Legal Grounds: weird news Archives
Legal Grounds - The FindLaw Legal News with an Attitude Blog

Recently in weird news Category

A district court in Pennsylvania is apparently fed up with underdressed court visitors and money pulled from places the sun don't shine.

A pair of signs recently posted in York County District Court Judge Ronald J. Haskell Jr.'s courtroom made the court's feelings on the matter clear, reports The York Daily Record. One sign reads, in Spanish we well as English "Money from undergarments will not be accepted in this office." The other sign, taped just below the first, cautions in all capital letters "PAJAMAS ARE NOT APPROPRIATE ATTIRE FOR DISTRICT COURT."

In light of the judge's all-caps admonition, what would be appropriate attire for court?

The author of a book called "Creative Screwing" claims that her publisher not-so-creatively screwed her out of royalties.

Nannette Laree Hernandez of Berrien Springs, Michigan -- whose 1993 book "Creative Screwing: A Woman's Guide to Becoming an Erotic Enchantress of Superlustful Sex" was revised in 2011 -- claims that her contract with Spero Publishing includes 20 percent royalties on print copies of the book and 50 percent royalties on electronic copies, reports Courthouse News Service.

According to her lawsuit, however, despite reportedly selling 40,000 copies of the book on Amazon.com, Hernandez has only been paid $20.85 in royalties since distribution of the revised version of her book began in 2011.

Kansas' governor is preparing to sign a proclamation declaring October to be "Zombie Preparedness Month." But unless he knows something we don't, there have been no reports of zombie activity in the Midwest.

But this hasn't deterred Kansas' Division of Emergency Management from craving brains publicity for its newest initiative. "If you're prepared for zombies, you're prepared for anything," rings the theme of Zombie Preparedness Month. State emergency officials hope that this will prepare Kansas residents from the more likely event of tornadoes, severe storms, and fires.

So how exactly did zombies get involved?

An Arizona man who was the victim of statutory rape in his teens is now being ordered to pay child support for the daughter conceived during the illicit encounter.

Nick Olivas claims he never knew about the daughter he fathered when he was 14 with an adult woman until he was served with child support papers two years ago, reports The Arizona Republic.

How can Olivas be liable for child support for a child he fathered when he was legally raped?

A strange case of a man impersonating a TSA agent and giving "screenings" at San Francisco International Airport turned even stranger when prosecutors decided not to file charges against him.

San Mateo County District Attorney Steve Wagstaffe told San Francisco's KPIX-TV that Eric Slighton, 53, would not be charged for allegedly posing as a TSA agent and giving at least two women pat-downs in July. Wagstaffe explained that while the allegations may sound vile, authorities have been unable to identify the two victims, giving the DA no case to pursue. The DA also stands behind his assertion that, somehow, impersonating a TSA agent is not illegal.

How can that be?

The small Minnesota town of Cormorant has elected its first mayor. He's technically only 7 years old, and that's not even the weird part: He's also a dog.

Duke the Great Pyrenees, who's 49 in dog years, defeated his human opponent, local store-owner Richard Sherbrook, in something of a landslide -- if you could really call it that; Cormorant only has 12 residents, reports Fargo, North Dakota's WDAY-TV.

So of course this canine mayor "begs" the question: Is it even legal to elect an animal?

What is art?

An exhibit by Chinese artist Cal Guo-Qiang planned for this weekend's opening of the new Aspen Art Museum that features tortoises with iPads mounted to the animals' shells is being called animal abuse by some. More than 2,000 people having already signed an online petition objecting to the exhibit, reports the The Denver Post.

Is the exhibit art, or is it animal abuse?

In order to become a naturalized U.S. citizen, many immigrants will have to prove their knowledge of U.S. history and government by answering anywhere between 10 and 100 questions on civics. Many natural-born Americans may believe this test is a breeze -- though their grades in high school civics class may beg to differ.

According to the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, 91 percent of applicants as of March 2014 actually do pass the naturalization test. Do you think you can pass it?

Here are 10 citizenship questions to test yourself:

A Massachusetts couple is petitioning the court to legally change their middle names -- which would be nothing out of the ordinary if their proposed new middle names weren't both "Seamonster."

Holyoke resident Melanie Convery describes herself and her husband Neal Coughlin as "pretty private" on Twitter. But they're the talk of the town, thanks to the required legal notice of their petition to change their names in the local paper, reports The Republican.

Can the couple really legally change their middle names to Seamonster?

The CIA cafeteria is a strange mix of beef stroganoff and secrets. But some of that incredibly valuable information has been leaked ... sort of.

No it wasn't a double agent, some loose-lipped informant, or even Edward Snowden. Rather, this juicy cafeteria info came after a regular ol' Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request: from a government agency, care of a government information protocol.

So, thanks to a website called Muckrock, we present to you seven of the most pressing issues facing America ... if you eat at the CIA's cafeteria, that is: