Will 'Fantastical' 9/11 Lawsuit Get Lawyer Sanctioned? - Strategist
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Will 'Fantastical' 9/11 Lawsuit Get Lawyer Sanctioned?

Would you ever file a lawsuit based on allegations that are generally recognized as "fantastical" and part of a conspiracy theory?

While you mull that over, consider the case of Attorney William Veale.

He's been instructed by the 2nd Circuit to show cause for why he should not be sanctioned after filing a lawsuit on behalf of a client claiming that the 9/11 attacks were part of a larger Bush Administration conspiracy.

Veale's client, April Gallop, was working at the Pentagon when it was attacked, suffering head and brain injuries.

She believes that Dick Cheney, Donald Rumsfeld and Richard Myers ordered the attacks so that they could advance their international political agenda and conceal $2.3 trillion in misallocated funds to the Department of Defense.

The complaint alleges that the Pentagon was destroyed by either a missile, explosives, or by hired Muslim extremists.

The lower court didn't buy it, and neither did the 2nd Circuit.

In some of their more choice phrases, the Judges called the plaintiff's inconsistent allegations a "fantastical alternative history" and "pure speculation and conjecture."

They also wrote that the complaint "was brought without the slightest chance of success."

It's pretty obvious that Veale and his client will be subject to sanctions, but in an odd twist, he may actually have a very good response.

One of the presiding judges is none other than John Walker, first cousin of former Presidents Bush. Veale had requested that he recuse himself, but was denied both his request and its appeal.

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