Legal Grounds - FindLaw Legal Humor Blog

Legal Grounds - The FindLaw Legal News with an Attitude Blog


Ever hear your parents tell you that if you don't behave they'll turn the car around? Well, two drunk female passengers had that experience ... but on a plane.

Canadian police arrested two inebriated twenty-somethings, Lilia Ratmaski and Milana Muzikante, after Sunwing Flight 656 had to be diverted back to Toronto (on its way to Cuba) following a "disruption on board." According to Canada's Global News, the two troublemakers drank a ton of duty-free booze, lit a cigarette in the lavatory, then proceeded to fight and make threats.

Although this was on a Canadian airline, could the same thing happen when departing from the States?

Cable network FXX is currently airing every episode of "The Simpsons" back-to-back, giving hope to children and adults alike in these dark times (at least through Labor Day, when the marathon is set to conclude).

And while our writers are too poor (or shiftless) to pay for this premium cable channel, we can provide you with our recollection of the 10 best legal moments in the history of the decades-long series.

So stop playing Bonestorm and check out our picks for the Top 10 greatest legal moments from "The Simpsons":

A Florida woman's methamphetamine manufacturing operation was allegedly uncovered by police after her 7-year-old son told his uncle, as well as police investigators, that "there's really bad stuff in my mom's car."

Briana Buchanan, 26, and her 7-year-old son had been living with Buchanan's boyfriend's brother, who considers the boy his nephew, reports Central Florida's News 13. The uncle called police after the boy opened up the trunk of his mother's car to show him the "really bad stuff," which turned out to be a mobile meth lab.

What criminal charges is this alleged meth-cooking mom now facing?

A strange case of a man impersonating a TSA agent and giving "screenings" at San Francisco International Airport turned even stranger when prosecutors decided not to file charges against him.

San Mateo County District Attorney Steve Wagstaffe told San Francisco's KPIX-TV that Eric Slighton, 53, would not be charged for allegedly posing as a TSA agent and giving at least two women pat-downs in July. Wagstaffe explained that while the allegations may sound vile, authorities have been unable to identify the two victims, giving the DA no case to pursue. The DA also stands behind his assertion that, somehow, impersonating a TSA agent is not illegal.

How can that be?

The small Minnesota town of Cormorant has elected its first mayor. He's technically only 7 years old, and that's not even the weird part: He's also a dog.

Duke the Great Pyrenees, who's 49 in dog years, defeated his human opponent, local store-owner Richard Sherbrook, in something of a landslide -- if you could really call it that; Cormorant only has 12 residents, reports Fargo, North Dakota's WDAY-TV.

So of course this canine mayor "begs" the question: Is it even legal to elect an animal?

A Florida grandmother claims her experience at a local Great Clips salon was somewhat less than great.

In fact, Vyunda Bradshaw says that her bad haircut is ruining her life, and is demanding $1,000 to compensate for her "pain and suffering." The salon's manager agreed that the cut is unacceptable, but told Orlando's WKMG-TV that the salon can't give the woman the money she's asking for.

What led to Bradshaw's unfortunate haircut? And would pain and suffering damages even be available in her case, if she tries to pursue a lawsuit?

What is art?

An exhibit by Chinese artist Cal Guo-Qiang planned for this weekend's opening of the new Aspen Art Museum that features tortoises with iPads mounted to the animals' shells is being called animal abuse by some. More than 2,000 people having already signed an online petition objecting to the exhibit, reports the The Denver Post.

Is the exhibit art, or is it animal abuse?

In order to become a naturalized U.S. citizen, many immigrants will have to prove their knowledge of U.S. history and government by answering anywhere between 10 and 100 questions on civics. Many natural-born Americans may believe this test is a breeze -- though their grades in high school civics class may beg to differ.

According to the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, 91 percent of applicants as of March 2014 actually do pass the naturalization test. Do you think you can pass it?

Here are 10 citizenship questions to test yourself:

A Massachusetts couple is petitioning the court to legally change their middle names -- which would be nothing out of the ordinary if their proposed new middle names weren't both "Seamonster."

Holyoke resident Melanie Convery describes herself and her husband Neal Coughlin as "pretty private" on Twitter. But they're the talk of the town, thanks to the required legal notice of their petition to change their names in the local paper, reports The Republican.

Can the couple really legally change their middle names to Seamonster?

One Oregon neighborhood is struggling with doughnut vandals in a string of incidents where doughnuts, pastries, and even potato salad has been used to vandalize cars and homes.

The so-called "Bakery Bandits" have struck for the past six weeks in Hillsboro, Oregon, a suburb about 30 minutes west of Portland. Hillsboro Police Lt. Mike Rouches told The Oregonian that in his 25 years of service, he has "never investigated or seen a criminal mischief involving pastries."

Is that the way the cruller crumbles, or are the powdered-sugar perps facing criminal consequences?