Man Stole Marijuana from Cops Because it 'Smelled So Good' - Legal Grounds
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Man Stole Marijuana from Cops Because it 'Smelled So Good'

You remember those days as a child when Grandma was baking? You could smell those muffins from a mile away. They smelt so good that you just had to sneak one.

And you remember when you were a bit older and there was that girl at the local Walmart, and her booty just looked so good that you just had to grab it?

That same irresistible impulse that led to your obesity and a short jail stint must have been what overcame 27-year-old David Allen Thompson of Charleroi, Pennsylvania. According to MSNBC, he was visiting the police department to provide information to Officer David Kimball on an unrelated case. They walked into a patrol room, where lo and behold, the most magnificent of smells attracted Mr. Thompson.

He was powerless to stop himself. "That bud smelled so good," he told the officers. Besides, it was just, "a little bit of weed!"

Now, thanks to the Internet, he'll forever be known as a pothead, a thief, and a snitch. He didn't even get to sample the merchandise.

Though it was only "a little bit of weed," he'll be facing charges for theft, receiving stolen property, tampering with or fabricating evidence, possession of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia.

It's only fair. Not only did he steal, but the theft of another case's evidence could jeopardize that case. In order to present the evidence against a defendant, the officers will have to show that it is what they purport it to be. They do this by demonstrating the chain of custody, from defendant to court. Now they'll have to explain why weed was sitting unattended and was abducted by a third party.

As for Mr. Thompson, he could always try to plead temporary insanity. Though Pennsylvania doesn't excuse actions that were the product of an irresistable impulse, they do excuse actions that were a product of a mental disease or defect. He could argue that the cumulative effect of years of weed smoking had damaged his brain to the extent that he could no longer appreciate the nature and quality of his act.

Who are we kidding? The jury would have to be high to believe that.

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