Legal Grounds - The FindLaw Legal News with an Attitude Blog

September 2014 Archives

Woman Gives Cop Fake Name, Gets Arrested on Warrants

A Boston woman who tried to outsmart police by giving them a fake name ended up being arrested on a very real warrant out for a person with the name she had provided.

Tina Lunn was approached by a Boston transit police officer after being observed smoking a cigarette despite several posted "no smoking" signs, reports WXFT-TV. Lunn, who was wanted for warrants in two different Massachusetts counties, allegedly provided a fake name and fake date of birth to the officer.

Unfortunately for her, even her fictitious alter-ego seems to have criminal proclivities.

Cops 'Catfish' Suspect by Posing as Girl Named 'Sweet Cheeks'

A Washington man wanted on multiple local and state warrants successfully evaded police for weeks. But his evasive tactics turned out to be no match for a fictional blonde named "Sweet Cheeks."

After being unable to find wanted suspect Corey Butler IRL ("in real life," as the kids say on the Internet these days), police were able to locate him on social media, reports Seattle's KOMO-TV. Police decided to try their hand at "catfishing" -- impersonating a real or fictitious character online, usually to deceive another person. For their catfishing expedition, cops chose a stock "selfie" photo of a blonde woman and dubbed her "Sweet Cheeks."

How hard was it to get Butler to take the bait?

Why Is Kansas Preparing for a Zombie Apocalypse?

Kansas' governor is preparing to sign a proclamation declaring October to be "Zombie Preparedness Month." But unless he knows something we don't, there have been no reports of zombie activity in the Midwest.

But this hasn't deterred Kansas' Division of Emergency Management from craving brains publicity for its newest initiative. "If you're prepared for zombies, you're prepared for anything," rings the theme of Zombie Preparedness Month. State emergency officials hope that this will prepare Kansas residents from the more likely event of tornadoes, severe storms, and fires.

So how exactly did zombies get involved?

Scotland Secession Vote: Can U.S. States Do the Same?

Scotland voters headed to the polls Thursday to decide whether their homeland should secede from the United Kingdom. But could American states vote to do the same?

While there were definitely attempts at secession in the past (Civil War ring a bell?) there are questions about whether there's even a legal right for U.S. states to do so. Vocativ reports that despite talks of U.S. states following Scotland's example, states like Texas don't have the legal authority to secede from the Union.

So can U.S. states legally secede?

'Divorce Hotel' May Not Provide a Quick 'Check-Out' From Marriage

A "divorce hotel" is slated to open in upstate New York, but its future customers should check up on the law before they check in.

The Gideon Putnam Resort in Saratoga Springs, New York, is set to be the American launching point for a Dutch-based "Divorce Hotel," one that has already been a "huge success" in the Netherlands, reports ABC's "Good Morning America." Divorce Hotel guests will be treated to two separate rooms, a divorce mediator, and presumably a legal divorce upon check-out.

But what should Divorce Hotel hopefuls know about the legal complications of a future trip?

Tenn. Man Butt-Dials 911, Gets Arrested for Pot

A Tennessee man made an unfortunate butt-dial while talking about getting high: He called 911.

The Maury County 911 Center received a call Friday night, which police allege was from 25-year-old Grant O'Connor. Nashville's WKRN-TV reports that dispatchers could hear the pocket-dialer talking about "getting high and going to a drug dealer's house." The police traced the call and later arrested O'Connor on marijuana charges.

How did O'Connor butt-dial his way into an arrest?

'Extremely Drunk' Woman Arrested for Attempting to Pick Up Kid

A Florida woman who showed up drunk at an elementary school to pick up a child picked up several criminal charges instead.

Sheriff's deputies say that Renata Congleton was "extremely drunk" when she arrived at a local elementary school to pick up an unidentified child last week, reports WFLA-TV. School staff refused to let her take the child with her and instead called law enforcement.

Just how drunk is "extremely drunk," and what kinds of criminal charges is Congleton now facing?

Statutory Rape Victim Owes Child Support for Kid Conceived When He Was a Teen

An Arizona man who was the victim of statutory rape in his teens is now being ordered to pay child support for the daughter conceived during the illicit encounter.

Nick Olivas claims he never knew about the daughter he fathered when he was 14 with an adult woman until he was served with child support papers two years ago, reports The Arizona Republic.

How can Olivas be liable for child support for a child he fathered when he was legally raped?