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Two cases closely watched by the tech industry are making progress through the Second Circuit. In the first case, Apple's e-book litigation may be coming to an end with a proposed settlement awaiting court approval, while the criminal case against Ross William Ulbricht, the alleged founder of Silk Road, is moving forward.

And if that's not enough and you want to try your hand at the judiciary -- well there's a job opening for that. Read on for details.

The United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit has made several announcements in the past month, so we thought we'd give you an update on new job openings at 40 Centre Street.

Pro Bono Panel

The Criminal Justice Act/Pro Bono Committee is seeking new members for the Second Circuit Pro Bono Panel. The purpose of the panel is to provide representation to litigants that are ineligible to have counsel appointed under the Criminal Justice Act, and who are unable to pay for legal representation.

As always, there's lots to catch up on in the Second Circuit. So, let's cut the small talk and get to it.

Ecuadorian Judgment Against Chevron Fraudulent

Earlier this month, a district judge for the Southern District of New York penned a 497-page ruling finding that Steven Donziger violated a laundry list of laws to obtain an Ecuadorian court's judgment against Chevron, said the company in a press release. Donziger has voiced his intentions to appeal, and called the district court's ruling "an appalling decision resulting from a deeply flawed proceeding that overturns a unanimous ruling by Ecuador's Supreme Court," reports The Wall Street Journal.

Pro bono work is an important part of every attorney's practice, and if you want a chance to argue cases before the Second Circuit, pro bono work is a great vehicle for helping people, and gaining valuable trial experience.

Last week, the Second Circuit announced that it is accepting applications for service on the court's Criminal Justice Act Panel, whose members represent habeas corpus petitioners, as well as indigent criminal defendants. If accepted, the term of membership on the CJA Panel is from one to three years. If an attorney is currently a member and is seeking reappointment, she must first wait for her current term to expire.

Just when you thought it was over. Last week we posted that new New York City Mayor de Blasio dropped the stop and frisk appeal, as he had promised in his mayoral campaign. If you thought that would be the end of the saga surrounding the former New York City Mayor Bloomberg's administration's stop and frisk policy, then you thought wrong.

Last Friday, five police association's filed two memoranda of law in opposition to the City's motion for remand with the Second Circuit Court of Appeals, reports The Associated Press. So what does it all mean for stop and frisk?

It looks like the A's have it. Last Friday, the Supreme Court released its order list and two cases originating in the Second Circuit were granted certiorari, and big players in each case start with -- you guessed it, the letter A.

American Broadcasting Companies, Inc. v. Aereo, Inc.

Aereo is in the business of transmitting broadcast television programming to mobile devices, without a license -- sometimes while the program is airing on television. Understandably, broadcasters disagreed with Aereo's practice, and sued Aereo for copyright infringement in district court in New York, seeking a preliminary injunction, which the court denied.

Litigation surrounding credit card swipe fees has been in and out of court for nearly a decade, beginning in 2005, when according to Bloomberg, merchants filed a class action against credit card companies and their banks alleging price fixing.

On December 13, Judge Gleeson, District Judge for the Eastern District of New York, approved a class action settlement, dubbed by Bloomberg as the "largest-ever U.S. antitrust accord."

That may all change, however, as the National Retail Federation recently filed a notice of appeal to the Second Circuit.

We know it's not OK to play favorites, but we're not going to lie: the Second Circuit is one of our (or specifically, my) favorite circuits to cover. And how could it not be? With New York City in its jurisdiction, it would be hard not to have interesting cases coming out of the Second Circuit.

So, as we leap into the new year, let's take a moment to look back on the legal highlights of the Second Circuit in 2013:

More than a dozen years after the 9/11 terror attacks, memories are stirred almost monthly as 9/11-related litigation continues to make its way through the courts. In the latest development, the Second Circuit reversed the district court, essentially bringing Saudi Arabia back into the mix.

Factual and Procedural Background

There are many 9/11 cases in the judicial system. This particular case involves two: In re: Terrorist Attacks on September 11, 2001 (Kingdom of Saudi Arabia et al.) ("Terrorist Attacks") and Doe v. Bin Laden. Both cases are brought by plaintiffs seeking damages from Saudi Arabia, and Afghanistan, respectively for injuries and death resulting from the 9/11 attacks.

Oh, why can't all the circuits be like the Second Circuit? We're never at a loss for interesting cases coming out of the Second (yeah, we're looking at you Tenth Circuit).

There were just too many interesting things happening in the Second Circuit last week so here's a roundup of some of our favorites.