Legal Lifestyle for Small Law Firms - Strategist
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We've written before about how lawyers do (or at least, should) extend each other professional courtesies. These small actions, like not objecting to reasonable discovery requests or scheduling depositions at convenient times and places, amount to treating opposing counsel with respect.

Some lawyers, though, think that any amount of cordiality amounts to surrender. They've got to the establish themselves as the Alpha Dog, or whatever metaphor their self-help books use. How do you deal with these crazy people?

There's a reason LinkedIn urges you to upload a photo. For better or worse, how we look deeply affects others' perceptions of our strength, intelligence and trustworthiness, according to a round up of the relevant neuroscience done by Entrepreneur Magazine.

Happy faces -- think smiling, bright eyes -- make you seem more trustworthy. People respond better to faces they perceive as healthy over ones they see as smart. Those sort of impressions matter, especially when you're looking for a leg up in a job hunt.

So, are you ready for your close up? Here's five tips to help you repeat the benefits of a well-done LinkedIn photo:

Staying late, working weekends, worrying over your performance -- all of this can quickly lead to burnout. For lawyers, burnout is so common that there are whole industries devoted to helping us quit the profession.

But how can you be sure you're actually burning out like a cheap light bulb and not just going through a bad patch? Here are five signs you may be at the end of your rope:

Gone are the "Mad Men"-esque days where everyone wore suits to the office. While many offices still have "dress down" or "casual" Fridays, reportedly invented by Dockers in 1992 (though possibly going back to Hewlett Packard in the 1950s, claims Business Insider), lots of offices have done away with suits and ties altogether.

The modern office is as casual, or as formal, as it has to be, and what it has to be is determined by its geography, its clientele, and its size. Where does your firm fit in?

In addition to being on TV for most of the 1990s, and providing a platform for a post-"Bill and Ted" but pre-"Matrix" Keanu Reeves, "The Devil's Advocate" confirmed for the world that lawyers are evil. Al Pacino's character was literally the devil. How else could he be a defense attorney?

In practice, we do sometimes joke about "selling our souls" to BigLaw, but can you practice law and still have a soul?

Ah, the professional convention. To some lawyers, they're a great way to network while catching up on the latest professional developments. To others, they're a short purgatory of endless meetings, roundtables and presentations.

Even if you're a conference-hater, these gatherings shouldn't be ignored. Conferences, conventions and other convocations of skilled professionals can be important sources of new information, new strategies, and even new clients.

As more and more Baby Boomers head toward retirement, the workforce is growing ever younger. For some, that means the twilight of their careers could be spent working under a much younger boss. Even mid-career professionals can find themselves reporting to a fresh-faced wunderkind.

Already, Generation X and Millennials make up two-thirds of the workforce, and their numbers are growing. As younger workers begin to take on more prominent roles, some simple tips can help more experienced workers adjust to careers underneath a younger boss. Here are five you may want to consider:

You may make a great first impression on your potential clients, what kind of impression does your law office make?

If your office looks like every other lawyer's office, your potential clients could be underwhelmed. Everybody has seen the diplomas on the wall, the fake potted plants, and the bookcases filled with law books that nobody ever touches.

Instead, dress your law office for success and make a great first impression with these five tips:

Courts move slowly, as Chief Justice Roberts noted in his State of the Federal Judiciary Report earlier this year. Yes, he knows that the Court needs electronic filing and video recording, but for vague or unspecified reasons, they're just not ready for that yet.

Now that we think about it, all courts at every level have weird anachronisms that shouldn't exist anymore, or practices that just plain don't make sense. We've assembled a list of five things courts need to stop doing in the year 2015. This is the year of the Hoverboard, after all!

When someone is "livid," has he turned red with anger, white with anger, or purple with anger? As lawyers, words are our currency, and there are many other lawyers and judges out there who will know if you use a word to mean something that it doesn't mean.

The 10 words we've listed below aren't being used in a new, accepted way (like "decimate" being used to mean "decrease" instead of "decrease by 10 percent"); rather, they're words that are routinely used contrary to their definitions. Instead of a usage change, many of these words are what Henry Fowler would call a "slipshod extension" -- an expression of degree that's been taken beyond its original limit.

Check out this list of commonly misused words: