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Of all the illegal things being bought and sold on Facebook, the last thing that we thought would get you in trouble is ceviche. Leaving aside whether or not purchasing raw fish cured in citrus juices over the internet is a wise decision, surely a single mother of six can offer up a delicious homemade dish on a local Facebook forum, no?

No. Not according to San Joaquin County authorities, who completed a year-long undercover sting operation on illicit Facebook food sales by hauling Mariza Ruelas into court to face misdemeanor charges that could wind up in jail time if Ruelas is convicted. Legitimate law enforcement dragnet, or a criminal fishing expedition gone awry? You decide:

Nearly every new car owner thinks, at least for a moment, about whether to get a vanity plate and what it would say. John Mitchell, a Maryland man, decided he would not only get a vanity plate, he wanted to get one with a Spanish curse word. While he was likely surprised that his requested plate was approved, he used the plate for two years before the DMV even knew what they did.

When the DMV discovered the plate had been issued in error, as vulgar language is not permitted, they cancelled the plate. Mr. Mitchell filed and lost an administrative appeal, then took the matter to the state court and lost, and appealed all the way to the state's supreme court, where he finally lost for the last time.

In the recently filed civil suit in New Mexico against Roosevelt County Sheriff Marlin Parker, the town of Elida's mayor, Durward Dixon, alleges the sheriff challenged him to a fist fight in the middle of the road. Dixon and Parker are at odds over Parker's alleged interference with the Elida police department's enforcement of law and order.

The lawsuit specifically claims that Sheriff Parker returned a dog to its owner after Elida police had taken the dog away for killing chickens. The sheriff returned the dog because he asserted that chickens are not livestock. When Dixon attempted to speak with the county sheriff, Parker refused to discuss the matter on a couple occasions, and on one occasion, according to Dixon, challenged him to a fist fight in the road.

You know how the saying goes: "Give a man a drone, and he'll strap a flamethrower on that bad boy and roast a turkey with it." (Teach a man to drone, and he'll talk turkey for the rest of his life.) And here comes the Federal Aviation Administration, trying to take away your god-given right to flamethrowing-drone-roasted turkey.

But how far does the long arm of the airplane law actually reach? Surely not into our forested backyards, where we should be free to attach any old incendiary device to an unmanned whirlybird and fly that thing all over tarnation.

Inconsistent Law Yields Bizarre Charges for Tutor Dating Teen

In an effort to protect minors, there are numerous laws enacted that criminalize adult interactions with youths, and sometimes these laws are not entirely consistent, creating strange situations. This is illustrated by a recent Houston, Texas case in which a 51-year-old math tutor is being charged for possession of child pornography for having images in his phone of a 17-year-old student with whom he had consensual sexual relations which are not illegal.

Texas law puts the age of consent for sex at 17 but criminalizes possession of lewd images of a child under 18. That means that although the tutor is not being prosecuted for touching his student, who says she willingly submitted and reportedly still wants to see him, he is charged for the photos in his phone and for allegedly cajoling her into sending them.

The National Crime Information Center (NCIC) is an online database of criminal justice information available to law enforcement agencies nationwide. Colorado has its own database, the Colorado Crime Information Center (CCIC). These databases are intended to assist law enforcement officers with criminal investigations.

Instead, some Denver cops were using the NCIC and CCIC to get phone numbers for romantic reasons, and to retrieve and hand out personal information to friends, tow truck drivers, and stalkers. And officers were rarely, if ever, getting punished for it.

Some things get better with age: a fine wine, a great book, this pun about a snickers ad campaign from the '80s. And some things don't age as well: sushi, JNCO jeans, and criminal prosecutions.

Which is why the North Dakota Supreme Court just tossed out a man's DUI conviction that came 20 years after the fact. The only things that should still be around from March of 1995 are re-airings of "Tommy Boy."

One normally doesn't think of the prison population as being especially helpful when it comes to fighting crime. But as one state Department of Corrections official said, "we've got 26,000 felons behind bars, and they know a lot."

So how do you figure out what they know? Here's an idea -- give inmates playing cards featuring cold cases, and then wait for the inmates to solve them.

Smuggler Caught With Turtles Taped to Legs Pleads Guilty

A Canadian man who was caught at the US border with 51 turtles taped to his legs last year, yesterday pled guilty to six smuggling crimes. In a Michigan federal court, Kai Xu, 27, admitted to smuggling or attempting to smuggle 1,000 reptiles in all, according to the Associated Press.

Xu has reportedly been smuggling turtles to China for a while now, and it is a relatively profitable business.

Google's Self-Driving Car Stopped by Police for Slow Driving

A Mountain View Police officer pulled over a Google self-driving care for driving too slowly last week. There was no one in the driver's seat to ticket for the vehicle's sluggish progress through a 35 mile-per-hour zone, according to the police department's blog.

But the cop did question the remote operator, even if he issued no citation. The officer stopped the car and made contact to learn more about how the car was choosing speeds along certain roadways and "to educate the operators about impeding traffic."