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If you came down with bronchitis a few years ago, there was a fair chance that your doctor would prescribe Ketek, an antibiotic produced by the French pharmaceutical giant Sanofi-Aventis. That was, until 2007, when the FDA banned the use of Ketek for sinusitis and bronchitis, finding that it was too risky for those diseases and giving it the strongest warning possible -- a so-called "black box" warning -- for certain permitted uses.

The changes came after a year-long FDA investigation which found that the drug could result in severe liver damage. Following the FDA's action, a consortium of health plans sued Sanofi-Aventis for racketeering, arguing that the company fraudulently failed to disclose risks. Their case didn't make it far, however, having been tossed out by the Second Circuit last Friday for failure to establish causation.

Andrew Hall was born in a coal cellar during the Warsaw Uprising against Nazi Germany. It was, perhaps, a foretelling birth: Hall has gone on to make his name as an attorney by fighting against terrorists and corrupt regimes. The goal? Make them pay for their crimes -- in cash.

So far, he's had incredible success, winning cases against state sponsors of terror such as Iraq and Libya. In 2012, he won a $315 million award against Sudan for its involvement in the bombing of the USS Cole. Hall's winning record held up again this Wednesday, as the Second Circuit affirmed the ruling against the Republic of Sudan.

Figure Skater Oksana Baiul Loses Defamation Suit (Again)

Okasana Baiul became famous after she beat both Nancy Kerrigan and Tonya Harding to win the gold medal in figure skating at the infamous 1994 winter Olympic games. Then she fell into alcoholism, resulting in a 1997 car accident.

She revitalized herself, however, and joined season 13 of "The Apprentice." She's also the plaintiff in a defamation suit filed against Disson Skating and NBC, where she claimed Disson and NBC promoted her appearance at a skating event she was actually never supposed to appear at, then made statements creating the impression (she says) that she failed to show up for that appearance. The Second Circuit last week upheld a district court's dismissal of her claim, in which Brian Boitano makes a special guest appearance.

Arne Svenson, a visual artist, created a series of photographs, entitled "The Neighbors," by using a telephoto lens to photograph the residents of the building across the street from him. His photos capture people at mundane and intimate moments like napping on a couch or scrubbing a floor. The neighbors, who did not know they were being photographed in their homes and did not consent to having their images displayed, sued, alleging the works violated their privacy rights.

A New York appellate court sided with the artist last Friday, finding that the artistic expression is constitutionally protected and exempt from the state's privacy law.

GoDaddy, the domain registrar and web hosting company, is immune from defamation claims based on the websites it hosts, the Second Circuit ruled last week. The inexplicably named company had been sued by two pro se litigants over allegedly false statements made against them on a Teamsters website.

Under the Communications Decency Act, web sites, apps, hosting companies and other "interactive computer services" are protected from claims of defamation, negligence, invasion of privacy and other torts based on the publication of information by their users.

SCOTUS Denies Cert. in Ground Zero Environmental Cleanup Case

The Supreme Court yesterday denied a petition for a writ of certiorari in a case that's been going on since 2008, pitting a real estate developer against the owner of the World Trade Center site to figure out who was going to pay for cleanup costs related to the September 11 attacks.

When the real estate developer, Cedar & Washington, wanted to renovate an office building in downtown New York, the state Department of Environmental Conservation and the EPA told the developer the building might contain "WTC dust," consisting of fine particles of concrete along with hazardous substances like lead, mercury, and asbestos that settled in and on the building following the destruction of the World Trade Center towers in 2001.

Michael Lewis Didn't Defame Wing Chau in 'The Big Short': 2nd Cir.

Michael Lewis' nonfiction book The Big Short, published in 2011, chronicled the 2008 financial crisis as seen through the eyes of some of the people involved in it, including the hedge fund managers who "shorted" (bet against) the market.

In one chapter of the book, Steven Eisman, one of Lewis' sources, meets Wing Chau, the owner of an investment firm that managed collateralized debt obligations (CDOs). CDOs were investments comprised of portions of thousands of subprime mortgages; they were a key vector for the financial collapse.

Soldiers' Families Seek to Hold Banks Liable For Terrorism in Iraq

Casualties, tragically, are a part of war. Soldiers, and their countries, enter into battle knowing that they may pay the ultimate price. And legally, soldiers' families can't sue over their lost lives.

But what happens when those sacrificed lives are taken by those outside of the war?

As Alison Frankel explains for Reuters, the Anti-Terrorism Act of 1992 (ATA) gives these causalities a right of action against certain parties. And the families of a few fallen soldiers are now invoking that law against some of the largest banks in Europe, claiming that they conspired to evade sanctions on Iran, and that the funding passed through was used to sponsor Iranian-trained groups that attacked U.S. soldiers in Iraq.

2nd Circuit Revives Fatal Dog Shooting Lawsuit From Conn.

The police got a tip: There are guns stashed in an abandoned Nissan Maxima in the yard behind a certain house on Enfield Street.

Fair enough. Hartford cops JohnMichael O'Hare and Anthony Pia went to the address to look for the guns, but ran head-first into Seven, the family's St. Bernard. Long story short, they shot Seven multiple times in front of K.H., a then-12-year-old girl, leading to the dog's death.

The district court allowed an exigent circumstances defense, and the jury sided with the defendants. But the Second Circuit overturned that verdict Thursday, holding that there was not sufficient evidence of exigent circumstances and that qualified immunity doesn't apply.

In 2008, before the Great Recession was in full swing, Bank of America bought Countrywide Financial, in efforts to solidify its position in commercial banking, according to NPR. Thinking it got a great deal, instead what Bank of America bought was lots of liability.

As we continue to witness the fallout of the Great Recession, and bailout of banks deemed "too big to fail," Bank of America is dealing with punches from all sides, when not coincidentally, in the space of a week it's nearing settlement terms with the Department of Justice, and was ordered by a federal judge to pay $1.27 billion in damages.