Legal Grounds - FindLaw Legal Humor Blog

Legal Grounds - The FindLaw Legal News with an Attitude Blog


A Michigan woman who filed suit against Starbucks after the company stopped making single-serve coffee discs for her brand of coffee maker has settled her lawsuit.

How much was the woman able to get out of Starbucks and Kraft Foods, the maker of her Tassimo coffee maker, after two-and-a half-years of litigation? $250, reports The Grand Rapids Press.

What led to this slow-brewed settlement and why might this it end up costing Starbucks a lot more than $250 when all is said and done?

A Texas school district police officer may be getting the boot after being accused of asking a woman to let him lick her feet in exchange for not taking her to jail.

A woman says she wasn't breaking any traffic laws when was pulled by Cy-Fair Independent School District officer Patrick Quinn in August, reports KTRK-TV. Quinn placed the woman the back of his patrol vehicle after saying he smelled marijuana in the car, which the woman denies. After searching her car, Quinn told the woman he had found drug paraphernalia, which the woman also denies is true.

But if that sounds bad, what the woman says Quinn did next is even worse.

A senior airman in the U.S. Air Force has pleaded guilty to disruptive intoxication after giving a police officer a "Wet Willy" over the weekend.

Riley Swearingen, 24, pleaded guilty to the misdemeanor charge Monday in a Mankato, Minnesota, courtroom, reports The Associated Press. Swearingen agreed to the plea deal after initially being charged with a peculiar felony for the apparent prank.

How did Swearingen's moistened fingers end up in the ears of one of Mankato's finest?

A California woman was arrested Sunday after getting stuck in the chimney of a man she had met online and dated briefly.

Genoveva Nunez-Figueroa, 30, had to be rescued by firefighters after becoming lodged in the chimney of a home in Thousand Oaks, reports the Los Angeles Times. The homeowner said that he'd met the woman online and gone on several dates with her before recently breaking off the relationship.

Following her rescue by Ventura County firefighters, Nunez-Figueroa was arrested. What charges might she now be facing?

A New Mexico DWI suspect may be in even more trouble after he allegedly tried to bribe an officer with Mountain Dew.

Luis Rodriguez-Neri, 21, was found by officers Monday after they were called to investigate a car that had "slammed into a light pole," reports Albuquerque's KOAT-TV. Rodriguez-Neri allegedly told deputies that he'd tossed back "six shots of Bacardi" before getting behind the wheel, and he refused to take breath or field sobriety tests. It wasn't until he was back at the station that Rodriguez-Neri allegedly offered the officers some sugary Mountain Dew for his sweet release.

What charges does Rodriguez-Neri face for an alleged Mountain Dew bribe? And what if he was just kidding?

A district court in Pennsylvania is apparently fed up with underdressed court visitors and money pulled from places the sun don't shine.

A pair of signs recently posted in York County District Court Judge Ronald J. Haskell Jr.'s courtroom made the court's feelings on the matter clear, reports The York Daily Record. One sign reads, in Spanish we well as English "Money from undergarments will not be accepted in this office." The other sign, taped just below the first, cautions in all capital letters "PAJAMAS ARE NOT APPROPRIATE ATTIRE FOR DISTRICT COURT."

In light of the judge's all-caps admonition, what would be appropriate attire for court?

It can be a major bummer when someone posts an unflattering photo of you on social media.

An Ohio woman was so irritated by a photo of her posted on the Columbus Police Department's Facebook page that she called in, and later came to the station in person to complain, reports The Huffington Post.

Police were more than happy to discuss the issue with her however, being that the woman was wanted on charges of aggravated robbery and kidnapping.

The author of a book called "Creative Screwing" claims that her publisher not-so-creatively screwed her out of royalties.

Nannette Laree Hernandez of Berrien Springs, Michigan -- whose 1993 book "Creative Screwing: A Woman's Guide to Becoming an Erotic Enchantress of Superlustful Sex" was revised in 2011 -- claims that her contract with Spero Publishing includes 20 percent royalties on print copies of the book and 50 percent royalties on electronic copies, reports Courthouse News Service.

According to her lawsuit, however, despite reportedly selling 40,000 copies of the book on Amazon.com, Hernandez has only been paid $20.85 in royalties since distribution of the revised version of her book began in 2011.

A Boston woman who tried to outsmart police by giving them a fake name ended up being arrested on a very real warrant out for a person with the name she had provided.

Tina Lunn was approached by a Boston transit police officer after being observed smoking a cigarette despite several posted "no smoking" signs, reports WXFT-TV. Lunn, who was wanted for warrants in two different Massachusetts counties, allegedly provided a fake name and fake date of birth to the officer.

Unfortunately for her, even her fictitious alter-ego seems to have criminal proclivities.

A Washington man wanted on multiple local and state warrants successfully evaded police for weeks. But his evasive tactics turned out to be no match for a fictional blonde named "Sweet Cheeks."

After being unable to find wanted suspect Corey Butler IRL ("in real life," as the kids say on the Internet these days), police were able to locate him on social media, reports Seattle's KOMO-TV. Police decided to try their hand at "catfishing" -- impersonating a real or fictitious character online, usually to deceive another person. For their catfishing expedition, cops chose a stock "selfie" photo of a blonde woman and dubbed her "Sweet Cheeks."

How hard was it to get Butler to take the bait?