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Michael Lewis' nonfiction book The Big Short, published in 2011, chronicled the 2008 financial crisis as seen through the eyes of some of the people involved in it, including the hedge fund managers who "shorted" (bet against) the market.

In one chapter of the book, Steven Eisman, one of Lewis' sources, meets Wing Chau, the owner of an investment firm that managed collateralized debt obligations (CDOs). CDOs were investments comprised of portions of thousands of subprime mortgages; they were a key vector for the financial collapse.

Casualties, tragically, are a part of war. Soldiers, and their countries, enter into battle knowing that they may pay the ultimate price. And legally, soldiers' families can't sue over their lost lives.

But what happens when those sacrificed lives are taken by those outside of the war?

As Alison Frankel explains for Reuters, the Anti-Terrorism Act of 1992 (ATA) gives these causalities a right of action against certain parties. And the families of a few fallen soldiers are now invoking that law against some of the largest banks in Europe, claiming that they conspired to evade sanctions on Iran, and that the funding passed through was used to sponsor Iranian-trained groups that attacked U.S. soldiers in Iraq.

The police got a tip: There are guns stashed in an abandoned Nissan Maxima in the yard behind a certain house on Enfield Street.

Fair enough. Hartford cops JohnMichael O'Hare and Anthony Pia went to the address to look for the guns, but ran head-first into Seven, the family's St. Bernard. Long story short, they shot Seven multiple times in front of K.H., a then-12-year-old girl, leading to the dog's death.

The district court allowed an exigent circumstances defense, and the jury sided with the defendants. But the Second Circuit overturned that verdict Thursday, holding that there was not sufficient evidence of exigent circumstances and that qualified immunity doesn't apply.

In 2008, before the Great Recession was in full swing, Bank of America bought Countrywide Financial, in efforts to solidify its position in commercial banking, according to NPR. Thinking it got a great deal, instead what Bank of America bought was lots of liability.

As we continue to witness the fallout of the Great Recession, and bailout of banks deemed "too big to fail," Bank of America is dealing with punches from all sides, when not coincidentally, in the space of a week it's nearing settlement terms with the Department of Justice, and was ordered by a federal judge to pay $1.27 billion in damages.

Just call it the case that keeps going, and going. And going. Over two decades strong, what started out as a case to protect the indigenous people of the Amazon basin in Ecuador from the destruction resulting from oil exploration, has devolved into a RICO battle that will test the limits and applicability of the civil provisions of the statute.

Steven Donziger, now in the battle for his reputation, is appealing a district court's ruling against him.

In just the past year, the Second Circuit has decided at least four 9/11 related cases. It reversed a district court decision, resulting in bringing Saudi Arabia back into litigation, and it affirmed (on other grounds) a district court's dismissal of Con Edison's negligence claims against the World Trade Center building developers.

More recently, the Second Circuit heard oral arguments in a case where atheists are challenging the inclusion of a steel cross, created by debris in the wreckage of the World Trade Center collapse, in a 9/11 museum, and just last week heard arguments in a case that will likely drag former Attorney General John Ashcroft back into court regarding the treatment of 9/11 detainees.

The latest decision stemming from the 9/11 tragedy was handed down earlier this month by the Second Circuit.

More than a dozen years after the 9/11 terror attacks, memories are stirred almost monthly as 9/11-related litigation continues to make its way through the courts. In the latest development, the Second Circuit reversed the district court, essentially bringing Saudi Arabia back into the mix.

Factual and Procedural Background

There are many 9/11 cases in the judicial system. This particular case involves two: In re: Terrorist Attacks on September 11, 2001 (Kingdom of Saudi Arabia et al.) ("Terrorist Attacks") and Doe v. Bin Laden. Both cases are brought by plaintiffs seeking damages from Saudi Arabia, and Afghanistan, respectively for injuries and death resulting from the 9/11 attacks.

Though twelve years have passed from that fateful day on September 11, 2001, for any New Yorker present that day, the heartbreaking sight of the World Trade Center towers collapsing, the stench of death and destruction, and the eerie silence looming over New York City, can be recalled in an instant.

Last week, memories of 9/11 came to the forefront as the Second Circuit affirmed a district court's decision dismissing Con Edison's negligence claims against the owners, and contractors, of 7WTC, stemming from the tragic events of that day.

Back in July, SAC Capital was indicted on five counts of insider trading, just two weeks after the S.E.C. filed a civil case against SAC Capital billionaire hedge fund manager Steven Cohen. Today, the United States Attorney's Office for the Southern District of New York announced a plea agreement between the DOJ and SAC Capital, reports Reuters.

J.P. Morgan the longtime teacher's pet, usually found sitting across from the President at meetings, has in a symbolic shift, been relegated to the corner, reports The Wall Street Journal (subscription only). This figurative demotion comes presumably as a result of civil investigations into the mortgage-backed securities that caused, in large part, the financial crisis of 2008.

That hasn't tarnished J.P. Morgan's reputation among investors and analysts however, as two-thirds of the mortgage-bond liability arise from Bear Stearns and Washington Mutual, which J.P. Morgan acquired in 2008 after strong encouragement by U.S. regulators, according the Journal. But one analyst stated: "JPMorgan took it on the chin," reports Bloomberg.