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It's been a long strange piss for San Francisco's first open-air public urinal, also known as a pissoir. Installed earlier this year as Dolores Park was undergoing renovations, the concrete circle, complete with drain and semicircular concrete splash guard, attracted quite a few visitors and quite a bit of media attention. It also garnered one lawsuit that claimed "[t]he open-air urination hole violates the privacy of those who need to use the restroom but would be required to expose their bodies and suffer the shame and degradation of urinating in public view."

That "be required" part was a bit of a stretch, seeing as how the park also provided 26 private, enclosed bathrooms. But a San Francisco judge has decided that the entire lawsuit is much ado about micturation and ruled that the pissoir is not a civil rights violation.

To the delight of some and the dismay of others, purchasing wild animals -- lions, and tigers, and bears, oh my! -- has been relatively easy in the United States. Private individuals, not just zoos and sanctuaries, were able to amass collections of exotic animals, sometimes with tragic results.

But the days of stocking your mansion or estate with rare species may be over. Two new federal laws regarding the breeding, purchase, and sale of tigers in the U.S. will increase oversight and curb illicit tiger ownership. So getting a Bengal for your birthday may not be so easy anymore.

PA Judge Bans PJs in Court

The fashion police in Catawissa Township apparently don't appreciate a nice pair of pajama bottoms like the rest of us. Or at least the judges in the Columbia County District Court don't. Magisterial District Judge Craig Long posted a sign in the lobby outside his courtroom, reading, "PAJAMAS ARE NOT APPROPRIATE ATTIRE FOR DISTRICT COURT."

Well excuse us, Mr. Justice of the Chic, we didn't expect to take fashion advice from someone who put on a robe to come to work today.

How do you balance a state budget that has you spending $250 million more than you'll take in? Most conservative lawmakers would slash funding to education and social services or roll back Medicaid or social security benefits. The last thing you'd expect a Republican-led state legislature to do is raise taxes.

But that's what Alabama is doing. And not just any tax -- Alabama is planning on taxing porn to the tune of 40%. But don't worry, the idea doesn't just sound silly, but it might not work at all and be unconstitutional to boot. Roll Tide!

The brave city council of Beaver Dam, Wisconsin responded swiftly and decisively to the scourge of kangaroo service animals in the town.

After a woman brazenly took her therapy kangaroo into a McDonald's in February, the city was thrown into a crisis over which species can be used as service animals. By categorically limiting service animals to dogs and mini horses, Beaver Dam has saved an untold number of lives and potentially millions, if not billions, of dollars.

New Hampshire really cares about protecting babies from drinking beer.

New Hampshire recently passed a law that would allow babies to be depicted on its beer bottles. Can you believe that this was even illegal in the first place?

However, the law has been vetoed by Governor Maggie Hassan.

Del. Residents Can Smile Again for Driver's License Photos

Another place where Don Rickles can't go anymore! Effective immediately, Delaware driver's license applicants can show their pearly whites. Thanks to a software upgrade, drivers will once again be permitted to smile in driver's license photos.

The new policy ends five years of depressed and angry photographs caused by a facial recognition system that got confused by smiles.

Why Is Kansas Preparing for a Zombie Apocalypse?

Kansas' governor is preparing to sign a proclamation declaring October to be "Zombie Preparedness Month." But unless he knows something we don't, there have been no reports of zombie activity in the Midwest.

But this hasn't deterred Kansas' Division of Emergency Management from craving brains publicity for its newest initiative. "If you're prepared for zombies, you're prepared for anything," rings the theme of Zombie Preparedness Month. State emergency officials hope that this will prepare Kansas residents from the more likely event of tornadoes, severe storms, and fires.

So how exactly did zombies get involved?

Scotland Secession Vote: Can U.S. States Do the Same?

Scotland voters headed to the polls Thursday to decide whether their homeland should secede from the United Kingdom. But could American states vote to do the same?

While there were definitely attempts at secession in the past (Civil War ring a bell?) there are questions about whether there's even a legal right for U.S. states to do so. Vocativ reports that despite talks of U.S. states following Scotland's example, states like Texas don't have the legal authority to secede from the Union.

So can U.S. states legally secede?

For 'Shark Week,' 5 Shark Laws You May Not Know About

In celebration of Discovery Channel's "Shark Week," now in its 26th year, we thought it'd be only appropriate to remind you about some shark laws.

Because despite Steven Spielberg's still incredibly frightening thriller that might peg sharks as our enemies, they're not. And like many other misunderstood creatures, the law does what it can to protect and treat them fairly.

So, with that said, here are five shark laws that you may not know about: