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T.S. Eliot wrote, "April is the cruellest month." The National Safety Council, on the other hand, declared April Distracted Driving Awareness Month.

The Coalition Against Distracted Driving (CADD) has decided to commemorate the occasion by filing a $1 billion (PER YEAR) lawsuit against Apple for distracting drivers with the Apple Watch, a product that no driver has been distracted by yet.

With the Supreme Court trying to decide whether Texas has to allow a Confederate flag on some of its license plates, it got us to wondering -- what exactly can we put on our license plates?

After all, we're paying for the plate, and it's going on our car. Can't we just put anything we want on our license plate? Then again, it's an official plate, issued by the state and with the state flag emblazoned on it. Can the government limit what kinds of things we can say with our license plates?

As it turns out, quite a few cases have popped up recently regarding free speech on the open road ...

We've all had that experience of finally finding a parking spot and pulling in, only to see that dreaded sign: "RESERVED." And we've all had that next thought -- what would actually happen if I parked here anyway?

It seems like a risky proposition, so let's see if those reserved parking spots are enforceable.

We've all seen them before. You're driving down the highway, probably speeding a little bit. Suddenly, in your rear view mirror, you see a black and white car.

Yikes! It's a police car. You hit your breaks, slowing down to exactly 65 mph. You keep an eye on the car and drive on your best behavior until the car passes you. Wait. It's not a cop car! It's just some dinky jalopy with a mismatched paint job.

After breathing a sigh of relief, you think, "Is that even legal? Can you paint your car to look like a cop car?"

How many Americans support laws that limit cellphone use while driving? According to a new FindLaw.com survey, it depends on what kinds of limits you're talking about.

Half of those surveyed (50 percent) said they support laws that require hands-free cellphone use while driving, while 42 percent said they support a complete ban on drivers' cellphone use. Just 8 percent said they didn't support any limits at all.

Regardless of your feelings on the issue, laws restricting cellphone use while driving are in effect from coast to coast. Here are three facts you may not know:

Top 10 Legal How-Tos of 2014

The idea of tackling a legal issue yourself may seem intimidating, but you may be surprised at what you can accomplish with a little legal know-how.

Of course, there are some instances where consulting with a lawyer is the most prudent option. There are others, however, in which hiring a lawyer may or may not be necessary. Our series "Legal How-To" presents some of those scenarios, laying out what is required for those who may be interested in taking on a legal issue on their own.

What were this year's most popular DIY legal stories? Here are the top 10 Legal How-Tos of 2014:

Most Americans Like Red-Light Cameras: FindLaw Survey

Most Americans -- 56 percent -- are in favor of red-light cameras being used at intersections, according to a new survey by FindLaw.com.

The survey comes as New Jersey pulls the plug on its red-light cameras (they were turned off overnight, the Asbury Park Press reports); several other states and cities have taken or are considering similar steps. Supporters of the cameras say they are an effective tool for ticketing dangerous drivers. But opponents argue that they are merely money-makers that do little to improve safety.

The controversy also extends to the courtroom, where multiple questions have been raised about the admissibility and legality of red-light camera evidence.

Washington is the only state to be named after a U.S. president, and its legal legacy hardly stops there. The Evergreen State is chock full of unique laws and rules, and whether you're passing through or planning to put down roots, you should be aware of them.

Whether you're acting out your "Frasier" fantasy in Seattle or scaling Mount Rainier, you should really know these 10 laws:

Winter isn't just coming, it's already here in many places, and drivers aren't taking too much time to appreciate the change in seasons.

AAA reports that as we reach the end of 2014, national gas prices have dipped below $3 per gallon for the first time since December 2010, and drivers are taking advantage of the low prices to continue hitting the road.

We heartily support Americans exploring our country in winter, but drivers should probably put these five things in their cars first:

Are Elderly Drivers Actually Safer Drivers?

A new study seems to debunk the widely held belief that elderly drivers are less safe than younger drivers.

The study, released this week by AAA's Foundation for Traffic Safety, found that seniors are more likely to avoid unsafe behaviors behind the wheel than younger drivers, reports CBS News. As a result, accident rates for drivers 65 or older have been declining, with 31 percent fewer fatalities in 2012 than in 1997.

What else did the study have to say about older drivers?