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Now that the grand jury in Ferguson, Missouri has decided not to indict Officer Darren Wilson for the death of Michael Brown, there were protests, and there will be more protests.

As a lawyer, you might be representing one of any number of groups affected by the protests, whether they're business owners in areas where people are gathering; crime victims; or the protestors themselves. Here's some basic and practical advice you can give to each of these clients.

Last Thursday, President Obama outlined his plan for dealing with the problem of undocumented immigrants. It involves selective enforcement of immigration laws, focusing more on criminals and less on families and children.

With the implementation of new immigration regulations come new opportunities, both for undocumented immigrants and for attorneys. Here's what you should know about the immigration order.

What's new and notable in the legal blawgosphere? Lately, it seems many websites are singing the praises of criminal defense lawyers.

Yes, life is tough for the criminal defense attorney. You're constantly asked why you represent guilty people, and if you're a public defender, people don't think you're a real lawyer (as in, "Should I get a public defender or a real lawyer?").

Cheer up, though: You're doing the work the Constitution calls for -- and at least it's not document review. Here are a few blogs and websites you may want to check out:

They say not to look a gift horse in the mouth, and a good mentor, typically, is doing just that: gifting her time and energy towards helping a younger attorney progress in her personal and professional life.

But, like tube socks on Christmas morning, not all mentors are a hit.

For all the lawyer mentors out there (and for those who agreed to be a mentor but kinda forgot about it until just now), here are five signs you should probably step up your game:

As lawyers, we can receive up to 100 emails per day -- and that's on a slow day. Keeping track of so much email, and maintaining a clutter-free inbox can be a big job in itself -- before you actually even get to the content of the email messages.

How many of you have received an email that you weren't quite sure how to interpret? You're not alone. Without the benefit of the messenger's tone of voice, or expression, we end up projecting a tone on to the email message based on what we see on the computer screen.

Ramadan is coming. And for those that fast, this is probably the worst time of year for Ramadan. With daylight hours clocking in at almost 15 hours of the day, Ramadan (always difficult) is especially hard during summer.

So, as an attorney that is working at a fast pace for much of the day, how do you fulfill your religious obligations, while also fulfilling your professional and ethical obligations?

Last week, we read about an article discussing the fine line between having the right amount of stuff on your plate to avoid boredom, and being too busy. That elusive place in the middle was dubbed the "sweet spot" by The Wall Street Journal, and accompanied by a snazzy graphic (see below).

That got us thinking, how can lawyers find that elusive sweet spot? Here are our tips for finding that stress sweet spot and avoiding both boredom and overload.

So much of what we write about at FindLaw has to do with giving advice to attorneys -- but what about your clients?

We recently heard about a judge who lost his cool and yelled at a woman convicted of violently killing her boyfriend and stated "I hope you die in prison!" Apparently, it's not the first time he's said that to someone either, according to The Huffington Post. So what led him to make this outburst? The woman's disrespectful conduct: she interrupted the victim's aunt, snickered and rolled her eyes.

The judge was not amused.

Should Your Client Take Acting Lessons?

Oscar Pistorius, now on trial for murdering his girlfriend, has become famous for his outward signs of grief and anguish, including weeping and throwing up. Are the tears genuine? Is the vomit mere crocodile vomit? Who can tell? But he is putting on such a show that he's just been accused of taking acting lessons.

Huh, Acting Lessons? Good idea?

Should your client take acting lessons? Let's answer that question with a question, a question likely to be asked by opposing counsel. That question is, "Is it true that in preparation for your testimony here today, you took acting lessons?!?!"

Internet Lawyer Marketing? Let's Do It Effectively.

The Internet is now the most popular way for people to find a lawyer.

According to a new survey from FindLaw, this is a big change from just a few years ago. In 2005, only 7% of people would have used the Internet, while 65% would have asked a friend or relative. Nowadays, only 29% would ask a friend or relative, while 38% would use the Internet. Ten percent would consult a local bar association, and just 4% would consult the Yellow Pages. (However, 15% already have a relationship with a lawyer and wouldn't need to research one. The survey has a margin of error of 3%.)

Looking at those numbers, I'm almost starting to think that this new-fangled Internet fad is here to stay. So, if you can't beat 'em, join 'em. Are you using the Internet to market your firm effectively? Here are three ways to create or polish your net presence.