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2nd Cir. Decides Sailing Injury Res Ipsa Loquitur

'Anchors aweigh!'

It's the march song of the United States Navy and also a call to sailors that a ship is underway. But even as anchors clear the sea bottom, maneuvers begin above like a ballet in a foreign language.

On a classic sailboat, deck hands make halyards whir, winches whine and blocks groan. The only meaningful word to unschooled passengers is "boom."

In the vernacular, that's what happened to Charis Tagle aboard the schooner Shearwater. She got hit in the head when a halyard swung across the foredeck and struck her with a pelican clip.

'Fake Rape' Suit Revived Against Rolling Stone

After a college party, Jackie went up to her date's bedroom where his Phi Kappa Psi fraternity brothers were waiting in the dark.

Someone grabbed her by the shoulders; another punched her in the face. One said: "Grab its motherf***** leg."

"As soon as they said it, I knew they were going to rape me," she told Rolling Stone, which grabbed 2.7 million views for its online edition.

The problem was, it was fake.

The Second Circuit Court of Appeals has reversed and remanded the lower court's decision denying Uber's motion to compel arbitration in the Meyer v. Uber price fixing case.

Fortunately for Spencer Meyer, the appellate court's decision does not close the door on his case and send him packing to arbitration. Rather, Meyer and Uber will be going back before the district court to argue over whether the case should be forced into arbitration, at least one more time.

Chevron Escapes $9.5 Billion 'Amazon Chernobyl' Judgment

Energy giant Chevron can breathe a little easier after the Second Circuit overruled a lower court award of $9.5 billion, finding that the judgment was "procured by corrupt means" and attorney fraud. It's a gigantic win for a gigantic company that has the potential to set the tone for international business litigation strategies.

The attorney who is at the center of this reversal-slash-scandal is Steven Donzinger whom Chevron accused of conducting a "shake-down" of the company. Donzinger's lawyer called the circuit's decision "unprecedented."

2nd Cir. Refuses to Re-Open Arab Bank Terrorism Suit

Controversy aside, jurists will have to live with the fact that precedent does not allow a re-hearing of the Arab Bank suit which ruled against victims of suicide bombers late last year.

This was the final say of the Second Circuit, which finally put to rest the suits brought by families of Israeli victims killed by Palestinian suicide bombers during the Second Intifada.

The Second Circuit reluctantly dismissed five lawsuits against Jordan's Arab Bank on Tuesday, ruling that the bank was immune from suit under the Alien Tort Statute. Plaintiffs sought to hold the bank accountable for financing and facilitating terrorist attacks in the West Bank.

Those suits were barred by Second Circuit and Supreme Court precedent, the court explained, while inviting an en banc sitting or the High Court to overrule earlier decisions that have kept terror victims from recovering in court.

In Skiing Hit-and-Run, Resort Off the Hook: 2nd Cir

Yes, you can get in a hit-and-run on the ski slopes, but if you do, don't assume that the resort will be liable. The Second Circuit recently affirmed a district court's grant of summary judgment in favor of a ski resort whose negligence, plaintiff claimed, caused his injury.

The facts are interesting in this case, because it appears that plaintiff was blindsided and did not see the thing or person who collided with him, even for a moment.

If you came down with bronchitis a few years ago, there was a fair chance that your doctor would prescribe Ketek, an antibiotic produced by the French pharmaceutical giant Sanofi-Aventis. That was, until 2007, when the FDA banned the use of Ketek for sinusitis and bronchitis, finding that it was too risky for those diseases and giving it the strongest warning possible -- a so-called "black box" warning -- for certain permitted uses.

The changes came after a year-long FDA investigation which found that the drug could result in severe liver damage. Following the FDA's action, a consortium of health plans sued Sanofi-Aventis for racketeering, arguing that the company fraudulently failed to disclose risks. Their case didn't make it far, however, having been tossed out by the Second Circuit last Friday for failure to establish causation.

Andrew Hall was born in a coal cellar during the Warsaw Uprising against Nazi Germany. It was, perhaps, a foretelling birth: Hall has gone on to make his name as an attorney by fighting against terrorists and corrupt regimes. The goal? Make them pay for their crimes -- in cash.

So far, he's had incredible success, winning cases against state sponsors of terror such as Iraq and Libya. In 2012, he won a $315 million award against Sudan for its involvement in the bombing of the USS Cole. Hall's winning record held up again this Wednesday, as the Second Circuit affirmed the ruling against the Republic of Sudan.

Figure Skater Oksana Baiul Loses Defamation Suit (Again)

Okasana Baiul became famous after she beat both Nancy Kerrigan and Tonya Harding to win the gold medal in figure skating at the infamous 1994 winter Olympic games. Then she fell into alcoholism, resulting in a 1997 car accident.

She revitalized herself, however, and joined season 13 of "The Apprentice." She's also the plaintiff in a defamation suit filed against Disson Skating and NBC, where she claimed Disson and NBC promoted her appearance at a skating event she was actually never supposed to appear at, then made statements creating the impression (she says) that she failed to show up for that appearance. The Second Circuit last week upheld a district court's dismissal of her claim, in which Brian Boitano makes a special guest appearance.