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You know that feeling -- you're eight years old and craving that McDonald's cheeseburger, and you're four-year-old sister wants one too, but your parents are asleep and can't get you to the drive thru. Now, some of us might've just suffered with our hunger pangs, or tried to cobble together some cheeseburger substitute. But that's only because we lacked the ambition of one Ohio boy, who hopped into the family van with his baby sister and headed for the Golden Arches.

And they might've gotten away with it too, if it weren't for those meddling adults, who called the cops on our young heroes. But not before they got their tiny, toddler hands on those sweet, sweet cheeseburgers.

Harrisburg High School's new principal wanted to get the attention of students who were skipping class and their parents. "Many parents send their kids to school and they're thinking they're going to class," Lisa Love told the Patriot-News. "I needed to reach out because of the enormous number not going to class." The school therefore sent suspension notices to 500 of its 1,100 students last week, punishing kids for not going to class by not allowing them to attend class.

While this may seem an odd punishment, it was designed as part of a larger effort by the Pennsylvania school to improve test scores, a plan school officials intended to present to parents and the news media had not a fire alarm been pulled during that presentation.

Harrisburg High's Lean on Me-esque efforts got us thinking about some other crazy high school legal stories, so here are some of our favorites, from our archives:

"It's outrageous," defense attorney Sherry Tash told the Kennebec Journal. "He is one of the people who's supposed to protect the sanctity of the courtroom, and he goes and does this."

The "he" to whom Tash is referring is Sgt. Joel Eldridge of the Kennebec County Sheriff's Office. And the "this" to which she is referring is a photo Eldridge snapped of Tash's notes, which he then allegedly sent to Assistant District Attorney Francis Griffin while Griffin and Tash were conferring with a judge in chambers.

No, it's not illegal, but it is a major breach of legal ethics and courtroom protocol.

"My client was the victim of a bug in an application. The bug has caused him problems in his private life." While probably true, these are most likely not the words that are going to save your marriage. Also generally not a winning legal argument, but you can always try.

Those are the words of one man's lawyer, after his client's wife kept getting Uber alerts on her phone about his whereabouts. Apparently she was less than pleased with those whereabouts, and the two have divorced. Now he's suing Uber for almost $50 million over the glitch.

One of the drawbacks for filing for patents is that those patents, when issued, become public documents. And for a company as secretive as Apple, that means a whole lot of people getting glimpses of your new tech and then guessing what it could be used for.

So when the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office published a patent application from Apple for what appears to be vaporizer technology, the natural speculation was that the tech company was trying to cash in on booming cannabusiness. But is Apple really trying to make a pot-friendly iPhone? Or an air freshener?

We've all been there before -- with an ex that makes you so miserable, it has to be a crime, right? Or at least a violation of the state constitution? Well, brave Iowan Tim Le finally had the courage to bring that claim to court, and his claim was roundly rejected.

So what was Tim's ex doing that was unconstitutionally awful?

When you're drunk, you're already not thinking clearly. And if you're trying to drive drunk, you're really making some bad life choices.

The combo of drinking and driving often produces some comedic results (as long as everyone involved is uninjured), including intoxicated people operating some weird vehicles to concocting some odd excuses for driving drunk. And these are three of the funniest DUI arrests in the past few months:

Whether you'll get pinched for puttering around drunk in a wheelchair may depend on where you're operating and whether the court considers you a pedestrian. In Ohio, for example, you can absolutely get a DUI in a wheelchair. But in Oregon, you might be considered a pedestrian if you slam your motorized wheelchair into the side of a truck while crossing the street, and thus, no DUI.

Such was the case of one James Richard Greene of Lincoln County ...

If the thought of posing for the DMV without your "spiritual antenna" scares you more than walking around in public naked, we have some welcome news out of Millinocket, Maine. Goat horns are now considered religious attire, and, as long as they don't obscure your face, you're free to wear them when you get your driver's license photo snapped.

"Many practicing Pagans are afraid of being public," Phelan Moonsong told the Washington Post, "but when they see my horns it reminds them it's okay to be yourself." Now, anyone who checks his driver's license will get the same reminder.

Santa Claus must be ahead of schedule this holiday season as he helped effect a raid on a drug cartel in Lima, Peru this week. Normally, those on Santa's naughty list either don't get any presents at all, or maybe get a lump of coal. However, this Santa had a different plan.

Video shows an undercover officer dressed as Santa wielding a sledge-hammer to bash in a front door and make several arrests. Apparently, Santa's gift bag held the massive hammer along with his colleagues' guns. As a result of the raid, four men were arrested and 4,500 cocaine wraps were discovered. Peru is known as the world's largest producer of cocaine.