Legally Weird: Strange Law Enforcement Archives
Legally Weird - The FindLaw Legal Curiosities Blog

Recently in Strange Law Enforcement Category

A California man shot with a stun gun by a park ranger after being detained for having his dog off-leash has taken his lawsuit against the United States Government to trial.

Gary Hesterberg brought suit against the government for battery and false imprisonment following a 2012 incident on a San Mateo County running trail managed by the National Park Service, reports Courthouse News Service.

How did Hesterberg's leash-law violation take such a "stunning" turn of events?

A bizarre arrest involving bottled water somehow mistaken for beer has landed one student a $212,500 settlement with the state of Virginia.

Elizabeth Daly, a student at University of Virginia, had gone into purchase a carton of sparkling water in April 2013. What she hadn't counted on was state agents swarming her SUV under the assumption that she had illegally purchased beer, reports The Associated Press.

What was going on in Daly's case, and what led to her significant settlement?

A Seattle police officer has been reassigned after a review of police records found the officer had written 80 percent of the marijuana citations issued in the city so far this year.

The officer even added notes to the back of some of the citations, including one in which he voiced his opinion that Washington's marijuana legalization laws are "silly," reports Reuters.

What else did the department's investigation find? And if pot is legal in Washington state, why are pot smokers still being cited?

Prosecutors in a Virginia sexting case have reportedly obtained a search warrant to take pictures of a teenage boy's erect penis.

Prince William County prosecutors are hoping to use the photos as evidence that the 17-year-old boy's erection is the same one seen in a "sexting" video allegedly sent to his 15-year-old girlfriend, The Washington Post reports.

The story has many wondering: Can police actually do this?

An Indiana woman thought the "Unmarked Police Car" joke bumper sticker she received as a gift was pretty funny.

But Indianapolis police apparently didn't agree. Pamela Konchinsky, 56, was pulled over and claims police demanded she remove the sticker, reports The Indianapolis Star.

Konchinsky is now suing the police officers, alleging they violated her constitutional rights. What's the basis of her lawsuit?

One police department in Maryland is planning to live-tweet a prostitution sting sometime this week. What could possibly go wrong?

The Prince George's County Police Department (PGPD) announced that they will blast the details of an undercover prostitution bust live on Twitter, but the department has been secretive about the details.

Why live-tweet a prostitution sting? And why not?

A programmer in San Francisco got some justice after posting a viral video that showed her smartphone and laptop being swiped from a neighborhood cafe.

Police arrested Paul Raynal, 32, on Monday, after a tweeting tipster who'd seen the viral video spotted the alleged perpetrator at a nearby Starbucks -- wearing the same outfit seen in the video from three days earlier.

Can social media and stupidity combine to fight crime?

World Trade Center BASE Jumpers Face Burglary Charges

A World Trade Center BASE jump has landed four men in legal trouble. Three skydiving enthusiasts and their alleged accomplice have been arrested on burglary and reckless endangerment charges for a daring parachute jump in September.

Marko Markovich, 27; Andrew Rossig, 33; and James Brady, 32, are professional BASE jumpers -- standing for "building, antenna, span, earth" -- who set their sights on the rebuilt World Trade Center, the tallest building in the United States, The Associated Press reports. Alleged accomplice Kyle Hartwell, 29, stood watch from the ground.

But how is BASE jumping from atop 1 World Trade Center -- informally known as the Freedom Tower -- considered burglary?

Lawmakers in Hawaii are debating an exemption that currently allows undercover cops to have sex with prostitutes... during their official, professional investigations, of course.

The law has received criticism from human trafficking experts, worried that it can unnecessarily "victimize sex workers," reports The Associated Press. Many in law enforcement, however, argue that they need the legal protection to literally catch prostitutes in the act.

So is it time to say "aloha" (as in "goodbye," not hello) to sex with prostitutes?

Bear-Feeding Woman, 81, Arrested for Feeding Birds

An elderly Florida woman has moved on from feeding bears to feeding birds, in violation of probation.

81-year-old Mary Musselman was on probation for feeding bears. Now she's being held without bail for violating her probation by feeding crows, Tampa's WTVT-TV reports.

If you're an animal lover, you might think this is mean. But when you learn why she was arrested, you might feel otherwise.