Legal Grounds - FindLaw Legal Humor Blog

Legal Grounds - The FindLaw Legal News with an Attitude Blog


A New Mexico DWI suspect may be in even more trouble after he allegedly tried to bribe an officer with Mountain Dew.

Luis Rodriguez-Neri, 21, was found by officers Monday after they were called to investigate a car that had "slammed into a light pole," reports Albuquerque's KOAT-TV. Rodriguez-Neri allegedly told deputies that he'd tossed back "six shots of Bacardi" before getting behind the wheel, and he refused to take breath or field sobriety tests. It wasn't until he was back at the station that Rodriguez-Neri allegedly offered the officers some sugary Mountain Dew for his sweet release.

What charges does Rodriguez-Neri face for an alleged Mountain Dew bribe? And what if he was just kidding?

A district court in Pennsylvania is apparently fed up with underdressed court visitors and money pulled from places the sun don't shine.

A pair of signs recently posted in York County District Court Judge Ronald J. Haskell Jr.'s courtroom made the court's feelings on the matter clear, reports The York Daily Record. One sign reads, in Spanish we well as English "Money from undergarments will not be accepted in this office." The other sign, taped just below the first, cautions in all capital letters "PAJAMAS ARE NOT APPROPRIATE ATTIRE FOR DISTRICT COURT."

In light of the judge's all-caps admonition, what would be appropriate attire for court?

It can be a major bummer when someone posts an unflattering photo of you on social media.

An Ohio woman was so irritated by a photo of her posted on the Columbus Police Department's Facebook page that she called in, and later came to the station in person to complain, reports The Huffington Post.

Police were more than happy to discuss the issue with her however, being that the woman was wanted on charges of aggravated robbery and kidnapping.

The author of a book called "Creative Screwing" claims that her publisher not-so-creatively screwed her out of royalties.

Nannette Laree Hernandez of Berrien Springs, Michigan -- whose 1993 book "Creative Screwing: A Woman's Guide to Becoming an Erotic Enchantress of Superlustful Sex" was revised in 2011 -- claims that her contract with Spero Publishing includes 20 percent royalties on print copies of the book and 50 percent royalties on electronic copies, reports Courthouse News Service.

According to her lawsuit, however, despite reportedly selling 40,000 copies of the book on Amazon.com, Hernandez has only been paid $20.85 in royalties since distribution of the revised version of her book began in 2011.

A Boston woman who tried to outsmart police by giving them a fake name ended up being arrested on a very real warrant out for a person with the name she had provided.

Tina Lunn was approached by a Boston transit police officer after being observed smoking a cigarette despite several posted "no smoking" signs, reports WXFT-TV. Lunn, who was wanted for warrants in two different Massachusetts counties, allegedly provided a fake name and fake date of birth to the officer.

Unfortunately for her, even her fictitious alter-ego seems to have criminal proclivities.

A Washington man wanted on multiple local and state warrants successfully evaded police for weeks. But his evasive tactics turned out to be no match for a fictional blonde named "Sweet Cheeks."

After being unable to find wanted suspect Corey Butler IRL ("in real life," as the kids say on the Internet these days), police were able to locate him on social media, reports Seattle's KOMO-TV. Police decided to try their hand at "catfishing" -- impersonating a real or fictitious character online, usually to deceive another person. For their catfishing expedition, cops chose a stock "selfie" photo of a blonde woman and dubbed her "Sweet Cheeks."

How hard was it to get Butler to take the bait?

Kansas' governor is preparing to sign a proclamation declaring October to be "Zombie Preparedness Month." But unless he knows something we don't, there have been no reports of zombie activity in the Midwest.

But this hasn't deterred Kansas' Division of Emergency Management from craving brains publicity for its newest initiative. "If you're prepared for zombies, you're prepared for anything," rings the theme of Zombie Preparedness Month. State emergency officials hope that this will prepare Kansas residents from the more likely event of tornadoes, severe storms, and fires.

So how exactly did zombies get involved?

Scotland voters headed to the polls Thursday to decide whether their homeland should secede from the United Kingdom. But could American states vote to do the same?

While there were definitely attempts at secession in the past (Civil War ring a bell?) there are questions about whether there's even a legal right for U.S. states to do so. Vocativ reports that despite talks of U.S. states following Scotland's example, states like Texas don't have the legal authority to secede from the Union.

So can U.S. states legally secede?

A "divorce hotel" is slated to open in upstate New York, but its future customers should check up on the law before they check in.

The Gideon Putnam Resort in Saratoga Springs, New York, is set to be the American launching point for a Dutch-based "Divorce Hotel," one that has already been a "huge success" in the Netherlands, reports ABC's "Good Morning America." Divorce Hotel guests will be treated to two separate rooms, a divorce mediator, and presumably a legal divorce upon check-out.

But what should Divorce Hotel hopefuls know about the legal complications of a future trip?

A Tennessee man made an unfortunate butt-dial while talking about getting high: He called 911.

The Maury County 911 Center received a call Friday night, which police allege was from 25-year-old Grant O'Connor. Nashville's WKRN-TV reports that dispatchers could hear the pocket-dialer talking about "getting high and going to a drug dealer's house." The police traced the call and later arrested O'Connor on marijuana charges.

How did O'Connor butt-dial his way into an arrest?