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You may make a great first impression on your potential clients, what kind of impression does your law office make?

If your office looks like every other lawyer's office, your potential clients could be underwhelmed. Everybody has seen the diplomas on the wall, the fake potted plants, and the bookcases filled with law books that nobody ever touches.

Instead, dress your law office for success and make a great first impression with these five tips:

Courts move slowly, as Chief Justice Roberts noted in his State of the Federal Judiciary Report earlier this year. Yes, he knows that the Court needs electronic filing and video recording, but for vague or unspecified reasons, they're just not ready for that yet.

Now that we think about it, all courts at every level have weird anachronisms that shouldn't exist anymore, or practices that just plain don't make sense. We've assembled a list of five things courts need to stop doing in the year 2015. This is the year of the Hoverboard, after all!

When someone is "livid," has he turned red with anger, white with anger, or purple with anger? As lawyers, words are our currency, and there are many other lawyers and judges out there who will know if you use a word to mean something that it doesn't mean.

The 10 words we've listed below aren't being used in a new, accepted way (like "decimate" being used to mean "decrease" instead of "decrease by 10 percent"); rather, they're words that are routinely used contrary to their definitions. Instead of a usage change, many of these words are what Henry Fowler would call a "slipshod extension" -- an expression of degree that's been taken beyond its original limit.

Check out this list of commonly misused words:

Lawyer's 'Admit to a DUI' Scholarship: Deterrent or Marketing Ploy?

Is this a noble attempt at deterring teens from driving drunk or a marketing ploy? We'll let you decide.

Christian Schwaner, a DUI defense attorney in Colorado Springs, Colorado, is offering a $1,000 scholarship to the winner of a contest for teens who admit to driving drunk. Applicants must also research the dangers of doing so and come up with a plan for avoiding such missteps in the future, reports The Denver Post.

Critics, however, are already lining up, with some saying that it might implicitly encourage drunk driving and others worrying about the ethics implications of the contest.

Being a lawyer really isn't a job for an introvert, but we find our niches. We don't like getting up and talking in front of an audience, but we like writing in quiet cubby-holes, doing our jobs without anyone around.

Yeah, that's not going to cut it for long. Lawyers are stereotypically loud, and brash, and they like to talk (except maybe most of them are introverts?). One of these days, you're going to need to hang out with (gasp) other people. Just like Dr. Leo Marvin counseled (before he went crazy), it's baby steps. So here are some New Year's resolutions for the lawyer introverts out there:

E-Readers, Tablets, Smartphones Are Ruining Your Sleep: Study

Having trouble sleeping at night? Here's the latest culprit: backlit digital screens.

According to a recent study conducted by researchers at Harvard Medical School, the blue light from backlit devices (that would be pretty much everything: smartphones, tablets, and most e-readers) can lead to reduced melatonin, which leads to less sleep, less quality sleep, and increased grogginess the following morning. Long-term reduced melatonin levels can be even more serious, as other studies have linked it to an increase in one's risk for certain types of cancer.

But, but, a cute girl is texting me! And a client is freaking out over email!

Americans don't really negotiate over things as much as people do in other countries. We're accustomed to just paying the sticker price and moving on with our lives. But there are a plethora of things you can acquire for a cheaper price by putting your fancy lawyerly negotiatin' skills to work.

Here are five examples:

I hope you've purchased your Costco-sized bottle of antacids: The holiday season means travel, and travel means stress via missed flights, delayed flights, poor weather, nasty people, and luggage that's in Boston instead of Albuquerque (but don't worry; you'll get a $25 voucher for your troubles).

So how can you get work done on the go? Thankfully, airports, airplanes, trains, and even buses are much friendlier to getting work done than they ever have been. (Downside: You're expected to be working all the time.) Here are a few tips that can help:

Black Friday will soon be upon us; or, more properly, the month-long holiday binge once called "Black Friday" is already here. That means you can get discounts on lawyer gifts for your lawyer friends as early as today.

But what do lawyers want for Christmas? Law-related stuff, of course, which includes gifts that make them seem more important than they really are. Here are some gift ideas that should please any lawyer.

In Focus: How Lawyers Can Reduce Eye Strain

You know what was vastly underrated? The Smith-Corona typewriter. Typewriters didn't distract you with celebrity gossip. They didn't have email alerts popping up in the corner of your screen, ready to interrupt your work every few minutes. And eye fatigue? Not so much, not when you're not staring at an artificially lit computer screen for 8 to 10 hours straight.

Sadly, the typewriter is no more. Research, brief writing, and even filing is done using these damned computers and the "information superhighway." According to the 2014 Digital Eye Strain Report, Americans on average are now spending nine hours per day in front of a digital screen. Nearly 70 percent of adults report eye strain, more so among younger adults (18 to 34) than older adults with presumably higher rates of actual eye issues.

What can you do to relieve the pain? Here are a few tips: