Legally Weird - FindLaw Legal Curiosities Blog

Legally Weird - The FindLaw Legal Curiosities Blog


Are you trying to sell a murder house, but finding it hard to keep its homicidal history a secret? Well in Pennsylvania, you needn't worry about things like that. The Pennsylvania Supreme Court has ruled that homeowners have no duty to disclose such tragic incidents to potential buyers.

According to PennLive.com, the state's High Court ruled this week that the sale of a house that was the backdrop of a murder-suicide didn't require the owner to tell the buyers about it.

So why are Pennsylvania homeowners allowed to keep murders and other tragedies secret from potential buyers?

An Ohio vet's unconventional form of therapy is ruffling some legal feathers: He's been cited for owning therapy ducks.

Iraq veteran Darin Welker of West Lafayette is facing a minor misdemeanor for owning 14 ducks, despite the fact that he claims they are therapeutic for his PTSD and back injury. The Marion Star reports that while the Department of Veteran's Affairs (VA) was willing to pay for Welker's back surgery, it didn't cover any physical or emotional therapy.

So what legal quack said it's wrong for Welker to keep his therapy ducks?

Anyone who has rented out their house or apartment through online home-sharing service Airbnb has probably asked themselves, at least rhetorically, what's the worst that could happen?

Well, a San Francisco woman's experience with an unruly Airbnb tenant in her Palm Springs condo is illustrating the dark side of the burgeoning sharing economy. According to the San Francisco Chronicle, the Airbnb tenant stopped paying rent 30 days into his stay, but now refuses to leave and is using California's tenant's rights rules to remain in the woman's condo rent-free.

What led to this woman's nightmare scenario, and why has it been so difficult to get this Airbnb squatter to leave?

Imprisoned ex-dictator Manuel Noriega is suing the makers of "Call of Duty: Black Ops II" for allegedly harming his reputation and using his name and likeness without permission.

The Activision Blizzard Inc. game, which has made more than $1 billion in worldwide sales, includes a mission in which the protagonists must track down Noriega and capture him, reports Gamespot. Noriega's lawsuit claims the game portrays him as a "kidnapper, murderer, and enemy of the state" and used that virtual vilification to profit.

Does Noriega have a case against his fictional portrayal in a video game?

A shoplifter who broke his ankle while getting arrested was awarded $510,000 by a jury this week for his injury.

Even more noteworthy: This is actually the third time the man, 50-year-old Kevin Jarman, has gotten a payout from New York City in a case against the New York Police Department. Two previous court cases were settled before trial for $15,000 and $20,000, according to The New York Post.

What earned Jarman his biggest payout yet, and how do you go about suing the police in court?

Disneyland's 59th Anniversary is today, which makes it a great time to reflect on all the joy (and pain) Disney has brought its fans.

From injury suits to employee beard bans, the company has enjoyed a wide range of legal issues from its employees, intellectual properties, and customers.

It really is a small legal world of Disney, but these 10 legally weird Disney incidents capture the magic of the iconic company:

A Connecticut man was arrested after police say he stabbed a watermelon with a butcher knife in a "passive aggressive" manner.

Carmine Cervillino, 49, of Thomaston, was picked up by police after his wife claimed he left the watermelon, pierced by a large butcher knife, on the kitchen counter to "intimidate her because he is angry at her," The Register-Citizen reports.

What did the woman do to draw Cervillino's watermelon-stabbing ire, and what charges is this allegedly passive-aggressive fruit slayer now facing?

After a landmark U.S. Supreme Court ruling on the issue of prayers at public meetings, the town of Greece, New York, is awaiting an atheist's secular invocation at its town board meeting tonight.

The Supreme Court determined in Town of Greece v. Galloway that sectarian prayers before town hall meetings were constitutional, even if the lion's share of the invocations were distinctly Christian. Key to the High Court's decision was the fact that anyone was allowed to open a town hall meeting, even those of non-Christian faiths.

Now it appears an atheist is preparing to test this ruling.

In celebration of National Nude Day today -- not to mention Nude Recreation Week -- Legally Weird is letting it all hang out.

We're going to show you the family crown jewels in our naked and nude archive, and show that while nudity may not be shameful, it can leave you legally exposed.

Check out our Top 10 real-life legal notes for nudists before you strip down:

A 9-year-old Minnesota girl fed up with her parents' alleged use and sale of marijuana in their home decided to take action.

She walked into the Barnesville police station last month and gave detailed descriptions to police about where to find her parents' stash of meth, as well as seven marijuana plants, reports ABC News.

What was the final straw for this little girl, and what charges could her parents potentially be facing as a result?