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CA DMV Chief Sees Self-Driving Cars on Streets in 3-5 Years

Someday soon -- possibly within the next 3 to 5 years, according to predictions of the California Department of Motor Vehicles' chief counsel, Brian Soublet -- autonomous cars will be a regular feature on the streets. Once the dream of geeks and sci-fi fans, this will be everyone's reality and lawmakers are preparing for our brave new world.

Last month, the Department of Transportation announced that it is working on model legislation for autonomous cars within 6 months, and plans to spend $4 billion on auto-pilot projects. The hope is that states will adopt the federal government's as-yet-unformulated model laws and that a uniform approach to self-driving cars will exist nationwide. But right now there is concern that if the government does not get up to speed soon, carmakers will just self-certify the safety of their new rolling computers, taking a "trust me" approach to transportation of the future.

Can I Drive With Earbuds in California?

You love your podcasts and you just can't miss an episode, especially not when you are on the road. But if you are driving in California, make sure you're not listening through headphones or more than one earbud, whether you're driving a car or riding a bike.

Among the 801 laws that went into effect in the new year is California's two-earbud driving prohibition. While it has long been illegal to drive with headphones that cover your ears, the little buds that are nestled in the ear were excluded from the rule. No more.

Florida Courts Stay Passive Policing Tickets

Florida courts are considering the legality of traffic violations caught on camera and reviewed by contract companies. Hundreds of thousands of tickets are on hold in Miami-Dade and Tampa counties.

The tickets have been repeatedly challenged by defense attorneys arguing that the state improperly delegates police powers, according to the Daily Business Review. In October a judge stayed tickets in Miami-Dade, asking an appellate court to decide whether allowing a private company to review violations caught by a camera counts as legal policing. Tampa, too, has asked its District Court of Appeals to opine on the matter.

Good drivers are always on the lookout for cyclists, and good cyclists always follow the rules of the road. But sometimes those rules aren't obvious.

Like when it comes to groups of riders, are cyclists allowed to ride side by side, or two abreast? Does it matter how fast they're going? Or what kind of road they're on? Bicycle laws can vary by state, so let's take a look:

Trending Traffic Ticket Questions From FindLaw Answers

You've got questions ... we've got answers. If you have not yet asked or answered a question in FindLaw's Answers community, what are you waiting for? This amazing free resource supports a dynamic community of legal consumers and attorneys helping each other out. Simple as that.

We see a lot of great questions in our Answers community every day. Here's a look at some recent questions relating to traffic tickets from our FindLaw Answers boards:

Read the third line from the bottom ... C, F, D, T.

Did you pass the vision test when you got your driver's license? Do you have 20/20 vision? If you need prescription glasses or contact lenses, you probably have a restricted driver's license. But unless you wear your glasses everywhere you go, you may forget to wear your glasses every once in a while.

Can you get a ticket if you drive without your glasses?

Running a stop sign can be three points on your license. A DUI can be four points. And speeding can be anywhere from two to six points, depending on how fast you were going.

Every state has a system for assigning point values to different kinds of traffic offenses, and they can often function in very different ways. So where do these points come from, and how can points affect your license?

T.S. Eliot wrote, "April is the cruellest month." The National Safety Council, on the other hand, declared April Distracted Driving Awareness Month.

The Coalition Against Distracted Driving (CADD) has decided to commemorate the occasion by filing a $1 billion (PER YEAR) lawsuit against Apple for distracting drivers with the Apple Watch, a product that no driver has been distracted by yet.

With the Supreme Court trying to decide whether Texas has to allow a Confederate flag on some of its license plates, it got us to wondering -- what exactly can we put on our license plates?

After all, we're paying for the plate, and it's going on our car. Can't we just put anything we want on our license plate? Then again, it's an official plate, issued by the state and with the state flag emblazoned on it. Can the government limit what kinds of things we can say with our license plates?

As it turns out, quite a few cases have popped up recently regarding free speech on the open road ...

We've all had that experience of finally finding a parking spot and pulling in, only to see that dreaded sign: "RESERVED." And we've all had that next thought -- what would actually happen if I parked here anyway?

It seems like a risky proposition, so let's see if those reserved parking spots are enforceable.