Legal Grounds - The FindLaw Legal News with an Attitude Blog

October 2016 Archives

While there is not actually a professional job as a tenant, James Regan and others like him have earned the moniker due to their ability to abuse eviction laws. Regan, a 62-year-old mustachioed man from Toronto, Canada, has been living in upscale Toronto apartments since 2014 without paying any rent. The Toronto resident is facing his third eviction since 2014 for not paying rent, and despite his best efforts to fire the hearing officer, it looks all but certain that the eviction will be upheld on appeal.

While he has been evicted three times since 2014, that hasn't phased him one bit. He's a professional! While fending off the legal system after each eviction attempt (all part of a day's work), he was able to maintain possession of his units (rent free!). Naturally, Regan claims he's not abusing the system.

Yep. Yeah. Uh-huh. You can totally get fired if you decide it's a good idea to turn up N.W.A.'s "F* Tha Police" as a few officers stroll into your restaurant to eat. It won't help matters to dance, laugh, and sing along when a deputy comes over to ask you about it. And it certainly won't help your case if that same deputy happens to be a regular customer and know the restaurant's owner, while you are just a lowly dishwasher.

So yeah, sorry dude. Good luck with the job hunt after that.

Harris Faulkner, the toy hamster, is no longer going to be sold thanks to Harris Faulkner, the Fox news anchor that sued for $5 million because Hasbro made a toy that accidently shared the same name as ... what was her name again? The popular toy was sold as part of the Littlest Pet Shop line of toys, where adorable little plastic animals are designed for children to obsess over until their parents buy them.

In the news anchor's 2015 complaint, Faulkner alleged that the little plastic doll had caused her both commercial and emotional damages. In July of this year, the court dismissed Hasbro's motion to dismiss the complaint, explaining that the allegation that Hasbro used the same name was sufficient to allow the lawsuit to be heard by the court.

It's been a long strange piss for San Francisco's first open-air public urinal, also known as a pissoir. Installed earlier this year as Dolores Park was undergoing renovations, the concrete circle, complete with drain and semicircular concrete splash guard, attracted quite a few visitors and quite a bit of media attention. It also garnered one lawsuit that claimed "[t]he open-air urination hole violates the privacy of those who need to use the restroom but would be required to expose their bodies and suffer the shame and degradation of urinating in public view."

That "be required" part was a bit of a stretch, seeing as how the park also provided 26 private, enclosed bathrooms. But a San Francisco judge has decided that the entire lawsuit is much ado about micturation and ruled that the pissoir is not a civil rights violation.

First, they came for our never-ending supply of breakfast cocktails ... Yes, the bottomless mimosa, that staple of brunch from sea to drunken sea, is apparently illegal in the Lone Star state.

How is this even possible? To what beverage shall we now turn when our hangovers need nursing? The Bloody Mary? The *gasp* Michelada? Oh, the humanity!!