Law Firm Rainmaking for Small Law Firms - Strategist
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Over the past decade, craft brewing has taken off, with hip, local microbreweries popping up everywhere from post-industrial Brooklyn to downtown St. Louis, just a DIPA's throw away from the Anheuser-Busch mega breweries.

But your small batch sours are no longer the hot new thing when it comes to drinking. The cool kids these days (along with plenty of discerning drinkers) are all about craft distilling, seeking out the best microvodkas, the rarest whiskeys, and the most artisanal bitters. And when craft distilling booms, so too does the need for skilled, knowledgeable attorneys to guide small distillers through this highly-regulated industry.

Growth is good. But how do you go about it? You could take in more clients, bring on higher-paying clients, or make more efficient use of the resources you already have.

To help you out, here are our top posts on growing your small or solo firm's profits, from the FindLaw archives.

Succession planning isn't easy. After all, no one likes to think about death, particularly their own.

While many adults can cope with their mortality long enough to put together a will or estate plan, when it comes of business succession planning, one of the biggest obstacles facing lawyers is convincing business owners to just get started. Here's how attorneys can help clients get over their inertia.

If arguments about gender parity, viewpoint diversity, and good old-fashion equality hasn't convinced you of the importance of women in leadership, maybe this will: having women in power is connected to increased profitability.

A study recently released by the Peterson Institute for International Economics and EY (Ernst & Young) shows that having a woman in the highest corporate positions is correlated to better profits. The legal industry, long dominated by men, might want to take note.

The health care industry continues to be reshaped by changes in federal law and technological developments. Health care companies are merging at greater rates and putting more attention towards corporate governance. Patients are starting to receive their first video consultations and turning to health care apps.

Many of these industry developments have legal implications that will directly influence health law practitioners this year. And you don't need a crystal ball to see what those issues will be. Bloomberg BNA's Health Law Reporter's 2016 outlook is good enough, outlining the major issues that will face lawyers and the industry in the year ahead. Here are the highlights.

Hoverboards were 2015's Cabbage Patch Doll or Tickle-Me Elmo -- that is, the gift to get this holiday season. The self-balancing platforms on wheels (think Segway's, but without anything to hold on to) are everyone's favorite new toy. That is, when they're not dropping you on your back or bursting into flames.

And now, lawyers want in on the fun too. Here's why the New Year may be the year of hoverboard liability.

The home health care industry is thriving. Fueled by an aging Boomer population and the desire of many patients to be treated in their own residences, the at-home provisioning of nursing and therapist care has become a $30 billion industry, with 12,000 Medicare-certified agencies.

That industry growth has lead to an increased need for attorneys experienced in Medicare reimbursement, industry regulations, and old-fashioned litigation. As a practice area, expect to see home health care law grow as quickly as the population grays.

Pros and Cons of Taking Small Claims Cases

For most lawyers, the question of whether or not to take >small claims cases will inevitably come up. Many "successful" lawyers will simply dismiss these cases as being a waste of time. By definition, these small-ticket cases simply represent potential opportunity costs of bigger and more monied cases.

But small claims bring value in place of the money they don't. These cases can be a good way for attorneys to build up valuable courtroom experience while providing a service that many clients wouldn't otherwise be able to afford. Mike Vraa from Lawyerist collected a number of points that attorneys should consider when taking on small claims cases.

You just finished a new client's estate plan and were blown away by how much wealth she's amassed from her dog washing on demand app startup -- and she's looking for investors in her next project. Or maybe a prospective client comes to you for help incorporating a new business. He's got a great business plan, a lot of experience, but not enough cash to cover legal fees.

Should you invest in that Uber for pet grooming? Can you help out your incorporation client by exchanging legal services for an ownership stake?

Need some new toys, architectural models, or maybe an undetectable gun? No need to take a trip to the store. For a few hundred dollars, you can pick up a consumer-grade 3-D printer and start printing out everything from Japanese flutes to Adidas sneakers.

For lawyers, 3D printers could also be pumping out new clients and extra billable hours, as consumer 3D printing leads to increased intellectual property disputes.