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'Viral' Lamborghini Poop Prank Ends in Taser Attack

A staged stunt by a pair of YouTube pranksters involving a pile of fake feces and a stranger's Lamborghini went wrong (or perhaps right) when the stranger turned out to be armed with a Taser.

The so-called "Viral Brothers" Erik Meldik and Cenek Styblo are YouTube stars from the Czech Republic visiting the United States. They've been filming short prank videos that typically involve an unsuspecting victim tricked into reacting on camera.

In this case, however, the Brothers' prank got a somewhat shocking reaction.

'Poop Prank' Goes Virally Wrong(?)

In their set-up for the video prank, the brothers explain that a man in Lamborghini cut them off in traffic. After following the man to a parking lot, the pair decide to plant a piece of plastic poop on the car with Styblo squatting over it to make it appear freshly extruded.

When the car's driver reappears, he is unsurprisingly upset at the desecration of his fine automobile. Reaching in his pocket, the driver pulls out a stun gun and fires it at the fleeing Styblo, sending him crashing to the ground. Although Styblo screams in pain, a follow up video shows that he was not seriously hurt, reports UPI.

You can see the prank video here (warning: foul language):

The driver's reaction may be somewhat understandable -- though some are wondering if the guy was in on the prank the whole time.

But for our purposes, let's focus on one of the legal questions raised by the video: Was it legal to bust out a Taser and fire it at a (supposed) stranger?

Taser Laws Vary by State

As Taser International Inc. explains, the laws for possession and use of Tasers and other stun guns vary widely by state. However, in a majority of states, consumers can possess Tasers and other stun guns without having to obtain a special permit.

Improper use of a Taser can lead to criminal charges and, in some cases, enhanced criminal penalties. In California, for example, the use of a stun gun to commit an assault can result in up to three years of imprisonment. Although the driver could claim self-defense if charged with assault, he would likely have to show that he was in fear of physical violence, as opposed to just being provoked by the prank.

In this case, however, it doesn't appear that Styblo plans on pressing any charges. In fact, with the YouTube video of the incident at almost 5 million views, he might consider sending the man a thank-you card.

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