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If you're not meeting your clients in person, then your options are limited: phone or videoconferencing.

The problem with videoconferencing is the competing standards. There's (deep breath): Skype, Facebook, FaceTime, Google Hangouts, WebEx, and more. Some are mobile-friendly, some are not. Some are great for Apple users, some are better for Windows users.

Your best bet is to be familiar with all the standards, just in case your client is a die-hard adherent to single platform. And if not, there is an up-and-coming cross-platform standard that is compatible with nearly everything.

So you've decided to make the leap into a "virtual" or online law practice. You've weighed the pros and cons and think you have a client base that is (a) tech-savvy, (b) in need of counsel, and (c) willing to hire you, rather than some online legal services provider.

Wonderful. Now you need to consider the finer points, beginning with how you'll manage to run conflict checks and handle intake for online-only clients. And with a client base that could stretch as far as the geographic borders of where you are licensed to practice, this is no small concern.

People who watch lawyer shows think that lawyers bluster in a courtroom all day long, but we know what it's really about: Writing. Lots of writing.

Throughout 2014, FindLaw's Strategist and Greedy Associates blogs published many notable pieces about legal writing, and how to do it better. Here are the 10 legal writing posts that you liked the most:

Should Lawyers Take Acting Classes?

Being a trial lawyer is truly a theatrical experience. It involves not only the technical elements of theater, like staging and voice, but also the truly "act-y" parts. What will you say, and when? How will you react to a question you already know the answer to? And most importantly, how do you impress a jury?

Add to that your own witnesses, or even your own client. They may need to step up their acting game as well. Should all of you take acting classes? Here are a few points to consider:

In the wake of the non-indictments in both the Michael Brown and Eric Garner cases, everyone's talking about the possibility of civil suits against the Ferguson, Missouri, and New York City police departments.

Those are by no means certain, though. If you have a client who's thinking about suing a police department, here are some things to keep in mind about police civil suits.

Now that the grand jury in Ferguson, Missouri has decided not to indict Officer Darren Wilson for the death of Michael Brown, there were protests, and there will be more protests.

As a lawyer, you might be representing one of any number of groups affected by the protests, whether they're business owners in areas where people are gathering; crime victims; or the protestors themselves. Here's some basic and practical advice you can give to each of these clients.

Last Thursday, President Obama outlined his plan for dealing with the problem of undocumented immigrants. It involves selective enforcement of immigration laws, focusing more on criminals and less on families and children.

With the implementation of new immigration regulations come new opportunities, both for undocumented immigrants and for attorneys. Here's what you should know about the immigration order.

What's new and notable in the legal blawgosphere? Lately, it seems many websites are singing the praises of criminal defense lawyers.

Yes, life is tough for the criminal defense attorney. You're constantly asked why you represent guilty people, and if you're a public defender, people don't think you're a real lawyer (as in, "Should I get a public defender or a real lawyer?").

Cheer up, though: You're doing the work the Constitution calls for -- and at least it's not document review. Here are a few blogs and websites you may want to check out:

They say not to look a gift horse in the mouth, and a good mentor, typically, is doing just that: gifting her time and energy towards helping a younger attorney progress in her personal and professional life.

But, like tube socks on Christmas morning, not all mentors are a hit.

For all the lawyer mentors out there (and for those who agreed to be a mentor but kinda forgot about it until just now), here are five signs you should probably step up your game:

As lawyers, we can receive up to 100 emails per day -- and that's on a slow day. Keeping track of so much email, and maintaining a clutter-free inbox can be a big job in itself -- before you actually even get to the content of the email messages.

How many of you have received an email that you weren't quite sure how to interpret? You're not alone. Without the benefit of the messenger's tone of voice, or expression, we end up projecting a tone on to the email message based on what we see on the computer screen.