Fed Worker Reprimanded for Farting Too Much - Legal Grounds
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Fed Worker Reprimanded for Farting Too Much

Government bureaucrats are often criticized for "farting around," but never quite like this: A federal worker recently got a formal reprimand for farting in the workplace.

The unidentified Social Security Administration employee received a formal letter of discipline for "excessive workplace flatulence," reports The Huffington Post.

The five-page reprimand detailed the dates and times of the Baltimore-based employee's offenses. The letter stated that the worker's "uncontrollable flatulence" created an "intolerable" and "hostile" environment for coworkers.

The letter specified 17 different days when the worker allegedly let loose 60 different times. While these were documented incidents of farting, you can probably bet that the employee let it rip a lot more than that.

Many of the employee's coworkers had lodged formal complaints, and the letter of discipline was a last resort by management, reports HuffPo.

It's safe to say that everyone has farted at work at some point or another, or had the unpleasantness of having to smell a coworker's fart. But you probably never thought of lodging a formal complaint. So one can only imagine how bad it was in this workplace for multiple employees to complain and for management to take formal action against the employee.

Prior to the letter, the employer apparently tried to address the issue with the employee through informal means, reports HuffPo.

While you may have heard of employees being fired for other strange reasons (for example, being too attractive), you may be wondering if this farting employee may similarly be at risk of losing his job.

If the worker doesn't have a disability, which typically involves more than merely being gassy, then the employer may be in the right to discipline the worker. But if there indeed is a legitimate medical condition leading to the passing of gas, the employer may need to consider accommodating the worker instead of disciplining him.

Perhaps a private office is in order?

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