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World Trade Center BASE Jumpers Face Burglary Charges

A World Trade Center BASE jump has landed four men in legal trouble. Three skydiving enthusiasts and their alleged accomplice have been arrested on burglary and reckless endangerment charges for a daring parachute jump in September.

Marko Markovich, 27; Andrew Rossig, 33; and James Brady, 32, are professional BASE jumpers -- standing for "building, antenna, span, earth" -- who set their sights on the rebuilt World Trade Center, the tallest building in the United States, The Associated Press reports. Alleged accomplice Kyle Hartwell, 29, stood watch from the ground.

But how is BASE jumping from atop 1 World Trade Center -- informally known as the Freedom Tower -- considered burglary?

Lawmakers in Hawaii are debating an exemption that currently allows undercover cops to have sex with prostitutes... during their official, professional investigations, of course.

The law has received criticism from human trafficking experts, worried that it can unnecessarily "victimize sex workers," reports The Associated Press. Many in law enforcement, however, argue that they need the legal protection to literally catch prostitutes in the act.

So is it time to say "aloha" (as in "goodbye," not hello) to sex with prostitutes?

Looking to spend your Spring Break with your good friend Mary Jane? Well, we don't mean to harsh your mellow, but there might be some pesky pot laws you need to keep in mind -- even in the two states where it's now legal (under state law, anyway).

Pot tourists, don't leave for your green Spring Break without reading these five legal tips:

Penis Tattoo 'Sext' Message Appeal: Court Sides With Sender

If you're a Georgia man who loves to sext pictures of your penis tattoo, rejoice. The Georgia Supreme Court has sided with a man who sexted a picture of his tattooed penis to a lady who wasn't at all impressed.

According to the court, Charles Leo Warren III should not have been charged under a criminal indecency law when he sexted an image of his tattooed penis, UPI reports. Warren's genital tattoo reads: "STRONG E nuf 4 A MAN BUT Made 4 A WOMAN."

Why did the court side with Warren and his unsolicited sext message? Three numbers: 16-12-81.

Unreturned VHS Rental Gets Woman Arrested 9 Years Later

A South Carolina woman has been arrested for never returning a VHS rental. If you're wondering who in the world still watches VHS tapes, rest assured, the rental was from 2005 -- the year of "Hollaback Girl," "Capote," the death of Pope John Paul II, and Hurricane Katrina.

Kayla Michelle Finley, 27, of Pickens County, is facing a misdemeanor charge of "failure to return a rented video cassette," CNN reports.

The real crime: It was a Jennifer Lopez movie.

An Indiana man arrested for being "drunk and annoying" scored a victory on Thursday when a state appellate court overturned his public intoxication conviction.

The Indiana Court of Appeals found that Rodregus Morgan was arrested under a state law that was unconstitutionally vague about just how "annoying" a drunk person could be, Indianapolis' WRTV reported.

What about Indiana's public intoxication law was so annoying to the appellate court?

Hustler Club's Lap Dances Too Sexy to Be Tax-Exempt: N.Y. Judge

Are the Hustler Club's lap dances a tax-deductible art form? A New York City judge sure doesn't see it that way, and has ordered the club to pay more than two years' worth of back taxes.

New York State Division of Tax Appeals Judge Donna Gardiner ruled that even if the exotic dancing itself is artistic, it's "ancillary" to the Hustler Club's real business -- to sell a "sexual fantasy," the New York Daily News reports. Unfortunately for the club's owners, such fantasy dances are "insufficiently 'cultural and artistic'" to be tax-exempt, Gardiner explained.

So how much does the Hustler Club owe Uncle Sam?

Driver's Google Glass Ticket Dismissed; Judge Sees No Proof

At long last, the California woman who received the first-ever traffic ticket for wearing Google Glass while driving is free to once again snap on her high-tech gear. The officer who ticketed her, however, may want to Google the question "What is evidence?"

As we previously suspected, the citation was dismissed for evidentiary reasons. The San Diego traffic court commissioner found insufficient proof that Cecilia Abadie was using her Google Glass while driving. It was a good day for Abadie because her speeding ticket was also tossed because of a lack of proof, reports The San Diego Union-Tribune.

But the legal status of sporting Google Glass behind the wheel is more unsettled than meets the eye.

Bill Aims to Let Kids Chew Pop Tarts Into Guns

Thanks to a new bill, children in Oklahoma may soon be able to chew Pop-Tarts into the shape of guns without getting arrested. The goal is to rein in outlandish zero tolerance policies.

Here's hoping things don't take a turn for the "Lord of the Flies" during snack time.

As Colo. Pot Sales Top $5M, Bank Accounts Still a Problem

The bud business is booming in Colorado, the first state to legalize retail recreational marijuana sales to adults age 21 and older. In the first week of sales alone, pot retailers raked in more than $5 million. Combined wholesale and retail pot sales are expected to generate a jaw-dropping $600 million annually.

But here's the kicker: The businesses can't open bank accounts. The issue would make for the most bureaucratically frustrating episode of "Weeds."