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Is Your Personality to Blame for Lost Business?

What do you get when you cross a lawyer and a pig? Nothing, because there are some things a pig won't do.

If you didn't laugh at that one, maybe it's because you heard it before. But maybe it's because you can't take a joke. Seriously, one of the keys to being likeable is not to take yourself too seriously.

Whether you like it or not, your personality has a lot to do with business success. Here are some ways your lawyer personality may be to blame for lost business.

You're So Vain

You probably think this blog is about you, don't you? Chillax, Carly Simon, we're talking about your ego, not you.

Being self-centered is the opposite of being service-oriented. Focus on your clients' needs -- not your own -- and they will come and they will stay.

You're So Busy

It is hard to focus on clients when your phone is constantly interrupting, or you spend more time texting than talking to them during an interview. Put the phone down. Turn off the ringer.

Being super busy is not the same as being super efficient. Clients expect you to be busy, but not rude. If you forget they are paying you for your attention, they will pay someone else.

You're Not Funny

Why do so many people stay up late to listen to Jimmy Kimmel, Stephen Colbert, or Jimmy Fallon? Because they want to hear what Kimmel, Colbert, or Fallon will have to say about Trump's latest "covfefe" tweet. People need somebody to put a funny spin on life's twists and turns.

And so it is with lawyers. We are not comedians, but we have to help clients make some sense -- in a relatable way -- out of the mess that often comes with their legal problems.

So if you are losing business, maybe it's time to lighten up and learn how to take a joke. Ten million viewers can't be wrong.

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