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Video of a Tennessee man breaking into joyous dancing after making his last alimony payment to his former spouse has generated over 400,000 views since being uploaded to YouTube.

Memphis resident Ed Smith marked the occasion of making his final spousal support payment to his former wife at a local bank with an array of dance moves all caught on video, reports the New York Daily News.

Why was Smith so excited about making his final payment?

A New York hotel is being sued in federal court for allegedly losing one couple's beloved 2-year-old cat.

Jeffrey and Shoshanah Johnson stayed at the Residence Inn by Marriott in Central Islip with their cat Cotton back in July. According to their suit, Cotton went missing from their room and was later recovered by another guest. What followed is a dizzying chain of allegations concerning Cotton's custody, with Cotton's present location still a mystery.

Do the Johnsons have any kind of a legal case against the hotel for Cotton's disappearance?

A Michigan woman who filed suit against Starbucks after the company stopped making single-serve coffee discs for her brand of coffee maker has settled her lawsuit.

How much was the woman able to get out of Starbucks and Kraft Foods, the maker of her Tassimo coffee maker, after two-and-a half-years of litigation? $250, reports The Grand Rapids Press.

What led to this slow-brewed settlement and why might this it end up costing Starbucks a lot more than $250 when all is said and done?

A Texas school district police officer may be getting the boot after being accused of asking a woman to let him lick her feet in exchange for not taking her to jail.

A woman says she wasn't breaking any traffic laws when was pulled by Cy-Fair Independent School District officer Patrick Quinn in August, reports KTRK-TV. Quinn placed the woman the back of his patrol vehicle after saying he smelled marijuana in the car, which the woman denies. After searching her car, Quinn told the woman he had found drug paraphernalia, which the woman also denies is true.

But if that sounds bad, what the woman says Quinn did next is even worse.

A district court in Pennsylvania is apparently fed up with underdressed court visitors and money pulled from places the sun don't shine.

A pair of signs recently posted in York County District Court Judge Ronald J. Haskell Jr.'s courtroom made the court's feelings on the matter clear, reports The York Daily Record. One sign reads, in Spanish we well as English "Money from undergarments will not be accepted in this office." The other sign, taped just below the first, cautions in all capital letters "PAJAMAS ARE NOT APPROPRIATE ATTIRE FOR DISTRICT COURT."

In light of the judge's all-caps admonition, what would be appropriate attire for court?

The author of a book called "Creative Screwing" claims that her publisher not-so-creatively screwed her out of royalties.

Nannette Laree Hernandez of Berrien Springs, Michigan -- whose 1993 book "Creative Screwing: A Woman's Guide to Becoming an Erotic Enchantress of Superlustful Sex" was revised in 2011 -- claims that her contract with Spero Publishing includes 20 percent royalties on print copies of the book and 50 percent royalties on electronic copies, reports Courthouse News Service.

According to her lawsuit, however, despite reportedly selling 40,000 copies of the book on Amazon.com, Hernandez has only been paid $20.85 in royalties since distribution of the revised version of her book began in 2011.

Kansas' governor is preparing to sign a proclamation declaring October to be "Zombie Preparedness Month." But unless he knows something we don't, there have been no reports of zombie activity in the Midwest.

But this hasn't deterred Kansas' Division of Emergency Management from craving brains publicity for its newest initiative. "If you're prepared for zombies, you're prepared for anything," rings the theme of Zombie Preparedness Month. State emergency officials hope that this will prepare Kansas residents from the more likely event of tornadoes, severe storms, and fires.

So how exactly did zombies get involved?

An Arizona man who was the victim of statutory rape in his teens is now being ordered to pay child support for the daughter conceived during the illicit encounter.

Nick Olivas claims he never knew about the daughter he fathered when he was 14 with an adult woman until he was served with child support papers two years ago, reports The Arizona Republic.

How can Olivas be liable for child support for a child he fathered when he was legally raped?

A strange case of a man impersonating a TSA agent and giving "screenings" at San Francisco International Airport turned even stranger when prosecutors decided not to file charges against him.

San Mateo County District Attorney Steve Wagstaffe told San Francisco's KPIX-TV that Eric Slighton, 53, would not be charged for allegedly posing as a TSA agent and giving at least two women pat-downs in July. Wagstaffe explained that while the allegations may sound vile, authorities have been unable to identify the two victims, giving the DA no case to pursue. The DA also stands behind his assertion that, somehow, impersonating a TSA agent is not illegal.

How can that be?

The small Minnesota town of Cormorant has elected its first mayor. He's technically only 7 years old, and that's not even the weird part: He's also a dog.

Duke the Great Pyrenees, who's 49 in dog years, defeated his human opponent, local store-owner Richard Sherbrook, in something of a landslide -- if you could really call it that; Cormorant only has 12 residents, reports Fargo, North Dakota's WDAY-TV.

So of course this canine mayor "begs" the question: Is it even legal to elect an animal?