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They were two great tastes that went great together: Kwan Dixon's Pop's Popcorn and Koosier Daddy's Food Cart filled that niche of the one-stop-shop to get your hot dogs, nachos, and sex toys. But alas, as Robert Frost warned us, nothing gold can stay. And the city of Evansville, Illinois shut down the most magical food cart in all the land.

So how come Kwan was forced to close up shop?

Cops OK Distribution of Banned Book in Idaho Park

Last year parents in Meridian, Idaho moved to ban a popular novel from local schools for its allegedly sexually explicit and anti-Christian content. The book is Sherman Alexie's young adult tale, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, winner of the 2007 National Book Award for Young People's Literature.

Brady Kissel, a local high school student, fought back against the ban, circulating a petition that earned 350 signatures and the ire of the offended parents. This week Kissel was out in the park distributing copies of the books when those angry parents called the cops, reports the Free Thought Project.

Festivus Pole in Oklahoma State Capitol Approved

Festivus is a fictional holiday invented by a character on the sitcom Seinfeld about 20 years ago. But it will be recognized by the state of Oklahoma and others this month, according to the Associated Press.

A Festivus pole wrapped in the rainbow colors of gay pride and topped with a disco ball will be on display in the Oklahoma Capitol rotunda, right by a giant nutcracker and a sleigh with gifts. Approval for the pole came just months after the Supreme Court ruled that permanent Ten Commandments tributes or displays in the Capitol violated the requirement for separation of church and state. But Festivus is not a religious holiday.

Albany Political Corruption Museum Puts Renewable Resources to Use

Albany New York is accustomed to shady characters. It is New York's capital and many who came to it with high hopes after elections left in disgrace after corruption trials. Now former State Assemblyman Sheldon Silver joins those ranks and the time is right to announce Albany's Museum of Political Corruption.

The museum is the brainchild of Bruce Roter, a professor at Albany's College of Saint Rose. He is raising money for the museum, which he envisions as both an educational institution and a tourist destination that focuses on the city's reputation for corruption, according to the Associated Press.

Hair is serious business. When schools start regulating students' hair styles, they should tread carefully or risk receiving a federal civil rights complaint.

Late last year, five-year-old Jalyn Broussard happily went to school with a new haircut. His new style was innocent enough. He had a "fade" which was short on the sides and longer on the top. According to his school, this haircut was a distraction to other students, so they sent him home.

Now, Jalyn is represented by the Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights, a legal advocacy group. The group has just filed a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education alleging racial discrimination in violation of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act.

A Noah's Ark-themed amusement park may have sprung a financial leak after being denied millions of dollars in tax incentives.

The Ark Encounter, a Genesis-themed attraction with a 500-foot-long wooden replica of Noah's Ark, was denied approximately $18 million in tax breaks from the state of Kentucky. Why? According to Think Progress, it may have something to do with refusing to comply with the state's existing nondiscrimination policies.

Why is the state giving the Ark park more than two of every legal problem?

The Satanic Temple has won another legal battle, this time in Florida. The Florida Department of Management Services agreed to allow a diorama featuring Lucifer in the Capitol's rotunda.

Looking like a cross between a last-minute history fair project and a black velvet puppeteer's booth, the Satanic Temple's display reads "Happy Holidays From The Satanic Temple" and features a tiny angel figurine tumbling from cotton-ball clouds into construction-paper fire. According to the Orlando Sentinel, this same diorama was rejected one year ago for being "grossly offensive."

What the devil is up with this Satanic diorama?

Married couples can often drive each other crazy, but this married couple won't be legally driving anywhere in Florida.

Daniel and Scott Wall-DeSousa were married in New York last December and had their names legally changed to a hyphenated form of their original surnames. But, as the Orlando Sentinel reports, when the Palm Bay, Florida, couple obtained drivers' licenses with their new married names, the Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles canceled them.

Why won't Florida let these married gays drive?

Ohio to Pay for Crime Victim's Dentures After Court Battle

A man who claims he lost his dentures after being attacked and beaten unconscious in 2011 is getting a new set on the State of Ohio's dime.

The decision, reached yesterday by the Court of Claims of Ohio, came after Ohio's attorney general rejected Jeffrey Childers' original claim for reparations, citing lack of documentation reports The Plain Dealer.

How did Childers manage to finally get his "teeth" back?

A South Carolina boy and his mother are suing the state's DMV over his right to wear his "everyday" makeup in his driver's license photo.

Teresa Culpepper has sued the state and local directors of South Carolina's Department of Motor Vehicles after her 16-year-old son was refused a driver's license photo in June while wearing foundation, mascara, eye shadow, and lip gloss, reports Courthouse News Service.

Can South Carolina's DMV legally tell a boy to take off his mascara for a license photo?