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A Texas sheriff's deputy is facing some charges of his own after allegedly tricking sex offenders into posing for nude photographs.

One man recently released from prison reported that when he went to register as a sex offender with the Wise County Sheriff's Office, Deputy Chad Hightower informed him of a new state law that required all sex offenders to be photographed in the nude. The deputy took the man into a bathroom, where he stripped naked and had photographs taken from all sides, reports the Wise County Messenger.

As you might have guessed, there is no such law. Don't worry, though: The story gets way worse.

The NYPD is getting schooled on Twitter... literally. As part of a "Twitter School" program that began in May, the New York Police Department's top brass have been attending classes on how to be smarter on social media.

NYPD commanders are being educated on the tough questions like "What is Twitter?" and whether or not to help out that Nigerian prince who keeps bugging everyone. The Wall Street Journal reports that the NYPD's Twitter School classes are aimed at increasing the positive power of social media for the Department and avoiding its obvious pitfalls.

But does the NYPD really need to send its officers to Twitter School?

When Ashley Turnbull gave her five-year-old son, Phoenix, baby chickens and ducks for his birthday earlier this year, she wasn't aware they were against the law. But that was no reason for Police Chief Trevor Berger to come onto her property and decapitate a small red hen with a shovel, she said.

The chief of police for Atwater, Minnesota said he was merely enforcing the city's ordinance prohibiting keeping fowl. He told the West Central Tribune he was responding to neighbors' complaints, including one that the chickens were on the loose, which led him to Turnbull's house on that fateful August 16 day. No one disputes that Berger told Turnbull she had until August 7 to get rid of her three chickens and two ducks.

Was this avian atrocity allowable by law?

A Maserati Gran Turismo is the kind of car that's guaranteed to get attention.

A Maserati Gran Turismo painted to look like one of the robots from the 'Transformers' movie series is guaranteed to get even more attention. Unfortunately, for one Massachusetts residents, this attention included being cited for impersonating a police officer, reports The Patriot Ledger.

Why is the man's lawyer calling the charges against his client "silly?"

A California man shot with a stun gun by a park ranger after being detained for having his dog off-leash has taken his lawsuit against the United States Government to trial.

Gary Hesterberg brought suit against the government for battery and false imprisonment following a 2012 incident on a San Mateo County running trail managed by the National Park Service, reports Courthouse News Service.

How did Hesterberg's leash-law violation take such a "stunning" turn of events?

A bizarre arrest involving bottled water somehow mistaken for beer has landed one student a $212,500 settlement with the state of Virginia.

Elizabeth Daly, a student at University of Virginia, had gone into purchase a carton of sparkling water in April 2013. What she hadn't counted on was state agents swarming her SUV under the assumption that she had illegally purchased beer, reports The Associated Press.

What was going on in Daly's case, and what led to her significant settlement?

A Seattle police officer has been reassigned after a review of police records found the officer had written 80 percent of the marijuana citations issued in the city so far this year.

The officer even added notes to the back of some of the citations, including one in which he voiced his opinion that Washington's marijuana legalization laws are "silly," reports Reuters.

What else did the department's investigation find? And if pot is legal in Washington state, why are pot smokers still being cited?

Prosecutors in a Virginia sexting case have reportedly obtained a search warrant to take pictures of a teenage boy's erect penis.

Prince William County prosecutors are hoping to use the photos as evidence that the 17-year-old boy's erection is the same one seen in a "sexting" video allegedly sent to his 15-year-old girlfriend, The Washington Post reports.

The story has many wondering: Can police actually do this?

An Indiana woman thought the "Unmarked Police Car" joke bumper sticker she received as a gift was pretty funny.

But Indianapolis police apparently didn't agree. Pamela Konchinsky, 56, was pulled over and claims police demanded she remove the sticker, reports The Indianapolis Star.

Konchinsky is now suing the police officers, alleging they violated her constitutional rights. What's the basis of her lawsuit?

One police department in Maryland is planning to live-tweet a prostitution sting sometime this week. What could possibly go wrong?

The Prince George's County Police Department (PGPD) announced that they will blast the details of an undercover prostitution bust live on Twitter, but the department has been secretive about the details.

Why live-tweet a prostitution sting? And why not?