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Facebook launched 'Marketplace' last week, and it didn't take long before the social media giant's answer to Craigslist devolved into an anarchic online bazaar hawking the very items banned by the company's commerce policy. Guns, drugs ... Harambe? Marketplace had it all, and Facebook has spent the last few days trying to convince everyone that it was all due to a "technical issue."

So what illegal items turned up in Marketplace before Facebook fixed the glitch? And what things should you avoid buying? Here's a quick look:

This may come as a shock to many, but if you are under federal jurisdiction in the ocean, you can go fishing with your favorite Glock. The video posted to YouTube last month by Courtland Hunt, a Floridian, shows off his prowess at shooting Lionfish with his modified Glock 9mm pistol while underwater.

Lionfish are an invasive species that Florida wildlife officials are asking fisherman to actively seek as the species is destroying reefs at an alarming rate. The video shows the extreme sports enthusiast shooting and killing a handful of the lionfish. While the lionfish feed on the reefs, the shooter makes every effort to draw the fish away from the reef before firing so as to avoid damaging the reef.

In a handful of cities across the nation, The Satanic Temple, a religious political activist organization that does not actually advocate the worship of the devil, has set up afterschool programs for young children that attend schools where evangelical Christian groups also have afterschool programs. The program, called After School Satan Club (ASSC), is a direct response to the Good News Clubs, an afterschool program designed by the Child Evangelism Fellowship.

While the name may sound ominous, foreboding, or perhaps downright silly, the program has clear, secular, and realistic goals. ASSC programs teach a scientific, rationalist, non-superstitious worldview, and allegedly make no effort to educate children about or convert children into members of The Satanic Temple.

The urban legend has people waking up in bathtubs full of ice and discovering that their kidney has been removed, all because of a lucrative black market for internal organs. And that black market exists because most state and federal laws prohibit people from selling their organs, citing public policy concerns and the negative incentives that a body part market would create.

But it's your body -- surely you can lop a little of it off if you choose to, right? It turns out there are a few pieces of you that you can sell, so here's a quick legal guide to selling your body parts for fun and profit:

Did 'Antiques Roadshow' Bros, Keno Twins, Commit Auction Fraud?

If you watch Antiques Roadshow on public television, then you know its charming hosts, twin brothers Leslie and Leigh Keno. They are sophisticated and handsome fellows, 59, with fancy credentials and a passion for Americana. They love old items and they know better than most what is and is not junk, what things are worth. That is why their actions have been raising eyebrows lately.

The brothers have, until recently, enjoyed great reputations in the fine collectibles community. But the Kenos drew suspicion when they bid against each other at auctions, driving prices absurdly high, and fell behind on their bills. The New York Times reports that the twins are accused of auction fraud. The brothers say it's all a misunderstanding.

Fugitive Sect Leader Lyle Jeffs Demands Feds Drop Welfare Fraud Charges

Some people answer to the law of the land and some answer only to their religion. This is essentially the legal argument of Lyle Jeffs, the interim leader of a polygamous sect, the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ Latter Day Saints (FLDS Church). He is charged with welfare fraud and is a wanted fugitive. Despite this, his lawyers are demanding that charges against him be dropped after Jeffs recently slipped out of his GPS monitor while on supervised release.

Lyle Jeffs, brother of Warren Jeffs who is in prison for his relations with underage girls, is arguing that members of his sect endanger their chances of salvation when they do not pool their welfare benefits. As such, he argues, he should not be charged with a $12 million food stamps benefit fraud scheme.

Flag burning is legal. The Supreme Court said so. Our right to burn the American flag, the Stars and Stripes, the Red, White and Blue, the very Star-Spangled Banner, is protected by the First Amendment. But some states still have anti-flag burning statutes on the books, and, regardless of what the High Court says on the matter, many, many people don't like it when you burn the flag.

Which leads us to the curious case of Bryton Mellott of Urbana, Illinois, who decided to torch Old Glory on Independence Day, take photos, and post those photos to Facebook. What happened next may not surprise you: people got angry and Mellott was arrested. But then he was released and all charges were dropped.

In Missouri, if you're interested in supporting Eric Greitens's gubernatorial campaign. The Republican candidate and former Navy SEAL officer is selling "ISIS hunting permits" to raise money for his campaign.

So how many ISIS can you bag under this (fake) permit? And will the scolds down at the fish and game office really be out tracking this season?

Old Man Writes to Federal Court to Complain About Deflategate Decision

They say that with age comes patience and wisdom, but one World War II veteran, 93, is short on the former. He wrote a letter to federal judges on the Second Circuit Court of Appeals to let them know that their recent intervention in a sports scandal is, well, scandalous.

Calling a decision to overturn a ruling for quarterback Tom Brady and reinstate his four-game suspension for Deflategate "asinine," Warren B. Lessing chided the judges for wasting time. "Don't you have anything more important to do," he asked in his letter, reports the New York Daily News. Let's see why he's angry.

Poultry Workers Need Longer Bathroom Breaks, Report Claims

You care if your chickens roam free and get healthy feed, whether the meat is organic or not. So probably you also care about poultry workers and the conditions in which they work, which are reportedly not great. According to Oxfam America, poultry workers routinely complain of insufficient bathroom breaks and some say that they wear diapers on the job to deal with the problem.

Having adequate bathroom breaks is written into the law, and it's not optional for employers to allow them. So what's going on in the poultry industry?