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Is it Illegal to Own a Fox?

Most people are dog or cat people, but some people want something a little more exotic, like a oh, we don't know, a monkey, or a parrot, or hey, how about a fox?

Is it legal to own a fox as a pet?

"I'm going to cut your hair, give you an atomic wedgie, and steal your lunch money! Haha. JK. Smiley face. Smiley face." Did the "JK" and smiley faces make the comment less of a threat?

California judges don't think so. A threat is a threat regardless of smiling emojis.

All those protestors against Indiana's new Religious Freedom Restoration Act can put this news in their pipe and smoke it: the IRS has granted tax exempt status to the First Church of Cannabis.

The church had already been recognized as a religious corporation by the state of Indiana and plans its first services for July 1, the day the state's RFRA goes into effect. So will the new law protect toking up in a state that currently bans all marijuana possession and use?

A powdered alcohol drink mix going by the name of Palcohol has been approved for sale in the United States, but at least one senator is trying to rain on the powdered booze parade.

So how close are you to getting your hands on a pouch of Powderita? Let's take a look at the law as it currently stands:

To 'Pray' for Strippers, Wash. Man Wants Names, Addresses, Pics

A Washington man insists he only wants to pray for strippers, not prey on them.

Still, a legal battle is unfolding over David Van Vleet's public records request for the names and addresses of as many as 125 exotic dancers. In Washington state, showgirls are required to get a $75-a-year license, which lists the applicant's name, date of birth, address, a full-color photo, and other identifying information, reports The Huffington Post. And Van Vleet says that he needs those full names and addresses in order to pray for them by name.

As public records, with no provision in the law to protect the strippers' privacy, the applications would seem to be open to any inquisitive individual with a taste for salvation. But the dancers, and a strip club manager, have taken action to block the request.

Guy Pulls Over Deputy for Illegal Unmarked Cop Car. Was He Right?

This is backwards. This is really backwards.

Last week, "Liberty Speaker" Gav Seim posted a video of himself pulling over an unmarked patrol car. In the video (embedded below), the activist lectures the visibly annoyed sheriff's deputy on the illegality of unmarked police cars, asks to see his identification, tells him that he could be arrested for going on patrol in an unmarked car, and eventually lets him off with a warning.

It'd be hilarious if the activist wasn't so smug (anyone who says, "We the people are sentinels of our liberty" can't be taken too seriously). But more importantly, does he have a point?

The expansion of religious liberties under the Supreme Court's recent Hobby Lobby ruling has found a new home with Satanists, who are hoping to use the decision to defeat certain abortion laws.

The Satanic Temple (TST) believes that the human body is "inviolable subject to one's own will alone," reports The Huffington Post. TST has begun a campaign to defeat abortion laws that require a woman to read informational materials which critics claim are designed to dissuade a woman from terminating her pregnancy. And the Temple is using the recent Hobby Lobby case to do it.

Are these Satanists unholier than thou? Or will the law give the Devil his due?

As Colorado has been selling legal pot to the general public for more than six months now, a new government study has found that residents and visitors alike are smoking tons of pot.

Not figurative tons. Actual metric tons. According to The Associated Press, the Centennial State's market demand for legal weed is about 130 metric tons a year. And most of that demand is coming from residents, not tourists.

So how does Colorado's craving for cannabis add up?

N.Y. May Ban 'Tiger Selfies' Trending on Tinder, Dating Sites

A bill passed by New York legislators seeks to outlaw so-called "tiger selfies" increasingly popping up on dating sites such as Tinder.

The bill actually wasn't drafted with these photos in mind. In fact, the bill's author, New York State Assemblywoman Linda Rosenthal, hadn't even heard of the "tiger selfie" trend until after her bill was passed, reports CNET.

What are tiger selfies, and how would they be affected by this proposed law which awaits the governor's signature?

Florida has proved that it won't be falling behind the times by enacting a law that prohibits schools from punishing children who chew Pop-Tarts into simulated guns.

Florida Gov. Rick Scott on Friday signed the "Pop-Tart" bill that was spurred by a 7-year-old's suspension for chewing his toaster pastry into a shape that resembled a gun. The new law purports to prevent children from being unreasonably disciplined for these sorts of breakfast-food hijinks, which are apparently a problem in Florida.

What exactly does this new Pop-Tart gun law say?