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First, they came for our never-ending supply of breakfast cocktails ... Yes, the bottomless mimosa, that staple of brunch from sea to drunken sea, is apparently illegal in the Lone Star state.

How is this even possible? To what beverage shall we now turn when our hangovers need nursing? The Bloody Mary? The *gasp* Michelada? Oh, the humanity!!

Colorado legalized recreational marijuana use a few years ago and neighbors of the Rocky Mountain State lost their collective minds. Nebraska and Oklahoma sued Colorado, hoping the Supreme Court would clamp down on the state's new pot laws. And apparently Kansas cops have just been pulling over every car with Colorado plates, claiming that just having license plates from a weed-legal state was grounds for detention and search.

But the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals isn't buying it, nor was it buying two Kansas Highway Patrol officers' claims of immunity for calling drug-sniffing dogs to a traffic stop, just because the driver had Colorado plates.

Yes you can. If you're flying down a Barcelona street and manage not to get caught in the act, apparently. One disabled daredevil tested the limits of traffic enforcement in the Catalonia capital recently and got away scot-free, so far.

So is this brave soul a commute revolutionary or a cautionary tale? Let's take a look.

We are a nation of laws, and even in tough times we consider our commitment to the rule of law to define us. Even if someone is saying something we don't like, we respect their First Amendment right to say it. Even if we think someone is guilty, they are still entitled to Fourth Amendment protections against unreasonable search and seizure and Sixth Amendment rights to a fair trial. This commitment may be why it's fun to imagine a world where we don't follow the law for a little while.

If you haven't seen the movies by now, you've probably seen a preview or three, or heard "The Purge" was coming to your town for real. The basic premise of the film (and its two sequels) is that, for 12 straight hours per year, all crime is legal and all emergency services will be unavailable. Billed as a civic tradition in the movie's timeline, it has the effect of reducing crime and unemployment. Beyond the wistful, "wouldn't it be fun to run around and do whatever you want for a day" fantasy, could suspending all laws temporarily even be legal?

Another adventure in the ongoing saga of legalized marijuana: today’s episode comes straight from Happy — too happy? — Valley, Oregon, where 18-year-old Alan Alcantara, who could not look any more stoned in his mugshot, drove himself and a friend to the Stumptown Cannabis dispensary at 1:05 a.m. Sunday morning. Sorry, no, he drove himself and a friend into the Stumptown Cannabis dispensary at 1:05 a.m. Sunday morning.

The most shocking part of Alcantara’s tale? He might’ve been high.

Maybe you have the physique of an Olympic swimmer. Or, at least you have the confidence of someone with the physique of an Olympic swimmer. Either way, you know you look good in a thong and you want other people to know you look good in a thong. Now that it's officially summer, you're probably thinking it's time for a "sun's out, buns out" day at your local public pool. Well, you might want to rethink that one.

Police removed a Kansas man from a public pool for sunbathing in a thong. And it wasn't his first time, either.

Nothing is life is free. Not lunch, not HBO, not even love. And definitely not hugs. So while a sign saying "Free Hugs" might seem like an altruistic act of simple kindness, you better be ready to tip the man carrying that sign, or face an assault.

At least, that can be the case in Times Square, where Jermaine Himmelstein was recently arrested (for the 17th time) and charged with robbery after punching a Canadian tourist in Times Square after she took him up on his offer of free hugs. So how did a friendly sign and the world's friendliest country turn into a felony?

There's a time and place for everything, and it's called college. There's also a time and place for Snapchatting, and it's not while traveling 107 mph on a suburban road at night with your two passengers begging you to slow down. Because that's when you go barreling into another car, giving that car's driver serious permanent brain injuries, and get yourself and Snapchat sued in the process.

But how is an innocent Millennial supposed to know she can't Snapchat and drive, when the app has a filter that allows users to record their speed while Snapchatting?

In a case that stretched the limits of both dram shop laws and employer liability, a Dayton, Ohio strip club called The Living Room was found not liable for injuries caused by one of its strippers after a drunk driving accident.

A state appeals court overturned $1.43 million of a $2.85 million jury award that originally found the club as equally responsible as Mary Montgomery, the stripper who drank beer at the club before plowing into another car, severely injuring two people.

To the delight of some and the dismay of others, purchasing wild animals -- lions, and tigers, and bears, oh my! -- has been relatively easy in the United States. Private individuals, not just zoos and sanctuaries, were able to amass collections of exotic animals, sometimes with tragic results.

But the days of stocking your mansion or estate with rare species may be over. Two new federal laws regarding the breeding, purchase, and sale of tigers in the U.S. will increase oversight and curb illicit tiger ownership. So getting a Bengal for your birthday may not be so easy anymore.