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If you're going to have sex with your high school teacher, you probably want to get it on tape. After all, your friends might not believe you if you just told them. So maybe you record it on your cell phone and share it with a few or eleven of your friends.

This would actually be a bad idea. Because, unless you had the teacher's permission to tape the encounter, you may have just committed a felony. And that teacher might sue you.

Gold, frankincense, and myrrh are nothing compared to some dank Purple Kush or sticky Strawberry Cough. So while the Biblical Magi may have been kind to baby Jesus, the volunteers for Cannabis Can were the real heroes when they gave free joints to Denver's homeless for Christmas.

We're not sure whether those joints contained some sweet, sweet Sour Diesel or fuzzy Super Silver Haze, but we're pretty sure the presents were appreciated. "Merry Christmas and a puff puff, New Year's," one woman told volunteers while accepting a joint.

To some, Gollum was "a small slimy creature," bent by obsession and greed. To others, he was a tortured soul whose tragic corruption ultimately leads to victory. While most are free to disagree about one of J. J. R. Tolkien's more notorious characters, not so for Bilgin Ciftci, who faces two years in a Turkish prison for comparing the country's president to the twisted fictional being.

If Gollum is a bad guy, Ciftci could be guilty of "insulting a public official;" if he's a good guy, Ciftci could beat the charge. So who decides?

Can the KKK Adopt a Highway?

November is National Adoption Month. Dating couples are adopting dogs; married couples are adopting children; spinsters are taking in a few dozen more cats; and the Ku Klux Klan is trying to adopt a stretch of highway in north Georgia.

The Klan is excited about adding a one-mile span of Route 515 to its family, and filled out the proper adoption paperwork. But these things take time, and the approval of the Georgia Supreme Court.

Pastafarian Wins Right to Wear Spaghetti Strainer in MA License Photo

While the world is burning over deeply held religious beliefs, one woman in Massachusetts has succeeded in her quest for official respect for her farcical faith, Pastafarianism. Her driver's license photo will reflect the religion's creed by showing her with a spaghetti strainer, according to the Boston Globe.

It sounds absurd, perhaps, but given the international uproar over religious headdress in official identifications in recent years, the spaghetti strainer was an important symbolic win for Lindsay Miller and Pastafarians. The Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster is a parody but not anti-religion, and she says she did have other women of faith in mind when she first sought a license wearing a spaghetti strainer.

Salem, Massachusetts is famous for its witch trials. And now the world's most famous warlock is subject to an order of protection after being sued in Salem by a witch priestess. Lori Bruno-Sforza owns a witchcraft store in Salem and claims to be descended from a long line of witches. She also claims that Christian Day, who also owns occult stores in Salem and New Orleans and self-describes as "the world's best-known warlock," has been harassing her for the last three years, over the phone and on social media.

On Wednesday, a Salem judge ruled in Sforza's favor, ordering Day not to contact her or come within 100 yards of her home or business for a year.

Not everyone sees jury duty as the kind of essential civic responsibility that you and I do. Whereas we revel in the chance to serve in our nation's courts and participate in our legal justice system, others see it as an inconvenience, one to be avoided at all costs.

Alisia Carnes could be one of those people. Why else would she disobey a court order forbidding potential jurors from reading about the case? But if she was attempting to disqualify herself from serving on a jury, it didn't quite work -- the judge sentenced her to six more months of jury duty.

Warner/Chappell Music, Inc. claims it's 205 years old. That's a lot of birthdays. Its next celebration may not be so happy, since it will start paying back 80 years worth of royalties it collected from the tune "Happy Birthday to You."

A U.S. judge ruled that Warner/Chappell's copyright on the song was invalid, meaning the company could owe millions it has collected in commercial use licenses.

Americans hate paying tickets. But they do love to protest. And they can be creative when it comes to paying what they feel are unjustified tickets under protest.

Luckily, the courts have supported these exercises of our First Amendment rights. Even the right to scrawl "F**K YOUR S**TTY TOWN BITCHES" on our speeding tickets.

It's like my mother always told me: put criminal court proceedings in Florida on a live webcam, and you just might end up with a porn star flashing the judge. Now that might sound like nothing more than folksy wisdom to you, but that's exactly what happened in a Broward County court last week.

Popular county judge John Hurley and the rest of his courtroom caught an eye-full when Susan "Kayla Kupcakes" Surrette attempted to demonstrate injuries she received during her arrest.