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A Boston woman who tried to outsmart police by giving them a fake name ended up being arrested on a very real warrant out for a person with the name she had provided.

Tina Lunn was approached by a Boston transit police officer after being observed smoking a cigarette despite several posted "no smoking" signs, reports WXFT-TV. Lunn, who was wanted for warrants in two different Massachusetts counties, allegedly provided a fake name and fake date of birth to the officer.

Unfortunately for her, even her fictitious alter-ego seems to have criminal proclivities.

A Washington man wanted on multiple local and state warrants successfully evaded police for weeks. But his evasive tactics turned out to be no match for a fictional blonde named "Sweet Cheeks."

After being unable to find wanted suspect Corey Butler IRL ("in real life," as the kids say on the Internet these days), police were able to locate him on social media, reports Seattle's KOMO-TV. Police decided to try their hand at "catfishing" -- impersonating a real or fictitious character online, usually to deceive another person. For their catfishing expedition, cops chose a stock "selfie" photo of a blonde woman and dubbed her "Sweet Cheeks."

How hard was it to get Butler to take the bait?

A Tennessee man made an unfortunate butt-dial while talking about getting high: He called 911.

The Maury County 911 Center received a call Friday night, which police allege was from 25-year-old Grant O'Connor. Nashville's WKRN-TV reports that dispatchers could hear the pocket-dialer talking about "getting high and going to a drug dealer's house." The police traced the call and later arrested O'Connor on marijuana charges.

How did O'Connor butt-dial his way into an arrest?

A Florida woman who showed up drunk at an elementary school to pick up a child picked up several criminal charges instead.

Sheriff's deputies say that Renata Congleton was "extremely drunk" when she arrived at a local elementary school to pick up an unidentified child last week, reports WFLA-TV. School staff refused to let her take the child with her and instead called law enforcement.

Just how drunk is "extremely drunk," and what kinds of criminal charges is Congleton now facing?

Ever hear your parents tell you that if you don't behave they'll turn the car around? Well, two drunk female passengers had that experience ... but on a plane.

Canadian police arrested two inebriated twenty-somethings, Lilia Ratmaski and Milana Muzikante, after Sunwing Flight 656 had to be diverted back to Toronto (on its way to Cuba) following a "disruption on board." According to Canada's Global News, the two troublemakers drank a ton of duty-free booze, lit a cigarette in the lavatory, then proceeded to fight and make threats.

Although this was on a Canadian airline, could the same thing happen when departing from the States?

A Florida woman's methamphetamine manufacturing operation was allegedly uncovered by police after her 7-year-old son told his uncle, as well as police investigators, that "there's really bad stuff in my mom's car."

Briana Buchanan, 26, and her 7-year-old son had been living with Buchanan's boyfriend's brother, who considers the boy his nephew, reports Central Florida's News 13. The uncle called police after the boy opened up the trunk of his mother's car to show him the "really bad stuff," which turned out to be a mobile meth lab.

What criminal charges is this alleged meth-cooking mom now facing?

A man who allegedly posed as a TSA screener and gave two female passengers a pat-down has been arrested at San Francisco International Airport (SFO) for public drunkenness.

The 53-year-old man, whose name has yet to be released, was arrested Tuesday after duping real TSA agents long enough to "direct a couple of women into a private booth for pat downs," reports SFGate.com. Apparently the ruse was accomplished by the use of khaki pants, a blue polo shirt, and blue rubber gloves.

The TSA is still investigating the incident, but this fake screener will likely face some real charges.

People typically run from police in an attempt to stay out of jail for as long as they can. But an Oklahoma woman who led police on a high-speed chase Tuesday had a somewhat different goal in mind.

Police say 34-year-old Luz Avilla refused to pull over, reaching speeds of up to 100 mph, supposedly because she was hoping to make it to the next county over. "Apparently she did not want to go to jail in Grady County," a police officer told Oklahoma City's KWTV. "She wanted to go to jail in Caddo County was her explanation as to why she did not pull over."

Unfortunately for Avilla, she came up a few miles short and was booked (in Grady County) on charges including driving under the influence and eluding police.

Avilla's quest for the county line does bring up an interesting question, though: Can an inmate in one jail request a transfer to another?

A Michigan man is facing serious charges after leading police on a bizarre low-speed chase atop a John Deere tractor.

Officers with the Cheboygan Department of Public Safety responded to a report of a shirtless man driving a tractor through a residential neighborhood. They found 35-year-old Joshua Viau operating the tractor allegedly while intoxicated, reports the Cheybogan Daily Tribune.

But then, what could have just been another notable DUI arrest took a turn for the strange(r).

Men visiting the Tewksbury, Massachusetts, Public Library told police that a woman was offering to help them straighten out their Longfellow. Only they weren't talking about the poet.

According to Boston's WBZ-TV, when police sent a plainclothes detective to the library to investigate the reports, 20-year-old Brittany Mcintyre of Nashua, New Hampshire, quietly passed the officer a note offering to exchange a sex act for $60.

What kind of charges will this literary lover be facing for her alleged solicitation in the stacks?