Legal Grounds - The FindLaw Legal News with an Attitude Blog

March 2015 Archives

Regifting. This Time it's a Crime!

Don't you just hate it when you give someone a gift, and they just hide it away in the back of a closet? Or maybe give it to someone else? You spent hard earned money on that gift! Go ahead, be angry. Just don't break into their house to take it back.

A Burnsville, Minnesota man was recently arrested for burglary after he stormed into his neighbor's house to take back an unappreciated Christmas gift. Let's call this man Mr. Grinch. Mr. Grinch gave a friend a knife set for Christmas. Angry that she wasn't using the knife set in the agreed way (we do so hope he meant cooking), he demanded the knife set back. The friend agreed to give it back. But before she could go get them, he pushed his way into her home, took the knives, and absconded.

Police later found and arrested Mr. Grinch. Is he guilty?

Once again, a restroom at a Walmart has been converted into an impromptu meth lab, The Associated Press reports. Meth, an illegal stimulant, is often produced in so-called "clandestine chemistry" labs. As police have cracked down on home-based labs, which have a tendency to explode, artisanal meth makers have pursued more creative lab locations such as cars, backpacks, and big-box store bathrooms.

One enterprising Walter White wannabe (or just an run of the mill meth-head) combined two novel meth-making methods in Muncie, Indiana. Employees at the local Walmart discovered last Thursday that someone had been brewing meth out of a backpack stored in their restroom. Two arrests have been made.

You might think we don't need a list of things you shouldn't tell the cops. Then you might read the story of an Ohio man who called 911 to complain that his wife stole his cocaine.

In the most predictable turn of events ever, the man was promptly arrested when officers responded to the call.

A 76-year old man protested a law prohibiting him from feeding feral cats by spending nine days in jail.

David Parton has been feeding stray cats in Gainesville, Texas, for the last 10 years. Because a city code makes feeding a stray animal a public nuisance, Parton received several fines adding up to $900. Believing that the law was wrong, Parton refused to pay the fine, opting to spend the nine days in jail instead.

So why is feeding cats illegal?