Legal Grounds: weird news Archives
Legal Grounds - The FindLaw Legal News with an Attitude Blog

Recently in weird news Category

The manufacturers of Comfyballs underwear say that they were denied trademark by the U.S. Patent and Trademark office because the name of their brand is too "vulgar."

Comfyballs is a Norwegian underwear company established in 2013, reports The Telegraph. The company's underwear is designed to reduce heat and restrict movement of a man's testicles as he goes about his daily business. In other words: The company's product purports to live up to the company's name.

What prompted the USPTO to deny Comfyballs' application to register the company name as a trademark?

A senior New Mexico woman is fighting to get back to playing bingo in her local bingo hall, even attempting to enlist the help of New Mexico's attorney general.

Evangeline Shelland, 70, was barred from playing bingo at the Fraternal Order of Eagles club in Alamogordo, New Mexico, nearly two years ago. According to Albuquerque's KRQE-TV, Shelland has spent most of that time fighting tooth and nail to play at the venue she's attended since 1985.

What is legally keeping Shelland from her passion for bingo?

A New York couple made the most of their subway ride on Friday by getting married on the train.

The unorthodox wedding occurred aboard an N-line train traveling from Brooklyn to Manhattan, where Hector Irakliotis, 26, and Tatyana Sandler, 25, tied the knot in front of friends and random commuters. According to the New York Daily News, the train held a special significance for the couple as the backdrop of much of their romantic history.

Can couples actually be married on a subway train?

A naked man fell through the ceiling of a women's bathroom at Boston's Logan Airport on Saturday before allegedly assaulting an elderly man.

The man was identified by police as 26-year-old Boston resident Cameron Shenk, reports The Associated Press. Charges against Shenk for his puzzling airport rampage include attempted murder, mayhem, assault and battery on a police officer, and lewd and lascivious conduct.

How did a naked man end up in the ceiling of the Logan Airport's women's restroom?

Video of a Tennessee man breaking into joyous dancing after making his last alimony payment to his former spouse has generated over 400,000 views since being uploaded to YouTube.

Memphis resident Ed Smith marked the occasion of making his final spousal support payment to his former wife at a local bank with an array of dance moves all caught on video, reports the New York Daily News.

Why was Smith so excited about making his final payment?

A New York hotel is being sued in federal court for allegedly losing one couple's beloved 2-year-old cat.

Jeffrey and Shoshanah Johnson stayed at the Residence Inn by Marriott in Central Islip with their cat Cotton back in July. According to their suit, Cotton went missing from their room and was later recovered by another guest. What followed is a dizzying chain of allegations concerning Cotton's custody, with Cotton's present location still a mystery.

Do the Johnsons have any kind of a legal case against the hotel for Cotton's disappearance?

A Michigan woman who filed suit against Starbucks after the company stopped making single-serve coffee discs for her brand of coffee maker has settled her lawsuit.

How much was the woman able to get out of Starbucks and Kraft Foods, the maker of her Tassimo coffee maker, after two-and-a half-years of litigation? $250, reports The Grand Rapids Press.

What led to this slow-brewed settlement and why might this it end up costing Starbucks a lot more than $250 when all is said and done?

A Texas school district police officer may be getting the boot after being accused of asking a woman to let him lick her feet in exchange for not taking her to jail.

A woman says she wasn't breaking any traffic laws when was pulled by Cy-Fair Independent School District officer Patrick Quinn in August, reports KTRK-TV. Quinn placed the woman the back of his patrol vehicle after saying he smelled marijuana in the car, which the woman denies. After searching her car, Quinn told the woman he had found drug paraphernalia, which the woman also denies is true.

But if that sounds bad, what the woman says Quinn did next is even worse.

A district court in Pennsylvania is apparently fed up with underdressed court visitors and money pulled from places the sun don't shine.

A pair of signs recently posted in York County District Court Judge Ronald J. Haskell Jr.'s courtroom made the court's feelings on the matter clear, reports The York Daily Record. One sign reads, in Spanish we well as English "Money from undergarments will not be accepted in this office." The other sign, taped just below the first, cautions in all capital letters "PAJAMAS ARE NOT APPROPRIATE ATTIRE FOR DISTRICT COURT."

In light of the judge's all-caps admonition, what would be appropriate attire for court?

The author of a book called "Creative Screwing" claims that her publisher not-so-creatively screwed her out of royalties.

Nannette Laree Hernandez of Berrien Springs, Michigan -- whose 1993 book "Creative Screwing: A Woman's Guide to Becoming an Erotic Enchantress of Superlustful Sex" was revised in 2011 -- claims that her contract with Spero Publishing includes 20 percent royalties on print copies of the book and 50 percent royalties on electronic copies, reports Courthouse News Service.

According to her lawsuit, however, despite reportedly selling 40,000 copies of the book on Amazon.com, Hernandez has only been paid $20.85 in royalties since distribution of the revised version of her book began in 2011.