plate, and it's going on our car. Can't we just put anything we want on our license plate? Then again, it's an official plate, issued by the state and with the state flag emblazoned on it. Can the government limit what kinds of things we can say with our license plates?

As it turns out, quite a few cases have popped up recently regarding free speech on the open road ...

We've all had that experience of finally finding a parking spot and pulling in, only to see that dreaded sign: "RESERVED." And we've all had that next thought -- what would actually happen if I parked here anyway?

It seems like a risky proposition, so let's see if those reserved parking spots are enforceable.

We've all seen them before. You're driving down the highway, probably speeding a little bit. Suddenly, in your rear view mirror, you see a black and white car.

Yikes! It's a police car. You hit your breaks, slowing down to exactly 65 mph. You keep an eye on the car and drive on your best behavior until the car passes you. Wait. It's not a cop car! It's just some dinky jalopy with a mismatched paint job.

After breathing a sigh of relief, you think, "Is that even legal? Can you paint your car to look like a cop car?"

How many Americans support laws that limit cellphone use while driving? According to a new survey, it depends on what kinds of limits you're talking about.

Half of those surveyed (50 percent) said they support laws that require hands-free cellphone use while driving, while 42 percent said they support a complete ban on drivers' cellphone use. Just 8 percent said they didn't support any limits at all.

Regardless of your feelings on the issue, laws restricting cellphone use while driving are in effect from coast to coast. Here are three facts you may not know:

Top 10 Legal How-Tos of 2014

The idea of tackling a legal issue yourself may seem intimidating, but you may be surprised at what you can accomplish with a little legal know-how.

Of course, there are some instances where consulting with a lawyer is the most prudent option. There are others, however, in which hiring a lawyer may or may not be necessary. Our series "Legal How-To" presents some of those scenarios, laying out what is required for those who may be interested in taking on a legal issue on their own.

What were this year's most popular DIY legal stories? Here are the top 10 Legal How-Tos of 2014:

Most Americans Like Red-Light Cameras: FindLaw Survey

Most Americans -- 56 percent -- are in favor of red-light cameras being used at intersections, according to a new survey by

The survey comes as New Jersey pulls the plug on its red-light cameras (they were turned off overnight, the Asbury Park Press reports); several other states and cities have taken or are considering similar steps. Supporters of the cameras say they are an effective tool for ticketing dangerous drivers. But opponents argue that they are merely money-makers that do little to improve safety.

The controversy also extends to the courtroom, where multiple questions have been raised about the admissibility and legality of red-light camera evidence.